A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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School Program at City of Hope

School is an important part of life for children, teens, and young adults. The School Program at City of Hope helps patients to continue life through socialization and continued academic progress during treatment and recovery.
 
City of Hope’s School Program helps children, teens, and young adults:
 
 
  • Remain normal by keeping pace with their peers
  • Increase self-esteem through opportunities for achievement
  • Provide motivation to stay socially and mentally engaged
  • Reduce depression and anxiety associated with treatment
  • Smooth transitions back to school after treatment
 
The School Program provides services for all phases of education, including:

 

  • Preschool
  • Elementary school
  • Middle/High school
  • College
  • Vocational studies
 
The School Program helps to coordinate:

 

  • Hospital tutoring
  • Home instruction
  • School re-entry
  • Student and parent advocacy
  • Special accommodations
  • Neuropsychological testing
  • Community resources and referrals
 
All students at City of Hope are encouraged to participate in our School Program. For more information please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator, at 626-256-4673 ext. 62282, send an email to schoolprogram@coh.org or ask any member of your medical team.
 

School Program - Hospital Tutoring

Hospital tutoring is available to inpatients in K-12th grade during the school year. City of Hope’s School Program works in collaboration with the Duarte Unified School District to provide patients with tailored, one-on-one tutoring to meet patients’ educational needs. In one-hour daily, private tutoring sessions, certified Hospital Tutors help patients continue their education while at City of Hope. Hospital Tutors work with the patient’s local school to create a plan of study and provide the necessary text books if home text books are unavailable. Daily progress logs and a student progress report are provided to local school districts when patients return to their home schools.

The Hospital Tutors that work with City of Hope are California certified teachers hired by the Duarte Unified School District. They also teach at Duarte Unified School District schools and have many years of standard teaching and hospital tutoring experience.

There are several reasons to consider hospital tutoring. Hospital tutoring benefits patients by promoting:
 
  • Normalcy
  • Emotional Support
  • Positive adjustment to the hospital setting
  • Motivation to continue learning
  • Opportunities for students to catch up or get ahead in their school work
  • Distraction through focus on academic success

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What is hospital tutoring?

All inpatients grades K-12th who are eligible for hospital tutoring during the school year. Hospital tutors from the Duarte Unified School District tutor each of our K-12th grade patients privately, one hour a day, Monday-Friday on school days. Hospital tutoring provides patients with normalcy and a distraction from hospital life. Additionally, tutoring by veteran teachers helps patients continue to develop mentally and catch up, stay on track, and sometimes even get ahead in their studies. Hospital tutoring makes the transition to home instruction and/or school after hospital discharge a more enjoyable and smoother process for patients.

Who provides hospital instruction?

City of Hope's School Program Coordinator coordinates tutoring for students in K-12th grade. Hospital tutors are certified teachers hired by the Duarte Unified School District. Hospital Tutors at City of Hope have many, many years of school teaching and hospital tutoring experience.

When is a good time to start hospital instruction?

City of Hope believes that children, teens, and young adults adjust better to the hospital setting by starting hospital instruction as soon as possible. Our School Program Coordinator meets with patient and parents in the first few days of admission to assess for educational needs and to arrange tutoring. Tutoring is coordinated to meet the patient's medical, emotional, and educational needs. Tutoring sessions provide patients with daily routine and educational activities that complement their primary focus on treatment while hospitalized.

How can I prepare for hospital tutoring?

We suggest bringing all text books with you to the hospital. Tutors can work with your local school's curriculum to help you stay on track and make returning to your local school as smooth as possible. If you are unable to bring text books, Hospital Tutors will provide text books from the Duarte Unified School District.

Is hospital tutoring too much for pediatric patients?

We believe that patients do better at the hospital when they are able to make their lives as normal as possible. Hospital Tutors help patients increase their spirits and provide patients opportunities for accomplishments and increased self-esteem. Hospital Tutors at City of Hope are experienced professionals and understand how to help patients balance their school work in the hospital setting.

School Program - Home Instruction

Many patients at City of Hope use home instruction before returning to school. K-12th grade students who are unable to attend school can receive alternative education in their homes through their local school districts. City of Hope’s School Program helps patients and parents coordinate home instruction through their local school district and assists families to advocate for special accommodations if necessary.

We strongly suggest that families consider home instruction for the time between discharge and returning to school.

Home instruction is a critical way to provide K-12th graders with:
 
  • Hope
  • Increased normalcy
  • Continued intellectual growth
  • Smoother transitions back into school after treatment

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What is home instruction?

Home instruction is for children, teens, and young adults eligible for K-12 education who are unable to attend school. Different school districts offer different forms of alternative education, many including home instruction. Often times, school districts provide one-on-one tutoring in the home or independent study options for students unable to attend school.

Who provides home instruction?

Your local school district is responsible to provide alternative education by California Certified Teachers for K-12th grade students unable to attend school. City of Hope's School Program Coordinator can help get you in contact with the right personnel in your local district to begin home instruction.

How do I start home instruction?

Contact our School Program Coordinator to start the process. Each school district is different, but most students will need to enroll in their local district and also have a medical letter written by their City of Hope doctor describing the medical need for home instruction. Our School Program Coordinator is glad to arrange for these letters and send the paper work to your local school district. Give us a call and we'll help you get started.

When should we start home instruction?

Treatment and healing are different for each patient. Our School Program Coordinator will consult with your City of Hope medical team to help you to determine the best timing for you and your family. We have found most patients do best when they start home instruction sooner rather than later because it provides patients with motivation and creates opportunities for accomplishment, normalcy, and increased self esteem. Home instruction is also a critical component to successfully returning to school when ready.

School Program - School Re-entry

Re-entering the classroom is an important and exciting milestone for many children, teens and young adults who take a medical leave of absence from school. Our program helps patients adjust more quickly to the classroom upon returning to school. Patients often find this experience to be positive, energizing and self-esteem building. The classroom is a critical outlet for patients to socialize and re-establish their identity as a student with their peers.

Your medical team and School Program Coordinator can work with you to determine the best time to re-enter school and make it a smooth transition.

Some services offered by our School Program to families re-entering the school system include:
  • Coordinating re-entry services between the hospital, school and family
  • Providing medical letters to schools
  • Educating school faculty about potential medical and psychological effects of treatment and recovery
  • Educating fellow students about cancer and other medical conditions through school presentations
  • Facilitating and attending special accommodation meetings at schools with family and school staff

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What do I need to do in order to return to school?

Our School Program Coordinator can help you start this process. Often times, patients need to reenroll in their local school. If you have previously been in hospital tutoring or home instruction, the School Program Coordinator can help you and your family walk through the steps to return to your local school. Often times many students choose to inform their school administration of their previous medical treatment and how it currently impacts their school experience. If any special accommodations are needed, we can help advocate for these services as well.

When should I go back to school?

Treatment and healing are different for each patient. Our School Program Coordinator will consult with your City of Hope medical team to help you and your family decide when is best for you to return to school. We have found that most patients do best with a gradual, but prompt return to their local school, because it provides patients with socialization, normalcy, accomplishment, and increased self-esteem.

My child doesn't want to go back to school. What can I do?

Finding excuses to miss school could be a sign that your child is struggling with some part of going back. If your child can tell you whiy there are problems at school, you may want to meet with the school teacher, counselor, and principal to see what can be done to address these concerns. For example, they might suggest shorter days for the child who has fatigue, or they might come up with a plan that combines time at school and home tutoring.  It is best to find ways for your child to be in school at least part of the time, since school lets your child be with other kids and find a routine that works.
 
Older kids and teens may not want to go back to school because they look different, or because their long absences have changed their social standing with friends.  If treatment has changed the way they learn, that can also be frustrating and hard to deal with. Again, extra support at home and at school can help with the transition back to school. COH's School Program Coordinator, school nurses, and school counselors can help prepare your child's teacher and classmates for a successful return to school. 

My child isn't sure what to say to peers. How can I help?

Talk with your child about going back to school and about being ready for questions classmates may have about cancer. Explain to your child that friends may not understand much about cancer, and may say and ask some strange things. Some typical questions are: "What is cancer?", "Are you going to die?", "Can I catch it?", and "Can you still play?" Talk with your child about how to answer each of these questions. COH's School Program Coordinator is also available to speak with you or your child to help address these concerns and work with your child's school to assist with re-entry.
 
Some children are happy to know that they can respond to many questions without a long explanation. For instance, they may say:
  • Thanks for asking, but it's kind of hard to talk about this at school.
  • I don't know the answer to that question.
  • Maybe you can ask the teacher or the nurse about that.

Depending on the situation, your child might want to use one of these answers then change the subject in a friendly way, maybe with talk about school, an offer to play, or another topic.

Some teens may want to know where they can go to take a break at school or get support if they need it. Others may not want to seem different from their friends, so they don't want to do anything that singles them out. As with younger children, it helps for teens to talk with a parent or counselor about answering questions in a way that feels right for them. Some may choose not to talk about their cancer at school, while others may want to be ready with quick and easy answers for common questions or comments. Every child has their own communication style. Helping your child figure out what feels best before returning to school will help your child deal with questions in his or her own way.

Special Accommodations

For some patients, treatments for cancer and other blood disorders can cause short-term or long-term side effects. These changes can make school more difficult for some patients. The School Program can help students secure the special services they need to promote their educational success.
 
Some side effects of treatment that can make school re-entry challenging include:
 
  • Becoming tired more easily
  • Physical activity limitations
  • Lowered immune function
  • Difficulty remembering, concentrating and learning new material
  • Depression, anxiety and isolation
 
The School Program can help patients and their families address some of these concerns through:
 
  • Attending school meetings as a hospital representative and advocate
  • Advocating for Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and 504 Plans that legally protect special accommodations for students
  • Educational counseling and case management services
  • Educational referrals for community resources
  • Coordinating referrals for neuropsychological testing
 
For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.

 

 

Scholarship Information

Continuing education can be expensive! But many organizations and foundations give scholarships to students in treatment and recovery for cancer and other blood disorders.
 
Cancer-specific scholarshiplistings include:
 
Finaid.org - Information about scholarships, including ones specifically for cancer patients, cancer survivors, children of a patient or survivor, and others touched by cancer or pursuing a career in cancer treatment.
 
Scholarships.com - Information on college scholarships
 
StupidCancer.org - A support organization for the young adults who have, or have had, cancer.
 
Bleeding disorder scholarship listings include:
 
 
Also:
 
Don’t forget non-cancer related scholarships. Many scholarships out there can help reduce the cost of school. Resources include:
 
FinAid.org - A broad guide to student financial aid.
 
FAFSA.gov - Free Application for Federal Student Aid, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.
 
Please note that scholarship availability can change at the discretion of each organization and listing. Please double check with these organizations before finalizing your educational plan. Additionally, please contact our School Program if you have any questions or additional leads for scholarship information. We are always on the look out for additional scholarship resources!

 

 

For Educators

Coordinated involvement of teachers and school administrators is critical for the educational success of students undergoing medical treatment and recovery. Our pediatric medical and supportive care team at City of Hope strongly believes that patients benefit immensely from the continued education and socialization that the school system provides. We look forward to working with you to help these students move forward in their education and development.

Contact our School Program Coordinator with any questions you may have regarding a student undergoing medical treatment or recovery.

City of Hope’s School Program provides the following services to help your students continue in educational success:
 
  • Re-entry service coordination between the hospital, school and family
  • Medical letters from physicians
  • Educational materials and information for school faculty and staff about the medical and psychological effects of treatment and recovery
  • On-site school presentations for fellow students
  • IEP and 504 recommendation assistance and hospital staff representation during on-site school planning meetings
 
Please let us know how we can be of assistance. It is our goal to help your students thrive academically and developmentally throughout their treatment and recovery.

 

 

Contact the School Program at City of Hope

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 
City of Hope Campus
 
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000
626-256-HOPE (4673)
800-826-HOPE (4673)
http://www.cityofhope.org/

School Program

School Program at City of Hope

School is an important part of life for children, teens, and young adults. The School Program at City of Hope helps patients to continue life through socialization and continued academic progress during treatment and recovery.
 
City of Hope’s School Program helps children, teens, and young adults:
 
 
  • Remain normal by keeping pace with their peers
  • Increase self-esteem through opportunities for achievement
  • Provide motivation to stay socially and mentally engaged
  • Reduce depression and anxiety associated with treatment
  • Smooth transitions back to school after treatment
 
The School Program provides services for all phases of education, including:

 

  • Preschool
  • Elementary school
  • Middle/High school
  • College
  • Vocational studies
 
The School Program helps to coordinate:

 

  • Hospital tutoring
  • Home instruction
  • School re-entry
  • Student and parent advocacy
  • Special accommodations
  • Neuropsychological testing
  • Community resources and referrals
 
All students at City of Hope are encouraged to participate in our School Program. For more information please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator, at 626-256-4673 ext. 62282, send an email to schoolprogram@coh.org or ask any member of your medical team.
 

Hospital Tutoring

School Program - Hospital Tutoring

Hospital tutoring is available to inpatients in K-12th grade during the school year. City of Hope’s School Program works in collaboration with the Duarte Unified School District to provide patients with tailored, one-on-one tutoring to meet patients’ educational needs. In one-hour daily, private tutoring sessions, certified Hospital Tutors help patients continue their education while at City of Hope. Hospital Tutors work with the patient’s local school to create a plan of study and provide the necessary text books if home text books are unavailable. Daily progress logs and a student progress report are provided to local school districts when patients return to their home schools.

The Hospital Tutors that work with City of Hope are California certified teachers hired by the Duarte Unified School District. They also teach at Duarte Unified School District schools and have many years of standard teaching and hospital tutoring experience.

There are several reasons to consider hospital tutoring. Hospital tutoring benefits patients by promoting:
 
  • Normalcy
  • Emotional Support
  • Positive adjustment to the hospital setting
  • Motivation to continue learning
  • Opportunities for students to catch up or get ahead in their school work
  • Distraction through focus on academic success

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What is hospital tutoring?

All inpatients grades K-12th who are eligible for hospital tutoring during the school year. Hospital tutors from the Duarte Unified School District tutor each of our K-12th grade patients privately, one hour a day, Monday-Friday on school days. Hospital tutoring provides patients with normalcy and a distraction from hospital life. Additionally, tutoring by veteran teachers helps patients continue to develop mentally and catch up, stay on track, and sometimes even get ahead in their studies. Hospital tutoring makes the transition to home instruction and/or school after hospital discharge a more enjoyable and smoother process for patients.

Who provides hospital instruction?

City of Hope's School Program Coordinator coordinates tutoring for students in K-12th grade. Hospital tutors are certified teachers hired by the Duarte Unified School District. Hospital Tutors at City of Hope have many, many years of school teaching and hospital tutoring experience.

When is a good time to start hospital instruction?

City of Hope believes that children, teens, and young adults adjust better to the hospital setting by starting hospital instruction as soon as possible. Our School Program Coordinator meets with patient and parents in the first few days of admission to assess for educational needs and to arrange tutoring. Tutoring is coordinated to meet the patient's medical, emotional, and educational needs. Tutoring sessions provide patients with daily routine and educational activities that complement their primary focus on treatment while hospitalized.

How can I prepare for hospital tutoring?

We suggest bringing all text books with you to the hospital. Tutors can work with your local school's curriculum to help you stay on track and make returning to your local school as smooth as possible. If you are unable to bring text books, Hospital Tutors will provide text books from the Duarte Unified School District.

Is hospital tutoring too much for pediatric patients?

We believe that patients do better at the hospital when they are able to make their lives as normal as possible. Hospital Tutors help patients increase their spirits and provide patients opportunities for accomplishments and increased self-esteem. Hospital Tutors at City of Hope are experienced professionals and understand how to help patients balance their school work in the hospital setting.

Home Instruction

School Program - Home Instruction

Many patients at City of Hope use home instruction before returning to school. K-12th grade students who are unable to attend school can receive alternative education in their homes through their local school districts. City of Hope’s School Program helps patients and parents coordinate home instruction through their local school district and assists families to advocate for special accommodations if necessary.

We strongly suggest that families consider home instruction for the time between discharge and returning to school.

Home instruction is a critical way to provide K-12th graders with:
 
  • Hope
  • Increased normalcy
  • Continued intellectual growth
  • Smoother transitions back into school after treatment

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What is home instruction?

Home instruction is for children, teens, and young adults eligible for K-12 education who are unable to attend school. Different school districts offer different forms of alternative education, many including home instruction. Often times, school districts provide one-on-one tutoring in the home or independent study options for students unable to attend school.

Who provides home instruction?

Your local school district is responsible to provide alternative education by California Certified Teachers for K-12th grade students unable to attend school. City of Hope's School Program Coordinator can help get you in contact with the right personnel in your local district to begin home instruction.

How do I start home instruction?

Contact our School Program Coordinator to start the process. Each school district is different, but most students will need to enroll in their local district and also have a medical letter written by their City of Hope doctor describing the medical need for home instruction. Our School Program Coordinator is glad to arrange for these letters and send the paper work to your local school district. Give us a call and we'll help you get started.

When should we start home instruction?

Treatment and healing are different for each patient. Our School Program Coordinator will consult with your City of Hope medical team to help you to determine the best timing for you and your family. We have found most patients do best when they start home instruction sooner rather than later because it provides patients with motivation and creates opportunities for accomplishment, normalcy, and increased self esteem. Home instruction is also a critical component to successfully returning to school when ready.

School Re-entry

School Program - School Re-entry

Re-entering the classroom is an important and exciting milestone for many children, teens and young adults who take a medical leave of absence from school. Our program helps patients adjust more quickly to the classroom upon returning to school. Patients often find this experience to be positive, energizing and self-esteem building. The classroom is a critical outlet for patients to socialize and re-establish their identity as a student with their peers.

Your medical team and School Program Coordinator can work with you to determine the best time to re-enter school and make it a smooth transition.

Some services offered by our School Program to families re-entering the school system include:
  • Coordinating re-entry services between the hospital, school and family
  • Providing medical letters to schools
  • Educating school faculty about potential medical and psychological effects of treatment and recovery
  • Educating fellow students about cancer and other medical conditions through school presentations
  • Facilitating and attending special accommodation meetings at schools with family and school staff

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 

What do I need to do in order to return to school?

Our School Program Coordinator can help you start this process. Often times, patients need to reenroll in their local school. If you have previously been in hospital tutoring or home instruction, the School Program Coordinator can help you and your family walk through the steps to return to your local school. Often times many students choose to inform their school administration of their previous medical treatment and how it currently impacts their school experience. If any special accommodations are needed, we can help advocate for these services as well.

When should I go back to school?

Treatment and healing are different for each patient. Our School Program Coordinator will consult with your City of Hope medical team to help you and your family decide when is best for you to return to school. We have found that most patients do best with a gradual, but prompt return to their local school, because it provides patients with socialization, normalcy, accomplishment, and increased self-esteem.

My child doesn't want to go back to school. What can I do?

Finding excuses to miss school could be a sign that your child is struggling with some part of going back. If your child can tell you whiy there are problems at school, you may want to meet with the school teacher, counselor, and principal to see what can be done to address these concerns. For example, they might suggest shorter days for the child who has fatigue, or they might come up with a plan that combines time at school and home tutoring.  It is best to find ways for your child to be in school at least part of the time, since school lets your child be with other kids and find a routine that works.
 
Older kids and teens may not want to go back to school because they look different, or because their long absences have changed their social standing with friends.  If treatment has changed the way they learn, that can also be frustrating and hard to deal with. Again, extra support at home and at school can help with the transition back to school. COH's School Program Coordinator, school nurses, and school counselors can help prepare your child's teacher and classmates for a successful return to school. 

My child isn't sure what to say to peers. How can I help?

Talk with your child about going back to school and about being ready for questions classmates may have about cancer. Explain to your child that friends may not understand much about cancer, and may say and ask some strange things. Some typical questions are: "What is cancer?", "Are you going to die?", "Can I catch it?", and "Can you still play?" Talk with your child about how to answer each of these questions. COH's School Program Coordinator is also available to speak with you or your child to help address these concerns and work with your child's school to assist with re-entry.
 
Some children are happy to know that they can respond to many questions without a long explanation. For instance, they may say:
  • Thanks for asking, but it's kind of hard to talk about this at school.
  • I don't know the answer to that question.
  • Maybe you can ask the teacher or the nurse about that.

Depending on the situation, your child might want to use one of these answers then change the subject in a friendly way, maybe with talk about school, an offer to play, or another topic.

Some teens may want to know where they can go to take a break at school or get support if they need it. Others may not want to seem different from their friends, so they don't want to do anything that singles them out. As with younger children, it helps for teens to talk with a parent or counselor about answering questions in a way that feels right for them. Some may choose not to talk about their cancer at school, while others may want to be ready with quick and easy answers for common questions or comments. Every child has their own communication style. Helping your child figure out what feels best before returning to school will help your child deal with questions in his or her own way.

Special Accommodations

Special Accommodations

For some patients, treatments for cancer and other blood disorders can cause short-term or long-term side effects. These changes can make school more difficult for some patients. The School Program can help students secure the special services they need to promote their educational success.
 
Some side effects of treatment that can make school re-entry challenging include:
 
  • Becoming tired more easily
  • Physical activity limitations
  • Lowered immune function
  • Difficulty remembering, concentrating and learning new material
  • Depression, anxiety and isolation
 
The School Program can help patients and their families address some of these concerns through:
 
  • Attending school meetings as a hospital representative and advocate
  • Advocating for Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and 504 Plans that legally protect special accommodations for students
  • Educational counseling and case management services
  • Educational referrals for community resources
  • Coordinating referrals for neuropsychological testing
 
For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.

 

 

Scholarships

Scholarship Information

Continuing education can be expensive! But many organizations and foundations give scholarships to students in treatment and recovery for cancer and other blood disorders.
 
Cancer-specific scholarshiplistings include:
 
Finaid.org - Information about scholarships, including ones specifically for cancer patients, cancer survivors, children of a patient or survivor, and others touched by cancer or pursuing a career in cancer treatment.
 
Scholarships.com - Information on college scholarships
 
StupidCancer.org - A support organization for the young adults who have, or have had, cancer.
 
Bleeding disorder scholarship listings include:
 
 
Also:
 
Don’t forget non-cancer related scholarships. Many scholarships out there can help reduce the cost of school. Resources include:
 
FinAid.org - A broad guide to student financial aid.
 
FAFSA.gov - Free Application for Federal Student Aid, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.
 
Please note that scholarship availability can change at the discretion of each organization and listing. Please double check with these organizations before finalizing your educational plan. Additionally, please contact our School Program if you have any questions or additional leads for scholarship information. We are always on the look out for additional scholarship resources!

 

 

For Educators

For Educators

Coordinated involvement of teachers and school administrators is critical for the educational success of students undergoing medical treatment and recovery. Our pediatric medical and supportive care team at City of Hope strongly believes that patients benefit immensely from the continued education and socialization that the school system provides. We look forward to working with you to help these students move forward in their education and development.

Contact our School Program Coordinator with any questions you may have regarding a student undergoing medical treatment or recovery.

City of Hope’s School Program provides the following services to help your students continue in educational success:
 
  • Re-entry service coordination between the hospital, school and family
  • Medical letters from physicians
  • Educational materials and information for school faculty and staff about the medical and psychological effects of treatment and recovery
  • On-site school presentations for fellow students
  • IEP and 504 recommendation assistance and hospital staff representation during on-site school planning meetings
 
Please let us know how we can be of assistance. It is our goal to help your students thrive academically and developmentally throughout their treatment and recovery.

 

 

Contact

Contact the School Program at City of Hope

For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, MSW, School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
 
City of Hope Campus
 
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000
626-256-HOPE (4673)
800-826-HOPE (4673)
http://www.cityofhope.org/
Quick Links
Living with Cancer

Here you will find tips, tools and resources to help you and your family cope with the issues that arise during and after cancer treatment.

Supportive Care Calendar
City of Hope | Duarte offers an integrated array of cancer support services and resources through the Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center.
The Positive Image Center is where licensed cosmetologists support and assist patients with building and maintaining self-confidence in their appearance. Patients can access wig fittings and stylings and discuss cosmetic techniques.
 
City of Hope’s School Program helps children, teen, and young adult patients continue their education while undergoing treatment. For more information, please contact Kayla Fulginiti, M.S.W., School Program Coordinator at 626-256-4673, ext. 62282.
Advance Directive Information
 
 
Click here for more information about our program.


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  • As breast cancer survivors know, the disease’s impact lingers in ways both big and small long after treatment has ended. A new study suggests that weight gain – and a possible corresponding increase in heart disease and diabetes risk – may be part of that impact. In the first study to evaluate weight chan...
  • Becoming what’s known as an independent scientific researcher is no small task, especially when working to translate research into meaningful health outcomes. Yet that independent status is vital, enabling researchers to lead studies and avenues of inquiry that they believe to be promising. Clinicians, especial...
  • 720 days. That’s how long Alex Tung, 38, had to give up surfing after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. For most people, even some surfers, such a hiatus wouldn’t be a big deal, but for Tung, surfing has been everything. The Southern California resident began surfing when he was in elemen...
  • There are few among us who have not experienced loss of a friend or loved one, often without warning, or like those of us who care for people with cancer, after a lingering illness. It is a time when emotions run high and deep, and as time passes from the moment of loss, we often […]
  • For the past four years, neurosurgeon and scientist Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D., has been studying how breast cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to the brain, where they become life-threatening tumors. Known as secondary brain tumors, these cancers have become increasingly common as treatment advances have ena...
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin. A primary symptom is a rash that arises initially in areas of the skin that are not normally exposed to sunlight....
  • There’s science camp, and then there’s “mystery” science camp. City of Hope’s new science camp for middle school students is of the especially engaging latter variety. From Monday, July 13, to Friday, July 17, rising middle-school students from across the San Gabriel Valley were presented with a “patient” with ...
  • Women diagnosed with breast cancer quickly learn their tumor’s type, meaning the characteristics that fuel its growth. That label guides the treatment of their disease, as well as their prognosis when it comes to treatment effectiveness. Sometimes, however, doctors can’t accurately predict treatment effectivene...
  • In years past, Bladder Cancer Awareness Month has been a sobering reminder of a disease with few treatment options. For patients with metastatic disease (disease that has spread from the bladder to distant organs), average survival is typically just over one year. Fortunately, things are changing. Academic inst...
  • Tina Wang was diagnosed with Stage 4 diffuse large b cell lymphoma at age 22. She first sought treatment at her local hospital, undergoing two cycles of treatment. When the treatment failed to eradicate her cancer, she came to City of Hope. Here, Wang underwent an autologous stem cell transplant and participate...