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Urology Oncology Fellowship

The Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope offers one- and two-year Fellowships in Urologic Oncology/Robotic Surgery with special emphasis on minimally invasive and robotic techniques. The one-year program includes one year of clinical work, while the two-year program includes one year of research and one year of clinical work.  Clinical Fellows will have the opportunity to rotate at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena, in addition to their rotation at City of Hope.
 
City of Hope has had a tradition of training future urologic oncologic surgeons since 1992. Approximately 60 percent of our Fellows go on to careers in the academic setting.
 
Contact: Clayton S. Lau, M.D.
Director, Urologic Oncology Fellowship Program
Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000
Phone: 626-256-4673 ext. 65733
FAX: 626-301-8285
Email: cllau@coh.org


 
A request for additional information may be made to Denise Rasmussen through email drasmussen@coh.org or send to the address above.
 
Eligibility
Candidates must be graduates of an ACGME-accredited urology program. There are currently three to four one-year clinical Fellowship positions available for board eligible/certified urologists. In addition, we have recently expanded the Fellowship and offer two-year Fellowships for those interested in enriching their training in basic science and outcomes research.
The two-year Fellows will spend the first twelve months in a lab working on translational research projects in Urologic Oncology/Robotic Surgery.  The second twelve months will be spent in a clinical Urology service.  During the clinical year, the Fellows participate in over 1,000 laparoscopic/robotic procedures, provide care for in-patients including ICU care, and offer continuity of care in the outpatient clinics.
 
Responsibilities
The Fellow is responsible for all in-patient care and typically operates four days per week with any one of the four current urologic oncology faculty members.  All urologic oncology faculty are Fellowship-trained and members of the Society of Urologic Oncology. The Fellow is currently supported clinically by a nurse practitioner and a physician assistant.
 
Completion of this program also mandates that our Fellows present at national meetings, write research papers, get involved with clinical trials, participate in journal clubs, and present lectures to the oncologic community. Clinical Fellows will have the opportunity to rotate at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena in addition to their rotation at City of Hope.
 
Based on current occupancy levels, Fellows would be anticipated to participate in the surgical care and management of approximately 800 laparoscopic robotic radical prostatectomies; 75-80 laparoscopic cystoprostatectomies with urinary diversion; and 100-150 laparoscopic and robotic nephrectomies. A variety of other endoscopic, endourologic and general urology cases occur throughout the year.
 

While minimally invasive techniques are an important part of this program, our Fellows are also trained in complex open surgical techniques, such as post-chemotherapy RPLND’s, nephrectomies, open cystectomies and urinary tract reconstructions.  Because our Fellows train in a nationally recognized NCI-designated cancer center, they also have opportunities to participate in many multi-teamed procedures for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. Fellows are also exposed to a multidisciplinary treatment approach to urologic cancers by developing close relationships with radiation oncology, medical oncology, and uropathology.
 
City of Hope has one-year clinical and two-year research/clinical Fellowships available starting July 2015.  Interviews for these positions have been scheduled for January 2014.
 

Application Process

It is best to begin the application process about a year before your anticipated date of entry into the fellowship.
 
Interested parties should contact:
 
Denise Rasmussen
Fellowship Coordinator
Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology
City of Hope
Email: drasmussen@coh.org
Phone: 626.256.4673 ext. 65733
Fax: 626-301-8285

Please note that before an interview date is scheduled, City of Hope must receive:
 
  • Current curriculum vitae,
  • Two letters of reference from faculty in the candidate’s residency-training program
  • Photo
  • Interviews will take place in January of 2014.

Urology Oncology Fellowship

Urology Oncology Fellowship

The Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope offers one- and two-year Fellowships in Urologic Oncology/Robotic Surgery with special emphasis on minimally invasive and robotic techniques. The one-year program includes one year of clinical work, while the two-year program includes one year of research and one year of clinical work.  Clinical Fellows will have the opportunity to rotate at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena, in addition to their rotation at City of Hope.
 
City of Hope has had a tradition of training future urologic oncologic surgeons since 1992. Approximately 60 percent of our Fellows go on to careers in the academic setting.
 
Contact: Clayton S. Lau, M.D.
Director, Urologic Oncology Fellowship Program
Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000
Phone: 626-256-4673 ext. 65733
FAX: 626-301-8285
Email: cllau@coh.org


 
A request for additional information may be made to Denise Rasmussen through email drasmussen@coh.org or send to the address above.
 
Eligibility
Candidates must be graduates of an ACGME-accredited urology program. There are currently three to four one-year clinical Fellowship positions available for board eligible/certified urologists. In addition, we have recently expanded the Fellowship and offer two-year Fellowships for those interested in enriching their training in basic science and outcomes research.
The two-year Fellows will spend the first twelve months in a lab working on translational research projects in Urologic Oncology/Robotic Surgery.  The second twelve months will be spent in a clinical Urology service.  During the clinical year, the Fellows participate in over 1,000 laparoscopic/robotic procedures, provide care for in-patients including ICU care, and offer continuity of care in the outpatient clinics.
 
Responsibilities
The Fellow is responsible for all in-patient care and typically operates four days per week with any one of the four current urologic oncology faculty members.  All urologic oncology faculty are Fellowship-trained and members of the Society of Urologic Oncology. The Fellow is currently supported clinically by a nurse practitioner and a physician assistant.
 
Completion of this program also mandates that our Fellows present at national meetings, write research papers, get involved with clinical trials, participate in journal clubs, and present lectures to the oncologic community. Clinical Fellows will have the opportunity to rotate at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena in addition to their rotation at City of Hope.
 
Based on current occupancy levels, Fellows would be anticipated to participate in the surgical care and management of approximately 800 laparoscopic robotic radical prostatectomies; 75-80 laparoscopic cystoprostatectomies with urinary diversion; and 100-150 laparoscopic and robotic nephrectomies. A variety of other endoscopic, endourologic and general urology cases occur throughout the year.
 

While minimally invasive techniques are an important part of this program, our Fellows are also trained in complex open surgical techniques, such as post-chemotherapy RPLND’s, nephrectomies, open cystectomies and urinary tract reconstructions.  Because our Fellows train in a nationally recognized NCI-designated cancer center, they also have opportunities to participate in many multi-teamed procedures for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. Fellows are also exposed to a multidisciplinary treatment approach to urologic cancers by developing close relationships with radiation oncology, medical oncology, and uropathology.
 
City of Hope has one-year clinical and two-year research/clinical Fellowships available starting July 2015.  Interviews for these positions have been scheduled for January 2014.
 

Application Process

Application Process

It is best to begin the application process about a year before your anticipated date of entry into the fellowship.
 
Interested parties should contact:
 
Denise Rasmussen
Fellowship Coordinator
Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology
City of Hope
Email: drasmussen@coh.org
Phone: 626.256.4673 ext. 65733
Fax: 626-301-8285

Please note that before an interview date is scheduled, City of Hope must receive:
 
  • Current curriculum vitae,
  • Two letters of reference from faculty in the candidate’s residency-training program
  • Photo
  • Interviews will take place in January of 2014.
Fellowships and Residencies
City of Hope offers a number of exciting fellowships and residencies in laboratory cancer and diabetes research, administration, clinical applications and other areas.

City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
Students and professionals at City of Hope can access a plethora of medical databases, scientific journals, course materials, special collections, and other useful resources at our 12,000 square foot Lee Graff Library.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
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