A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE

Women's Cancers

Women's Cancers
The power of collaboration and a dedication to compassion
 
The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope brings together medical doctors and laboratory researchers from across City of Hope who are committed to increasing our understanding of the risks for developing breast and gynecologic (uterus, ovary, and cervix) cancers, developing novel strategies for treatment and prevention, and improving the lives of patients. These unique collaborations result in the rapid translation of scientific discoveries into more effective treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers.
 
 
Changing our patients' lives today

Our research serves as the foundation for developing new treatments for women diagnosed with cancer. Educating women about risk reduction, disease management, and post-treatment care is a major element of the program. We offer a wide range of clinical services, including screening/imaging/diagnostic approaches; genetic counseling and risk assessment; multidisciplinary therapeutic interventions including surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and reconstructive surgery procedures; rehabilitation and supportive care; long-term follow-up care; and prevention strategies.
 
We are the only women’s cancers program in the country to offer a biopsychosocial approach to care. We focus not just on the disease but on the biological, psychological and social factors that play a significant role in the lives of women battling cancer.
 
The Women's Cancers Program at City of Hope is among only a few in the nation to offer minimally invasive robotic surgery using the da Vinci S HD Surgical System. This robotic surgical approach offers greater accuracy, smaller incisions, less postoperative pain and faster healing.
 
We are among a few women’s cancers programs in the country to routinely use intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy to treat certain types of gynecologic cancer, which can greatly improve the outcomes for women with advanced disease.

Our patients are given the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. We are constantly evaluating new drugs and developing better treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers, designed to improve the likelihood of a cure. Many of these new treatment approaches are available only at City of Hope.

The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope, one of the largest in Southern California, continues to grow to meet the need for highly specialized and leading cancer care. We are at the forefront of breast and gynecologic cancer treatment and research, and we take a comprehensive and aggressive approach to provide the most advanced treatments available.

Care continues after treatment

Our doctors and researchers are working to develop resources to help improve the lives of women after treatment, and all patients are able to participate in ongoing long-term research that focuses on life after cancer.
 

Support This Program

We deliver exquisite care at the leading edge of cancer treatment. It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts - and those of our supporters today -- have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables City of Hope to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies - helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact:

Janet Morgan

Senior Director
Phone: 213-241-7250
Email: jmorgan@coh.org

 
 
City of Hope Locations

The Positive Image Center is where licensed cosmetologists support and assist patients with building and maintaining self-confidence in their appearance. Services are free and provide a forum in which patients can access wig fittings and stylings and discuss cosmetic techniques.
 
Cooper Finkel Women’s Health Center
Many gynecological cancer and breast cancer  services at City of Hope are provided at the Rita Cooper Finkel and J. William Finkel Women's Health Center. Here, women receive the highest quality care, whether seeking prevention and screening services or coping with a cancer diagnosis.
Physicians in the United States and throughout the world are welcome to refer patients to City of Hope.

There are a number of options you can choose from to refer a patient:

  • Call 800-826-HOPE (4673) to speak with a patient referral specialist.
  • Fax the patient face sheet to 626-301-8432
  • Complete an online callback request form
 
Clinical Trials
Our aggressive pursuit to discover better ways to help patients now – not years from now – places us among the leaders worldwide in the administration of clinical trials.
 
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Brain surgery is not for the faint of heart. It takes courage, as well as curiosity and compassion. The truly great surgeons also have a desire to find new, and better ways, of healing the brain. Enter Behnam Badie, M.D., chief of neurosurgery at City of Hope. Now a pioneer in brain tumor treatment, Badie enter...
  • Elizabeth Budde, M.D., Ph.D., wants to encourage infighting. She aims to turn the immune system on itself — to the benefit of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, or AML. AML arises when abnormal white blood cells grow out of control, amassing in the bone marrow and interfering with normal blood cell developme...
  • Six, to date; more soon. Outpatient bone marrow transplants, that is. Finding new ways to deliver quality care with the greatest benefit is a priority for a patient-centered institution like City of Hope. For example, not every bone marrow transplant patient needs to check into the hospital for treatment. In fa...
  • The best measure of success in the fight against cancer is in lives saved and families intact, in extra days made special simply because they exist. Yuman Fong, M.D., chair of the Department of Surgery at City of Hope, understands what precedes that special awareness. When cancer strikes, one minute a person ma...
  • In cancer, expertise matters. So do survival rates, patient safety, patient services and many other factors. City of Hope understands this, as does U.S.News & World Report. The magazine’s 2014-2015 list of best hospitals for cancer once again includes City of Hope, ranking the institution 12 out of 900 elig...
  • At 29, Kommah McDowell was a successful young professional engaged to be married to her best friend. She worked in the financial services sector and kick-boxed to keep in shape and to relax. Then came the diagnosis of triple-negative inflammatory breast cancer, a rare and very aggressive form of breast cancer. ...
  • The well-known drug tamoxifen might not always be the best choice for premenopausal women who have undergone treatment for breast cancer and face a heightened risk of recurrence. A new study suggests that the aromatase inhibitor exemestane, or Aromasin, works slightly better than tamoxifen in preventing cancer ...
  • At age 44, Bridget Hanchette, a mother of three from La Crosse, Wisconsin, was diagnosed with grade IV glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of malignant brain tumor. The cancer grows and spreads quickly, making it difficult to treat. Most patients with this diagnosis are not given much hope, but Hanchette’s i...
  • Survival rates for childhood cancer have improved tremendously over the past few decades, but postcancer care hasn’t always kept up. More children than ever are now coping with long-term complications and side effects caused by their disease and treatment — one of those being learning difficulties. A new ...
  • When Sheldon Querido, a retired manufacturer’s representative, was diagnosed with bladder cancer, his doctor told him that he’d need to have his bladder removed – and that he’d have to wear an external urine-collection bag for the rest of his life. “My first response was ‘I donR...
  • To stop smoking, two approaches might be better than one. A new study has found that using the medication varenicline, or Chantix – along with nicotine patches – was more effective than the medicine alone in helping people quit. The study, conducted by Stellanbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa, and pub...
  • John Cloer was three months shy of his third birthday in 2004 when he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For the next three and a half years, he received chemotherapy at City of Hope, finally obtaining long-term remission. His parents Bill and Gina, along with John and his younger brother Steve, r...
  • News about the risks or benefits of widespread cancer screening seem to arrive daily – 3D mammography for breast cancer, CT scans for lung cancer, PSA tests for prostate cancer and now pelvic exams for some women’s cancers. Missing in the headlines is a reflection of how cancer detection is evolving. Today’s ca...
  • Adults with sickle cell disease soon may have a new treatment option: bone marrow transplants. Children with sickle cell disease have been treated successfully with transplantation of bone marrow, more officially known as hematopoietic stem cells, from other people. But the procedure has been less successful in...
  • New pelvic exam recommendations or not, women shouldn’t give up those routine gynecological appointments. The revised guidelines from the American College of Physicians exempt most women from pelvic examinations, but a cancer specialist at City of Hope says women should still plan on regular visits with t...