A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Women's Cancers

The power of collaboration and a dedication to compassion
 
The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope brings together medical doctors and laboratory researchers from across City of Hope who are committed to increasing our understanding of the risks for developing breast and gynecologic (uterus, ovary, and cervix) cancers, developing novel strategies for treatment and prevention, and improving the lives of patients. These unique collaborations result in the rapid translation of scientific discoveries into more effective treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers.
 
 
Changing our patients' lives today

Our research serves as the foundation for developing new treatments for women diagnosed with cancer. Educating women about risk reduction, disease management, and post-treatment care is a major element of the program. We offer a wide range of clinical services, including screening/imaging/diagnostic approaches; genetic counseling and risk assessment; multidisciplinary therapeutic interventions including surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and reconstructive surgery procedures; rehabilitation and supportive care; long-term follow-up care; and prevention strategies.
 
We are the only women’s cancers program in the country to offer a biopsychosocial approach to care. We focus not just on the disease but on the biological, psychological and social factors that play a significant role in the lives of women battling cancer.
 
The Women's Cancers Program at City of Hope is among only a few in the nation to offer minimally invasive robotic surgery using the da Vinci S HD Surgical System. This robotic surgical approach offers greater accuracy, smaller incisions, less postoperative pain and faster healing.
 
We are among a few women’s cancers programs in the country to routinely use intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy to treat certain types of gynecologic cancer, which can greatly improve the outcomes for women with advanced disease.

Our patients are given the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. We are constantly evaluating new drugs and developing better treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers, designed to improve the likelihood of a cure. Many of these new treatment approaches are available only at City of Hope.

The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope, one of the largest in Southern California, continues to grow to meet the need for highly specialized and leading cancer care. We are at the forefront of breast and gynecologic cancer treatment and research, and we take a comprehensive and aggressive approach to provide the most advanced treatments available.

Care continues after treatment

Our doctors and researchers are working to develop resources to help improve the lives of women after treatment, and all patients are able to participate in ongoing long-term research that focuses on life after cancer.
 

Support this program

We deliver exquisite care at the leading edge of cancer treatment. It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts - and those of our supporters today -- have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables City of Hope to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies - helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact:

Janet Morgan

Senior Director
Phone: 213-241-7250
Email: jmorgan@coh.org

 
 

Women's Cancers

Women's Cancers

The power of collaboration and a dedication to compassion
 
The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope brings together medical doctors and laboratory researchers from across City of Hope who are committed to increasing our understanding of the risks for developing breast and gynecologic (uterus, ovary, and cervix) cancers, developing novel strategies for treatment and prevention, and improving the lives of patients. These unique collaborations result in the rapid translation of scientific discoveries into more effective treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers.
 
 
Changing our patients' lives today

Our research serves as the foundation for developing new treatments for women diagnosed with cancer. Educating women about risk reduction, disease management, and post-treatment care is a major element of the program. We offer a wide range of clinical services, including screening/imaging/diagnostic approaches; genetic counseling and risk assessment; multidisciplinary therapeutic interventions including surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and reconstructive surgery procedures; rehabilitation and supportive care; long-term follow-up care; and prevention strategies.
 
We are the only women’s cancers program in the country to offer a biopsychosocial approach to care. We focus not just on the disease but on the biological, psychological and social factors that play a significant role in the lives of women battling cancer.
 
The Women's Cancers Program at City of Hope is among only a few in the nation to offer minimally invasive robotic surgery using the da Vinci S HD Surgical System. This robotic surgical approach offers greater accuracy, smaller incisions, less postoperative pain and faster healing.
 
We are among a few women’s cancers programs in the country to routinely use intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy to treat certain types of gynecologic cancer, which can greatly improve the outcomes for women with advanced disease.

Our patients are given the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. We are constantly evaluating new drugs and developing better treatments for breast and gynecologic cancers, designed to improve the likelihood of a cure. Many of these new treatment approaches are available only at City of Hope.

The Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope, one of the largest in Southern California, continues to grow to meet the need for highly specialized and leading cancer care. We are at the forefront of breast and gynecologic cancer treatment and research, and we take a comprehensive and aggressive approach to provide the most advanced treatments available.

Care continues after treatment

Our doctors and researchers are working to develop resources to help improve the lives of women after treatment, and all patients are able to participate in ongoing long-term research that focuses on life after cancer.
 

Support This Program

Support this program

We deliver exquisite care at the leading edge of cancer treatment. It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts - and those of our supporters today -- have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables City of Hope to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies - helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact:

Janet Morgan

Senior Director
Phone: 213-241-7250
Email: jmorgan@coh.org

 
 
Quick Links
The Positive Image Center is where licensed cosmetologists support and assist patients with building and maintaining self-confidence in their appearance. Patients can access wig fittings and stylings and discuss cosmetic techniques.
 
Cooper Finkel Women’s Health Center
Many gynecological cancer and breast cancer  services at City of Hope are provided at the Rita Cooper Finkel and J. William Finkel Women's Health Center. Here, women receive the highest quality care, whether seeking prevention and screening services or coping with a cancer diagnosis.
Physicians in the United States and throughout the world are welcome to refer patients to City of Hope.

There are a number of options you can choose from to refer a patient:

  • Call 800-826-HOPE (4673) to speak with a patient referral specialist.
  • Fax the patient face sheet to 626-301-8432
  • Complete an online callback request form
 
Clinical Trials
Our aggressive pursuit to discover better ways to help patients now – not years from now – places us among the leaders worldwide in the administration of clinical trials.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
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