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Schones, Dustin E., Ph.D. Laboratory Bookmark and Share

Laboratory of Dustin E. Schones, Ph.D.

Our lab is generally interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation and how other regulatory elements interact with chromatin. In addition to this, we are interested in how genetic variation interacts with epigenetic variation in the development of diseases such as diabetes and cancer. We utilize an integrative approach, combining experimental and computational methods, to study these problems.
 
One area of the lab is focused on the basic biology of mechanisms responsible for regulating chromatin architecture. We have identified characteristic chromatin patterns at functional regulatory regions of the genome, including promoter and distal enhancer regions. We are furthermore tracking changes in nucleosome positions along various lineage commitment pathways and investigating what mechanisms are responsible for regulating chromatin changes as well as how the changes in chromatin influence other regulatory events.
 
In addition, we are exploring the interaction of epigenetic and genetic variation in mouse models of cancer and diabetes. Genome-wide profiles of chromatin modifications, transcription factor binding, transcript production and genetic variation all provide one-dimensional views of genome regulation. To truly understand the regulatory networks involved in normal development – and how these networks are disrupted in disease progression – we must begin to integrate these data sets. Our results indicate that changes in chromatin accessibility cooperate with genetic variation to influence phenotypes. We are developing methods to integrate genotype, gene expression and chromatin information in prediction of phenotype. Furthermore, we are using these data from model systems to evaluate the potential of obtaining relevant genotype information from chromatin accessibility profiling. We anticipate these methods will be of practical use for personalized medicine in the clinic.
 
 
For more information on Dr. Schones, please click here.

Dustin Schones, Ph.D. Lab Members

Lab Members:
 
Beisi Xu, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
626-256-4673, ext. 63300
beixu@coh.org
 
Juan Du
Grad Student
626-256-4673 ext. 64521
jdu@coh.org
 
Candi Trac, M.S.
Research Associate II
626-256-4673, ext. 64521
ctrac@coh.org

Schones, Dustin E., Ph.D. Laboratory

Laboratory of Dustin E. Schones, Ph.D.

Our lab is generally interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation and how other regulatory elements interact with chromatin. In addition to this, we are interested in how genetic variation interacts with epigenetic variation in the development of diseases such as diabetes and cancer. We utilize an integrative approach, combining experimental and computational methods, to study these problems.
 
One area of the lab is focused on the basic biology of mechanisms responsible for regulating chromatin architecture. We have identified characteristic chromatin patterns at functional regulatory regions of the genome, including promoter and distal enhancer regions. We are furthermore tracking changes in nucleosome positions along various lineage commitment pathways and investigating what mechanisms are responsible for regulating chromatin changes as well as how the changes in chromatin influence other regulatory events.
 
In addition, we are exploring the interaction of epigenetic and genetic variation in mouse models of cancer and diabetes. Genome-wide profiles of chromatin modifications, transcription factor binding, transcript production and genetic variation all provide one-dimensional views of genome regulation. To truly understand the regulatory networks involved in normal development – and how these networks are disrupted in disease progression – we must begin to integrate these data sets. Our results indicate that changes in chromatin accessibility cooperate with genetic variation to influence phenotypes. We are developing methods to integrate genotype, gene expression and chromatin information in prediction of phenotype. Furthermore, we are using these data from model systems to evaluate the potential of obtaining relevant genotype information from chromatin accessibility profiling. We anticipate these methods will be of practical use for personalized medicine in the clinic.
 
 
For more information on Dr. Schones, please click here.

Lab Members

Dustin Schones, Ph.D. Lab Members

Lab Members:
 
Beisi Xu, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
626-256-4673, ext. 63300
beixu@coh.org
 
Juan Du
Grad Student
626-256-4673 ext. 64521
jdu@coh.org
 
Candi Trac, M.S.
Research Associate II
626-256-4673, ext. 64521
ctrac@coh.org
Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 
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By giving to City of Hope, you support breakthrough discoveries in laboratory research that translate into lifesaving treatments for patients with cancer and other serious diseases.
 
 
 
 


NEWS & UPDATES
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  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...