A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Annual Report

2012 Annual Report
As world class providers of cancer treatments and cures, fueled by the leading research of our Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope’s financial results allow us to focus on fulfilling our mission and meeting the future with strength and optimism.
 
 

2010 Annual Report

Education guides progress at City of Hope

Good scientists make discoveries that add to the world’s knowledge base. Great scientists make sure that others can carry on and apply that knowledge.

At City of Hope, education is a central part of the mission to battle serious disease. By teaching others — from young students to experienced physicians — City of Hope expands its reach far beyond the laboratory bench or operating room.

Whether they are high school students first exploring scientific research or college students putting their coursework into practice, young learners benefit from City of Hope’s hands-on enrichment programs. City of Hope investigators train physicians to become experts in biomedicine, so they can turn research advances into better patient care. And City of Hope’s education programs for patients and family members provide practical information that boosts quality of life.

These benefits extend far beyond City of Hope. Community health fairs educate the public about disease prevention and early detection. Physicians around the world attend City of Hope medical courses to learn the latest practices and techniques.
Whether in the lab or the classroom, City of Hope is using the power of knowledge to transform the future of medicine.

In the pages of this report, we invite you to learn more about how City of Hope’s educational programs are writing the future of medicine, one student at a time.
 
 
 
 

2009 Annual Report

At City of Hope, thousands of professionals make it their personal mission to fight life-threatening diseases every day. From clinics to classrooms, scientists and medical experts unite to make progress againstcancer,diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other serious conditions.
 
It takes an inclusive strategy to battle a complex condition like cancer. Each type of cancer is different, and each tumor is unique to each individual. Beating the disease requires a team that covers the field, from molecular biologists and laboratory technicians to oncologists, nurses and community educators.
 
City of Hope knows what it takes to better detect, treat and prevent cancer: It means bringing together the best people, resources and ideas. This is what puts the “comprehensive” in City of Hope’s comprehensive cancer center — and what drives the men and women at City of Hope to keep striving for more.
 
 

2008 Annual Report

City of Hope is built on a foundation of compassion, innovation and sense of urgency to find cures for cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other serious diseases. Our 2008 annual report highlights the many connections that extend City of Hope into the community and throughout the world. New research discoveries connect our scientists and physicians to one another and to investigators across the nation — and globe —to test promising therapies through clinical trials. A culture of compassion spurs the deep connections that tie nurses, therapists and other health professionals to patients and their families. The connections we have made over decades with our thousands of volunteers and donors nationwide provide the funding to make our work possible. The report documents notable events and connections in 2008, including our 25 years as a Beckman Research Institute.
 

2007 Annual Report

City of Hope is built on a foundation of compassion, innovation and sense of urgency. Home to many renowned scientists and physicians, we foster groundbreaking solutions in the areas ofcancer,diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other serious diseases. As shown in our current annual report, the shared vision of our entire team, from researchers to supporters, touches the lives of patients everywhere. From designing smarter drugs to developing genetic therapies, we are on a daily quest to bring new hope to those who need it most.
 

2006 Annual Report

City of Hope is built on a foundation of compassion, innovation and sense of urgency. Home to many renowned scientists and physicians, we foster groundbreaking solutions in the areas of cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other serious diseases. As shown in our current annual report, the shared vision of our entire team, from researchers to supporters, touches the lives of patients everywhere. From designing smarter drugs to developing genetic therapies, we are on a daily quest to bring new hope to those who need it most.
 
 
Welcome to City of Hope
City of Hope is a new model of cancer center, focused on rapidly transforming scientific discoveries into better treatments and better prevention strategies for cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases.

About City of Hope
City of Hope Locations

Learn about the talented individuals who are leading City of Hope towards the next horizon of treatments and cures for life-threatening diseases.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Cancer cells may be known for their uncontrollable growth and spread, but they also differ from normal tissue in another manner: how they produce energy. In healthy cells, energy is derived primarily from aerobic respiration, an oxygen-requiring process that extracts the maximum possible energy from glucose, or...
  • Clinical trials are expensive and complex, but they’re essential for bringing new therapies to patients. Edward Newman, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular pharmacology, just boosted City of Hope’s ability to conduct those studies with a five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute...
  • Meet City of Hope’s new chair of the Department of Surgery – esteemed pancreatic and hepatobiliary surgeon, researcher and author Yuman Fong, M.D. As one of today’s most respected and recognizable physicians in the treatment of cancers of the liver, bile duct, gallbladder and pancreas, Fong has pioneered and en...
  • For most of her life, Southern California teenager Kayla Saikaly described herself as healthy, even very healthy. She played basketball. She never missed school with as much as a fever. Her worst childhood illness was nothing more than a cold. Then, when she was 13, her nose started bleeding after a basketball ...
  • Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. But those odds may improve soon, thanks to a new comp...
  • For breast cancer survivors, a common worry is a recurrence of their cancer. Currently, these patients are screened with regular mammograms, but there’s no way to tell who is more likely to have a recurrence and who is fully cleared of her cancer. A new blood test – reported in Cancer Research, a journal of the...
  • Metastasis — the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor site to other parts of the body — generally leads to poorer outcomes for patients, so oncologists and researchers are constantly seeking new ways to detect and thwart this malicious process. Now City of Hope researchers may have identified a substa...
  • Deodorant, plastic bottles, grilled foods, artificial sweeteners, soy products … Do any of these products really cause cancer? With so many cancer myths and urban legends out there, why not ask the experts? They can debunk cancer myths while sharing cancer facts that matter, such as risk factors, preventi...
  • Cancer risk varies by ethnicity, as does the risk of cancer-related death. But the size of those differences can be surprising, highlighting the health disparities that exist among various ethnic groups in the United States. Both cancer incidence and death rates for men are highest among African-Americans, acco...
  • George Winston, known worldwide for his impressionistic, genre-defying music, considers music to be his first language, and admits he often stumbles over words – especially when he attempts languages other than English. There’s one German phrase he’s determined to perfect, however: danke schön. Winston thinks h...
  • Few decisions are more important than those involving health care, and few decisions can have such lasting impact, not only on oneself but on relatives and loved ones. Those choices, especially, should be made in advance – carefully, deliberately, free of pain and stress, and with much weighing of values and pr...
  • Using a card game to make decisions about health care, especially as those decisions relate to the end of life, would seem to be a poor idea. It isn’t. The GoWish Game makes those overwhelming, but all-important decisions not just easy, but natural. On each card of the 36-card deck is listed what seriously ill,...
  • Young adults and adolescents with cancer face unique challenges both during their treatment and afterward. Not only are therapies for children and older adults not always appropriate for them, they also must come to terms with the disease and treatment’s impact on their relationships, finances, school or ...
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer, other than skin cancer, among women in the United States. It’s also the second-leading cause of cancer death, behind lung cancer. In the past several years, various task force recommendations and studies have questioned the benefits of broad screening guidelines fo...
  • Paternal age and the health effects it has on potential offspring have been the focus of many studies, but few have examined the effect parental age has on the risk of adult-onset hormone-related cancers (breast cancer, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer). A team of City of Hope researchers, lead by Yani Lu,...