A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
School of Radiation Therapy Bookmark and Share

School of Radiation Therapy

City of Hope's School of Radiation Therapy , established in 1975, is a 12-month certificate program, accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606, mail@jrcert.org,  www.jrcert.org and approved by the State of California, Department of Public Health, Radiologic Health Branch www.cdph.ca.gov/rhb.  The program is designed to offer a full curriculum that incorporates both didactic and clinical elements that are reflective of contemporary practice in radiation therapy today.

The program's mission is to educate and train radiation therapy professionals who are knowledgeable, technically competent and dedicated to the needs of their patients, the community and profession.

Successful preparation is through the program's ability to provide structural learning experiences that facilitate attitudes and skills that prepare graduates to demonstrate a commitment to patient care and continued personal and professional development.

Upon successful completion of the program, the student is eligible to sit for the national certification exam offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Having successfully passed this exam, the certificate holder is classified as a Registered Radiation Therapist, R.T.
 

 

 

Program Brochure and Application

Applicants must meet minimum admission requirements, which include graduation from a JRCERT accredited program in radiography and certification in radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the State of California, Department of Public Health. In addition, applicants must possess a minimum of an associate degree. (The degree does not need to be in the radiologic sciences)

Individuals interested in applying to the City of Hope  School of Radiation Therapy must submit an application by June 1st of each new program year.

Prior to student enrollment, City of Hope will conduct a professional background investigation.

For more information,  please view our program brochure
 
Tuition
Tuition for the school is $10,000 and is paid in 2 installments.

Payment Schedule

1st installment of $5,000 is due October 30th of each program year. 2nd installment of $5,000 is due April 30th of each program year.

Textbooks

Students are also responsible for the purchase of required textbooks. Cost of textbooks is approximately $300.

 

 

Program Goals and Effectiveness Outcomes

To uphold the mission of the program:
 
Students/Graduates will be clinical and didactically competent
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate technical skills in treatment set-ups
  • Students will practice radiation protection
 
Students/Graduates will communicate effectively
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate oral communication skills
  • Students will demonstrate written communication skills
  • Students will act in response to age specific and cultural needs
 
Students/Graduates will utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will recognize set-up discrepancies for simulation procedures
  • Students will recognize compromises relating to tumor control and tissue tolerances
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of on-board imaging skills
 
Students/Graduates will demonstrate professional and ethical behavior
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate professional work behavior
  • Students will recognize the benefits of professional membership

Program effectiveness outcomes
The performance of the program is reflected through program effectiveness data as defined by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) (20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182, 312-704-5300, www.jrcert.org, mail@jrcert.org).  Program effectiveness data includes the program completion rate, pass rate and job placement rate.  This information can be obtained at www.jrcert.org/resources/program-effectiveness-data.  Questions about the program effectiveness data should be directed to the Program Director.
 
Completion Rate - October 2013 through October 2014
This is an annual measurement of the number of students that began the program divided by the number of students that actually completed the program.  The program completion rate for 2014 was 100%.  Nine of the 9 students expected to complete the program in 2014 went on to complete the program that year.
 
Credentialing Examination Pass Rate - 2010 through 2014
This is the number of students that pass the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) certification examination on the first attempt within six months of graduation from the program.  The figure reflects an average over a five-year span.  The program's credentialing examination pass rate stated as an average from 2010 through 2014 is 100%.  Forty two of the 42 graduates taking the ARRT certification examination within six months of graduation pass on the first attempt.
 
Job Placement Rate - 2009 through 2013
This is the number of graduates employed in radiation therapy compared to the number of graduates actively seeking employment within six months of graduation.*  The figure reflects an average over a five-year span.  The program's five-year average job placements rate from 2009 through 2013 is 84%. Thirty six of the 43 graduates seeking employment were employed within 12 months of graduation.
 

Radiation Therapy

Radiation Therapy is the medical specialty that utilizes ionizing radiation in the treatment and cure of malignant disease. The Radiation Therapist is an integral member of the cancer management team and works in tandem with the Radiation Oncologist (physician specializing in cancer treatment) in delivering a prescribed course of radiation therapy. Responsibilities of the Radiation Therapist include localization of tumor volume (simulation), treatment planning (dosimetry), and the daily delivery of radiation treatments, as well as providing comfort and support to patients and their families.

The Radiation Therapist is a highly motivated and emotionally mature individual who has a sincere desire to be a member of the health care team. A high degree of accuracy, attention to detail and personal integrity is essential. The Radiation Therapist must be willing to accept responsibility and provide understanding and compassion to the patient and the issues they face in dealing with their illness.

To become a registered Radiation Therapist in the United States it is necessary to pass the national certification examination in Radiation Therapy offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Eligibility for this exam is achieved through successful completion from an accredited radiation therapy program.

Individuals wishing to enter City of Hope's School of Radiation Therapy must make application to the program and meet the established admission requirements .

 

 

 





 

 

Requirements and Selection Process

Requirements
Individuals interested in applying to the City of Hope School of Radiation Therapy must submit an application by June 1st of each new program year. Applicants must meet minimum admission requirements, which include graduation from a JRCERT accredited program in radiography and certification in radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the State of California Department of Public Health. In addition, applicants must possess a minimum of an associate degree.(The degree does not need to be in the radiologic sciences)

Specific admission requirements and prerequisites are published in the  program brochure .
 
Selection Process
Student selection is based on interviews, professional references and related academic performance. The interview and selection committee includes the Program Director, 1-2-faculty members.
 
Applicant interview and selection procedures are published in the  program brochure .

 

 

FERPA

What is FERPA?
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, commonly referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment, is a Federal law designed to protect the privacy of student education records.  The law applies to all educational institutions that receive federal funding for any program administered by the Secretary of Education.  Institutions that fail to comply with FERPA may have funds administered by the Secretary of Education withheld.  FERPA grants adult students (18 and older) the following rights:

• The right to inspect and review their educational records
• The right to seek the amendment of their educational records
• The right to consent to the disclosure of their educational records
• The right to obtain a copy of their school’s Student Records Policy
• The right to file a complaint with the FERPA Office in Washington, D.C.
 
FERPA Basics
 
• With only a few exceptions, student educational records are considered confidential and may not be released without the written consent of the student
• Faculty and staff members have a responsibility to protect student educational records
• Faculty and staff members may only access information that is needed for the legitimate completion of their official responsibilities
 
Who is a Student?
A student is any individual who is or has been in attendance at an educational institution or agency and for whom the agency or institution maintains educational records. 
 
What is an Educational Record?
An educational record is defined as any information or data that is directly related to a student and is maintained by an educational agency or institution or by a party acting for the agency or institution. Educational records include any information or data recorded in any medium, including but not limited to handwriting, print, tapes, film, e-mail, microfilm, and microfiche.   Examples of educational records include, but are not limited to the following:

• Academic evaluations, including student examination papers, transcripts, test scores, and other academic records
• General counseling and advising records
• Disciplinary records
• Financial aid records, including student loan collection records
• Admissions information for students who are accepted and enrolled
• Biographical information (date and place of birth, gender, nationality, race and ethnicity, and identification photographs)
• Course work including papers and exams, class schedules, as well as written, email or recorded communications that are part of the academic process

Educational records DO NOT include:

• Records relating to medical interns and residents
• Sole possession records, i.e., records/notes in sole possession of the maker, used only as a personal memory aid and not revealed or accessible to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the record (this might include notes an instructor makes while providing career/professional guidance to a student)
• Medical treatment records that include, but are not limited to, records maintained by physicians, psychiatrists, and psychologists
• Employment records when employment is not contingent on being a student, provided the record is used only in relation to the individual's employment
• Records created and maintained by a law enforcement unit used only for only that purpose, are revealed only to law enforcement agencies of the same jurisdiction, and the enforcement unit does not have access to education records
• Post-attendance records, i.e., information about a person that was obtained when the person was no longer a student (alumni records) and does not relate to the person as a student

Access to Information In Student Education Records
Under FERPA, Personally Identifiable Information (“PII”) in an education record generally falls into two categories: (1) Directory Information, and (2) information that may not be released without prior written consent from the student. 
 
Directory Information
Directory information is information that may be disclosed without student consent.  City of Hope has designated the following items as directory information.  Students can request that their Directory Information be withheld (see Restricting Release of Directory Information, below).

• Student name
• Dates of attendance
• Status (full time or part-time)
• Degree(s) received
• Honors and awards received
• Expected dates of graduation
• Address
• Telephone listing
• Electronic mail address
• Photograph
• Date and place of birth
• Major field of study
• Grade level
• Participation in officially recognized activities and sports
• Most recent educational agency or institution attended
 
Information That Cannot Be Released Without Student Consent
Examples of personally identifiable information that MAY NOT BE RELEASED without prior written consent of the student include, but are not limited to:

• Social Security Number
• Student number
• Religious affiliation
• Citizenship
• Ethnicity
• Gender
• Grade Point Average (GPA)
• Marital status

FERPA Exceptions
However, Personally Identifiable Information may be released, without student consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions:

• School officials with a legitimate educational interest
• Other schools to which a student is transferring
• Government officials for audit or evaluation purposes
• Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student
• Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school
• Accrediting organizations
• To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena
• Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies
• State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law
• To the parents of the student where the student is a dependant for tax purposes

Comments/Questions
Questions or comments related to FERPA should be directed to the Program Director.
Christine Forell, Educational Program Director
City of Hope School of Radiation Therapy
City of Hope National Medical Center
1500 East Duarte Rd
Duarte, CA 91010

Filing a Complaint
Students have a right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by City of Hope to comply with the requirements of FERPA at the address below:

Family Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
 

School of Radiation Therapy

School of Radiation Therapy

City of Hope's School of Radiation Therapy , established in 1975, is a 12-month certificate program, accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606, mail@jrcert.org,  www.jrcert.org and approved by the State of California, Department of Public Health, Radiologic Health Branch www.cdph.ca.gov/rhb.  The program is designed to offer a full curriculum that incorporates both didactic and clinical elements that are reflective of contemporary practice in radiation therapy today.

The program's mission is to educate and train radiation therapy professionals who are knowledgeable, technically competent and dedicated to the needs of their patients, the community and profession.

Successful preparation is through the program's ability to provide structural learning experiences that facilitate attitudes and skills that prepare graduates to demonstrate a commitment to patient care and continued personal and professional development.

Upon successful completion of the program, the student is eligible to sit for the national certification exam offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Having successfully passed this exam, the certificate holder is classified as a Registered Radiation Therapist, R.T.
 

 

 

Program Brochure and Application

Program Brochure and Application

Applicants must meet minimum admission requirements, which include graduation from a JRCERT accredited program in radiography and certification in radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the State of California, Department of Public Health. In addition, applicants must possess a minimum of an associate degree. (The degree does not need to be in the radiologic sciences)

Individuals interested in applying to the City of Hope  School of Radiation Therapy must submit an application by June 1st of each new program year.

Prior to student enrollment, City of Hope will conduct a professional background investigation.

For more information,  please view our program brochure
 
Tuition
Tuition for the school is $10,000 and is paid in 2 installments.

Payment Schedule

1st installment of $5,000 is due October 30th of each program year. 2nd installment of $5,000 is due April 30th of each program year.

Textbooks

Students are also responsible for the purchase of required textbooks. Cost of textbooks is approximately $300.

 

 

Program Goals and Program Effectiveness Outcomes

Program Goals and Effectiveness Outcomes

To uphold the mission of the program:
 
Students/Graduates will be clinical and didactically competent
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate technical skills in treatment set-ups
  • Students will practice radiation protection
 
Students/Graduates will communicate effectively
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate oral communication skills
  • Students will demonstrate written communication skills
  • Students will act in response to age specific and cultural needs
 
Students/Graduates will utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will recognize set-up discrepancies for simulation procedures
  • Students will recognize compromises relating to tumor control and tissue tolerances
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of on-board imaging skills
 
Students/Graduates will demonstrate professional and ethical behavior
Student Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will demonstrate professional work behavior
  • Students will recognize the benefits of professional membership

Program effectiveness outcomes
The performance of the program is reflected through program effectiveness data as defined by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) (20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182, 312-704-5300, www.jrcert.org, mail@jrcert.org).  Program effectiveness data includes the program completion rate, pass rate and job placement rate.  This information can be obtained at www.jrcert.org/resources/program-effectiveness-data.  Questions about the program effectiveness data should be directed to the Program Director.
 
Completion Rate - October 2013 through October 2014
This is an annual measurement of the number of students that began the program divided by the number of students that actually completed the program.  The program completion rate for 2014 was 100%.  Nine of the 9 students expected to complete the program in 2014 went on to complete the program that year.
 
Credentialing Examination Pass Rate - 2010 through 2014
This is the number of students that pass the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) certification examination on the first attempt within six months of graduation from the program.  The figure reflects an average over a five-year span.  The program's credentialing examination pass rate stated as an average from 2010 through 2014 is 100%.  Forty two of the 42 graduates taking the ARRT certification examination within six months of graduation pass on the first attempt.
 
Job Placement Rate - 2009 through 2013
This is the number of graduates employed in radiation therapy compared to the number of graduates actively seeking employment within six months of graduation.*  The figure reflects an average over a five-year span.  The program's five-year average job placements rate from 2009 through 2013 is 84%. Thirty six of the 43 graduates seeking employment were employed within 12 months of graduation.
 

Radiation Therapy

Radiation Therapy

Radiation Therapy is the medical specialty that utilizes ionizing radiation in the treatment and cure of malignant disease. The Radiation Therapist is an integral member of the cancer management team and works in tandem with the Radiation Oncologist (physician specializing in cancer treatment) in delivering a prescribed course of radiation therapy. Responsibilities of the Radiation Therapist include localization of tumor volume (simulation), treatment planning (dosimetry), and the daily delivery of radiation treatments, as well as providing comfort and support to patients and their families.

The Radiation Therapist is a highly motivated and emotionally mature individual who has a sincere desire to be a member of the health care team. A high degree of accuracy, attention to detail and personal integrity is essential. The Radiation Therapist must be willing to accept responsibility and provide understanding and compassion to the patient and the issues they face in dealing with their illness.

To become a registered Radiation Therapist in the United States it is necessary to pass the national certification examination in Radiation Therapy offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Eligibility for this exam is achieved through successful completion from an accredited radiation therapy program.

Individuals wishing to enter City of Hope's School of Radiation Therapy must make application to the program and meet the established admission requirements .

 

 

 





 

 

Requirements and Selection Process

Requirements and Selection Process

Requirements
Individuals interested in applying to the City of Hope School of Radiation Therapy must submit an application by June 1st of each new program year. Applicants must meet minimum admission requirements, which include graduation from a JRCERT accredited program in radiography and certification in radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and the State of California Department of Public Health. In addition, applicants must possess a minimum of an associate degree.(The degree does not need to be in the radiologic sciences)

Specific admission requirements and prerequisites are published in the  program brochure .
 
Selection Process
Student selection is based on interviews, professional references and related academic performance. The interview and selection committee includes the Program Director, 1-2-faculty members.
 
Applicant interview and selection procedures are published in the  program brochure .

 

 

FERPA

FERPA

What is FERPA?
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, commonly referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment, is a Federal law designed to protect the privacy of student education records.  The law applies to all educational institutions that receive federal funding for any program administered by the Secretary of Education.  Institutions that fail to comply with FERPA may have funds administered by the Secretary of Education withheld.  FERPA grants adult students (18 and older) the following rights:

• The right to inspect and review their educational records
• The right to seek the amendment of their educational records
• The right to consent to the disclosure of their educational records
• The right to obtain a copy of their school’s Student Records Policy
• The right to file a complaint with the FERPA Office in Washington, D.C.
 
FERPA Basics
 
• With only a few exceptions, student educational records are considered confidential and may not be released without the written consent of the student
• Faculty and staff members have a responsibility to protect student educational records
• Faculty and staff members may only access information that is needed for the legitimate completion of their official responsibilities
 
Who is a Student?
A student is any individual who is or has been in attendance at an educational institution or agency and for whom the agency or institution maintains educational records. 
 
What is an Educational Record?
An educational record is defined as any information or data that is directly related to a student and is maintained by an educational agency or institution or by a party acting for the agency or institution. Educational records include any information or data recorded in any medium, including but not limited to handwriting, print, tapes, film, e-mail, microfilm, and microfiche.   Examples of educational records include, but are not limited to the following:

• Academic evaluations, including student examination papers, transcripts, test scores, and other academic records
• General counseling and advising records
• Disciplinary records
• Financial aid records, including student loan collection records
• Admissions information for students who are accepted and enrolled
• Biographical information (date and place of birth, gender, nationality, race and ethnicity, and identification photographs)
• Course work including papers and exams, class schedules, as well as written, email or recorded communications that are part of the academic process

Educational records DO NOT include:

• Records relating to medical interns and residents
• Sole possession records, i.e., records/notes in sole possession of the maker, used only as a personal memory aid and not revealed or accessible to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the record (this might include notes an instructor makes while providing career/professional guidance to a student)
• Medical treatment records that include, but are not limited to, records maintained by physicians, psychiatrists, and psychologists
• Employment records when employment is not contingent on being a student, provided the record is used only in relation to the individual's employment
• Records created and maintained by a law enforcement unit used only for only that purpose, are revealed only to law enforcement agencies of the same jurisdiction, and the enforcement unit does not have access to education records
• Post-attendance records, i.e., information about a person that was obtained when the person was no longer a student (alumni records) and does not relate to the person as a student

Access to Information In Student Education Records
Under FERPA, Personally Identifiable Information (“PII”) in an education record generally falls into two categories: (1) Directory Information, and (2) information that may not be released without prior written consent from the student. 
 
Directory Information
Directory information is information that may be disclosed without student consent.  City of Hope has designated the following items as directory information.  Students can request that their Directory Information be withheld (see Restricting Release of Directory Information, below).

• Student name
• Dates of attendance
• Status (full time or part-time)
• Degree(s) received
• Honors and awards received
• Expected dates of graduation
• Address
• Telephone listing
• Electronic mail address
• Photograph
• Date and place of birth
• Major field of study
• Grade level
• Participation in officially recognized activities and sports
• Most recent educational agency or institution attended
 
Information That Cannot Be Released Without Student Consent
Examples of personally identifiable information that MAY NOT BE RELEASED without prior written consent of the student include, but are not limited to:

• Social Security Number
• Student number
• Religious affiliation
• Citizenship
• Ethnicity
• Gender
• Grade Point Average (GPA)
• Marital status

FERPA Exceptions
However, Personally Identifiable Information may be released, without student consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions:

• School officials with a legitimate educational interest
• Other schools to which a student is transferring
• Government officials for audit or evaluation purposes
• Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student
• Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school
• Accrediting organizations
• To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena
• Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies
• State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law
• To the parents of the student where the student is a dependant for tax purposes

Comments/Questions
Questions or comments related to FERPA should be directed to the Program Director.
Christine Forell, Educational Program Director
City of Hope School of Radiation Therapy
City of Hope National Medical Center
1500 East Duarte Rd
Duarte, CA 91010

Filing a Complaint
Students have a right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by City of Hope to comply with the requirements of FERPA at the address below:

Family Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
 
Health Professional Education
We offer an innovative series of educational programs for health professionals such as nurses, social workers, psychologists, chaplains, radiation therapists, pharmacists and cancer researchers.

City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
Students and professionals at City of Hope can access a plethora of medical databases, scientific journals, course materials, special collections, and other useful resources at our 12,000 square foot Lee Graff Library.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Cancer cells are voracious eaters. Like a swarm of locusts, they devour every edible tidbit they can find. But unlike locusts, when the food is gone, cancer cells can’t just move on to the next horn o’ plenty. They have to survive until more food shows up — and they do. Mei Kong, Ph.D., assistant […]
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Repr...
  • When 25-year-old Angelina Mattos was diagnosed with Stage 4 oral cancer earlier this year, she learned that her only hope of survival was through the removal of her tongue, a surgery that leaves people without the ability to talk or eat normally, sometimes permanently ending their ability to speak. After hearin...
  • Two years ago, Joselyn Miller and her family sat together as stem cells from her brother’s bone marrow were infused into her – a precious gift of life that the family is excited to have the chance to pass to another patient in need. Today, the stem cell recipient is healthy. Her 23-year-old son Rex, who […...
  • Even as the overall rate of oral cancers in the United States steadily declines, the rate of tongue cancer is increasing — especially among white females ages 18 to 44. An oral cancer diagnosis, although rare, is serious. Only half of the people diagnosed with oral cancer are still alive after five years, accor...
  • Sometimes cancer found in the lungs is not lung cancer at all. It can be another type of cancer that originated elsewhere in the body and spread, or metastasized, to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These tumors are called lung metastases, or metastatic cancer to the lungs, and are not the...
  • When it comes to research into the treatment of hematologic cancers, City of Hope scientists stand out. One study that  they presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology suggests a new standard of care for HIV-associated lymphoma, another offers promise for the treatment of re...
  • Patients with HIV-associated lymphoma may soon have increased access to the current standard of care for some non-HIV infected patients – autologous stem cell transplants. Impressive new data, presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Francisco, indicate that HIV-...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
  • The holidays can create an overwhelming urge to give to people in need — especially to sick children and families spending the holidays in a hospital room. That’s a good thing. Holiday donations of toys and gifts can bolster the spirits, and improve the lives, of people affected by illness, and hospitals ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
  • Cancer has a way of “talking” to the immune system and corrupting it to work on its own behalf instead of defending the body. Blocking this communication would allow the immune system to see cancer cells for what they are – something to be fought off – and stop them from growing. A breakthrough Scientists [R...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...