A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Cancer Care Outcomes Data

Patient survival outcomes presented in this website have been compared to national statistics.  Our team of doctors, nurses and scientists produce outstanding results and we stand more determined than ever to find new treatments and cures for cancer.  The goal of curing cancer isn’t just something we work at.  It’s what we live for.
 

Breast Cancer Survival

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, we’re ahead of the curve in providing better options that can lead to higher survival rates.  These options include surgical, medical and radiation therapies.
 
City of Hope is one of the few hospitals providing the latest advances in radiation therapy for breast cancer patients — intraoperative radiation therapy, or IORT. During surgery, patients receive a concentrated dose of precise radiation, rather than the normal follow up plan of six to eight weeks of daily radiation treatments.  IORT allows one day as opposed to six to eight weeks of daily radiation, with the exact same excellent results.
 
In addition, we have an extensive research program for women with breast cancer with more than 20 clinical trials, to help women find the right treatment for them.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The chart below compares survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had breast cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates for patients treated at other cancer programs that report to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 
 

Prostate Cancer Survival

Cancer of the prostate gland is a serious health risk for men. In fact, this year more than 238,000 American men will be diagnosed. The good news is that prostate cancer is the most survivable form of cancer in men, especially if it is detected early, before it can spread.
 
As a patient at City of Hope, your odds of surviving prostate cancer are excellent. Our innovative treatment options and technologies can help you recover faster, with fewer side effects.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The charts below compare survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had stage II or III prostate cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rate of patients treated at other cancer programs that report their data to the Commission on Cancer (CoC).  For Stages I and IV Prostate Cancer, there is insufficient data to track survivorship.
 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
Survivorship is of utmost importance at City of Hope, yet quality-of-life is equally important.  The statistics below provide insight to continence and potency after surgery for prostate cancer at City of Hope.

Time to Continence
 
a) Greater than 90% of men less than 65 years of age achieve bladder control within one year.
b) Median time to achieve bladder control is 1.5 months after catheter removal.
c) Of all men who have prostatectomy, only 2% require a procedure to achieve bladder control.

Time to Potency

a) Approximately 73% of all patients are potent at two years.
b) Approximately 87% of men less than 55 years of age are potent at two years.
c) Approximately 75% of men 55-64 years of age are potent at two years.
 
 
 

Colon Cancer Survival

City of Hope brings together the most advanced resources to manage the treatment of patients with either early or advanced colorectal cancers. Our multidisciplinary team includes gastroenterologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists and surgical oncologists working cooperatively to create the most effective treatment plan.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The charts below compare survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had stage III or IV colon cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates of patients treated at other cancer programs that report their data to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). For Stages I and II Colon Cancer, there is insufficient data to track survivorship over a five year period.
 
 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 

HCT Volumes

City of Hope is a leader in the field of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and one of the world’s largest and most successful transplant centers.
 
City of Hope participates in a data and outcomes reporting program led by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Center (CIBMTR) through which we provide transplant data on an ongoing basis. According to a published report by the CIBMTR, in 2013 City of Hope was again reported to be an over-performing transplant center based on one-year survival.  We are the only transplant center in the United States to do so for nine consecutive reporting years.
 
The number of stem cell and marrow transplants done at City of Hope is provided in the tables below, by year and type.
 
 

Patient Satisfaction

City of Hope strives to give patients the best care. Everyone on our staff believes that patients and their families are their first priority. And we’re always trying to get even better.

Feedback is important to City of Hope. Patients help us improve our care. These two charts show how satisfied patients feel about our service.

Inpatient satisfaction at City of Hope is much higher than the national average. Outpatient satisfaction is greater than the average at other cancer centers.

 

City of Hope received both the Guardian of Excellence Award and the Beacon of Excellence Award in November, 2013. The Guardian of Excellence Award honors hospitals that have reached the 95th percentile for patient satisfaction. The award is given annually based on a single year of data. City of Hope received the former Summit Award the past four years, making this the fifth consecutive year City of Hope received this honor for its top performance.

 

The Beacon of Excellence Award, given to institutions that have maintained consistently high levels of excellence in patient satisfaction for three years and in employee engagement, physician engagement or clinical quality performance for two years. City of Hope was one of only 26 institutions in the nation recognized for patient satisfaction.
 
 
 
 
 
 
*C4QI = the Comprehensive Cancer Center Consortium for Quality Improvement, a group of 19 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers.
 
About Press Ganey:
Press Ganey has been the industry's recognized leader in health care performance improvement. Press Ganey works with more than 10,000 health care organizations nationwide, including 50% of all U.S hospitals, to improve clinical and business outcomes. Press Ganey surveys inpatients and outpatients after discharge about a variety of topics related to their stay, including general satisfaction with the hospital’s services, speediness of admission, room cleanliness and staff courtesy. Scores are then compiled, analyzed and compared with those from other facilities of similar size.

 

 

Cancer Care Outcomes Data

Cancer Care Outcomes Data

Patient survival outcomes presented in this website have been compared to national statistics.  Our team of doctors, nurses and scientists produce outstanding results and we stand more determined than ever to find new treatments and cures for cancer.  The goal of curing cancer isn’t just something we work at.  It’s what we live for.
 

Breast Cancer Survivorship

Breast Cancer Survival

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, we’re ahead of the curve in providing better options that can lead to higher survival rates.  These options include surgical, medical and radiation therapies.
 
City of Hope is one of the few hospitals providing the latest advances in radiation therapy for breast cancer patients — intraoperative radiation therapy, or IORT. During surgery, patients receive a concentrated dose of precise radiation, rather than the normal follow up plan of six to eight weeks of daily radiation treatments.  IORT allows one day as opposed to six to eight weeks of daily radiation, with the exact same excellent results.
 
In addition, we have an extensive research program for women with breast cancer with more than 20 clinical trials, to help women find the right treatment for them.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The chart below compares survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had breast cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates for patients treated at other cancer programs that report to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

Prostate Cancer Survival

Cancer of the prostate gland is a serious health risk for men. In fact, this year more than 238,000 American men will be diagnosed. The good news is that prostate cancer is the most survivable form of cancer in men, especially if it is detected early, before it can spread.
 
As a patient at City of Hope, your odds of surviving prostate cancer are excellent. Our innovative treatment options and technologies can help you recover faster, with fewer side effects.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The charts below compare survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had stage II or III prostate cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rate of patients treated at other cancer programs that report their data to the Commission on Cancer (CoC).  For Stages I and IV Prostate Cancer, there is insufficient data to track survivorship.
 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
Survivorship is of utmost importance at City of Hope, yet quality-of-life is equally important.  The statistics below provide insight to continence and potency after surgery for prostate cancer at City of Hope.

Time to Continence
 
a) Greater than 90% of men less than 65 years of age achieve bladder control within one year.
b) Median time to achieve bladder control is 1.5 months after catheter removal.
c) Of all men who have prostatectomy, only 2% require a procedure to achieve bladder control.

Time to Potency

a) Approximately 73% of all patients are potent at two years.
b) Approximately 87% of men less than 55 years of age are potent at two years.
c) Approximately 75% of men 55-64 years of age are potent at two years.
 
 
 

Colon Cancer Survivorship

Colon Cancer Survival

City of Hope brings together the most advanced resources to manage the treatment of patients with either early or advanced colorectal cancers. Our multidisciplinary team includes gastroenterologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists and surgical oncologists working cooperatively to create the most effective treatment plan.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The charts below compare survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had stage III or IV colon cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates of patients treated at other cancer programs that report their data to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). For Stages I and II Colon Cancer, there is insufficient data to track survivorship over a five year period.
 
 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 

HCT Volumes

HCT Volumes

City of Hope is a leader in the field of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and one of the world’s largest and most successful transplant centers.
 
City of Hope participates in a data and outcomes reporting program led by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Center (CIBMTR) through which we provide transplant data on an ongoing basis. According to a published report by the CIBMTR, in 2013 City of Hope was again reported to be an over-performing transplant center based on one-year survival.  We are the only transplant center in the United States to do so for nine consecutive reporting years.
 
The number of stem cell and marrow transplants done at City of Hope is provided in the tables below, by year and type.
 
 

Patient Satisfaction

Patient Satisfaction

City of Hope strives to give patients the best care. Everyone on our staff believes that patients and their families are their first priority. And we’re always trying to get even better.

Feedback is important to City of Hope. Patients help us improve our care. These two charts show how satisfied patients feel about our service.

Inpatient satisfaction at City of Hope is much higher than the national average. Outpatient satisfaction is greater than the average at other cancer centers.

 

City of Hope received both the Guardian of Excellence Award and the Beacon of Excellence Award in November, 2013. The Guardian of Excellence Award honors hospitals that have reached the 95th percentile for patient satisfaction. The award is given annually based on a single year of data. City of Hope received the former Summit Award the past four years, making this the fifth consecutive year City of Hope received this honor for its top performance.

 

The Beacon of Excellence Award, given to institutions that have maintained consistently high levels of excellence in patient satisfaction for three years and in employee engagement, physician engagement or clinical quality performance for two years. City of Hope was one of only 26 institutions in the nation recognized for patient satisfaction.
 
 
 
 
 
 
*C4QI = the Comprehensive Cancer Center Consortium for Quality Improvement, a group of 19 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers.
 
About Press Ganey:
Press Ganey has been the industry's recognized leader in health care performance improvement. Press Ganey works with more than 10,000 health care organizations nationwide, including 50% of all U.S hospitals, to improve clinical and business outcomes. Press Ganey surveys inpatients and outpatients after discharge about a variety of topics related to their stay, including general satisfaction with the hospital’s services, speediness of admission, room cleanliness and staff courtesy. Scores are then compiled, analyzed and compared with those from other facilities of similar size.

 

 
Clinics/Treatments/Services
As a Comprehensive Cancer Center – the highest designation given by the National Cancer Institute – we are widely regarded as a leader in cancer prevention and treatment.
 

Refer a Patient
Physicians can choose a number of options to refer a patient:

  • Call 800-826-HOPE (4673) to speak with a patient referral specialist.
  • Fax the patient face sheet to 626-301-8432
  • Complete an online callback request form
 
Cancer Prevention
City of Hope combines compassionate care with the best and most innovative science. Our 100+ acre campus is designed to meet the full range of needs of our patients and families. This guide is designed to help you take advantage of all that is offered at City of Hope - Duarte.
To make an appointment for yourself, a family member or a friend, please complete and submit our Become a Patient Request Form, or call City of Hope at
800-826-HOPE (4673).
Contact Us
Phone: (800) 826-HOPE (4673)
 
Hours: M – F, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (PST)
 
Calls received after 5 p.m. will be returned the next business day.
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