A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Health Professional Education

Just as City of Hope offers continuing medical education for physicians, we also offer an innovative series of educational programs for other health professionals such as nurses, social workers, psychologists, chaplains, radiation therapists, pharmacists and cancer researchers. Participants in continuing education programs accumulate Continuing Education Unit, or (CEU), credits, while our other programs award certificates at successful completion of the curricula.

Health professionals who enroll in City of Hope’s educational programs gain access to the full array of interdisciplinary resources on the City of Hope campus. Continuing education programs ensure that practicing professionals are kept up to date on the latest research findings and novel therapeutics. Health professionals such as radiation therapists or cancer genetics researchers, for example, will find that obtaining a certificate from City of Hope is invaluable to launching their chosen career.
 
City of Hope’s Division of Nursing Research and Education conducts interdisciplinary research organized around the quality of life and symptom management of oncology patients. Studies conducted in the department extend across the trajectory of disease, from diagnosis and treatment to survivorship and end-of-life care and involve physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and chaplains. The findings of this research are disseminated through multiple courses offered throughout the year to health professionals from across the country.
 
The Cancer Genetics Career Development Program is a mentored faculty position focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. A rigorous, two-year program encompassing both didactic training and clinical experience, its goal is to create leaders in clinical cancer genetics research.
 
Continuing Pharmacy Education
Because of an ever-burgeoning pharmacopoeia, especially in the field of oncology, it is imperative for pharmacists and nurses to keep current on new drug therapies. Our continuing pharmacy education program offers Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education-sanctioned CEU credits for its periodic seminars and events.
 
The Cancer Genetics Education Program of the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers a CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Radiation therapy, in addition to being standard first-line treatment in many cases, is increasingly employed as part of combination treatment protocols prior to or following chemotherapy and/or surgery. City of Hope’s School of Radiation Therapy is a fully-accredited program for those seeking careers as radiation therapists. Students who successfully complete the program receive a certificate as a registered radiation therapist.
 
Clinical Practice and Education (City of Hope employees only)
Clinical Practice and Educationprovides educational opportunities that enhance the practice of the patient care staff here at the City of Hope. CPE manages and maintains the data that documents the competence of these direct care providers, and conducts outcome evaluations that support clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice.
 

Health Professional Education

Health Professional Education

Just as City of Hope offers continuing medical education for physicians, we also offer an innovative series of educational programs for other health professionals such as nurses, social workers, psychologists, chaplains, radiation therapists, pharmacists and cancer researchers. Participants in continuing education programs accumulate Continuing Education Unit, or (CEU), credits, while our other programs award certificates at successful completion of the curricula.

Health professionals who enroll in City of Hope’s educational programs gain access to the full array of interdisciplinary resources on the City of Hope campus. Continuing education programs ensure that practicing professionals are kept up to date on the latest research findings and novel therapeutics. Health professionals such as radiation therapists or cancer genetics researchers, for example, will find that obtaining a certificate from City of Hope is invaluable to launching their chosen career.
 
City of Hope’s Division of Nursing Research and Education conducts interdisciplinary research organized around the quality of life and symptom management of oncology patients. Studies conducted in the department extend across the trajectory of disease, from diagnosis and treatment to survivorship and end-of-life care and involve physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and chaplains. The findings of this research are disseminated through multiple courses offered throughout the year to health professionals from across the country.
 
The Cancer Genetics Career Development Program is a mentored faculty position focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. A rigorous, two-year program encompassing both didactic training and clinical experience, its goal is to create leaders in clinical cancer genetics research.
 
Continuing Pharmacy Education
Because of an ever-burgeoning pharmacopoeia, especially in the field of oncology, it is imperative for pharmacists and nurses to keep current on new drug therapies. Our continuing pharmacy education program offers Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education-sanctioned CEU credits for its periodic seminars and events.
 
The Cancer Genetics Education Program of the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers a CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Radiation therapy, in addition to being standard first-line treatment in many cases, is increasingly employed as part of combination treatment protocols prior to or following chemotherapy and/or surgery. City of Hope’s School of Radiation Therapy is a fully-accredited program for those seeking careers as radiation therapists. Students who successfully complete the program receive a certificate as a registered radiation therapist.
 
Clinical Practice and Education (City of Hope employees only)
Clinical Practice and Educationprovides educational opportunities that enhance the practice of the patient care staff here at the City of Hope. CPE manages and maintains the data that documents the competence of these direct care providers, and conducts outcome evaluations that support clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice.
 
Health Professional Education
We offer an innovative series of educational programs for health professionals such as nurses, social workers, psychologists, chaplains, radiation therapists, pharmacists and cancer researchers.

City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
Students and professionals at City of Hope can access a plethora of medical databases, scientific journals, course materials, special collections, and other useful resources at our 12,000 square foot Lee Graff Library.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Although chemotherapy can be effective in treating cancer, it can also exact a heavy toll on a patient’s health. One impressive alternative researchers have found is in the form of a vaccine. A type of immunotherapy, one part of the vaccine primes the body to react strongly against a tumor; the second part dire...
  • The breast cancer statistic is attention-getting: One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. That doesn’t mean that, if you’re one of eight women at a dinner table, one of you is fated to have breast cancer (read more on that breast cancer statistic), but it does mean that the ...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. In his first post, ...
  • Advanced age tops the list among breast cancer risk factor for women. Not far behind is family history and genetics. Two City of Hope researchers delving deep into these issues recently received important grants to advance their studies. Arti Hurria, M.D., director of the Cancer and Aging Research Program, and ...
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...
  • The leading risk factor for breast cancer is simply being a woman. The second top risk factor is getting older. Obviously, these two factors cannot be controlled, which is why all women should be aware of their risk and how to minimize those risks. Many risk factors can be mitigated, and simple changes can lead...
  • All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. Although white women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, African-American women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethni...
  • First, the good news: HIV infections have dropped dramatically over the past 30 years. Doctors, researchers and health officials have made great strides in preventing and treating the disease, turning what was once a death sentence into, for some, a chronic condition. Now, the reality check: HIV is still a worl...
  • Screening for breast cancer has dramatically increased the number of cancers found before they cause symptoms – catching the disease when it is most treatable and curable. Mammograms, however, are not infallible. It’s important to conduct self-exams, and know the signs and symptoms that should be checked by a h...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free.   In his previ...
  • In a single day, former professional triathlete Lisa Birk learned she couldn’t have children and that she had breast cancer. “Where do you go from there?” she asks. For Birk, who swims three miles, runs 10 miles and cycles every day, the answer  ultimately was a decision to take control of her cancer care. Afte...
  • More and more people are surviving cancer, thanks to advanced cancer treatments and screening tools. Today there are nearly 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. But in up to 20 percent of cancer patients, the disease ultimately spreads to their brain. Each year, nearly 170,000 new cases of brain ...