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15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium

Date:
March 1 to 4, 2015
 
Location:

Presented by the Diabetes Research Center at City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA
 
Made possible by the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
 
The upcoming meeting is of special importance because it will be held in association with the Endocrine Society annual meeting and T1D Exchange.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Committee

Scientific Organizing Committee Members
 
Carla Greenbaum, M.D.
Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, WA
 
David Harlan, M.D.
University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, MA
 
Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
City of Hope, Duarte, CA
 
Olle Korsgren, M.D., Ph.D.
Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

Rama Natarajan, Ph.D.
City of Hope, Duarte, CA

Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D.
Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands
 
Ann Marie Schmidt, M.D.
NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

Andrew Stewart, M.D.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

Robert Vigersky, M.D.
Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System, Washington, DC
 
Matthias von Herrath, M.D.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA

Howard Zisser, M.D.
Insulet Corporation, Santa Barbara, CA
 

Registration

  Before 01/15/15 Before 02/17/15 Late/Onsite
Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $525 $550 $575
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $425 $450 $475
       
Nurse/Resident/Student/Trainee      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $325 $350 $375
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $225 $250 $275
       
Single Day      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $225 $250 $275
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $200 $225 $250
       
*Additional registration fee for ENDO2015 applies      
 
How to Register
Attendees can register for the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity online via the City of Hope registration site. 
 
Attendees can also print the registration form , complete and mail with payment to: CME Department, ATTN: CME Registration, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA, 91010 (Checks/money orders must be payable to City of Hope-Levine Symposium.)
 
City of Hope employees may contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org to register directly.
 
Cancellation Policy
Cancellations must be received in writing at levinesymposium@coh.org before February 17, 2015. Cancellations received before February 17 will receive a full refund of the registration minus a $50 administrative fee. Cancellations received on or after February 17 or no-shows will not receive a refund.
 
Special Needs
If you have any special needs you like the Rachmiel Levine Symposium to be made aware of, please contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
Attendees Traveling to the United States
An official letter of registration to facilitate a visa application can be forwarded to any attendee upon request. The letter will be sent only to the person who has paid the registration fees. However, the invitation implies no obligation of the Rachmiel Levine Symposium to cover accommodation, travel expenses, or other costs related to the meeting. Requests should be directed to the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
 

Abstracts and Award

The regular 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium abstract submission system closed on November 13, 2014.
 
It is now possible to submit "Last Minute Abstracts" until February 2, 2015.
 
"LAST MINUTE ABSTRACT" SUBMISSION OPENS: November 21, 2014
"LAST MINUTE ABSTRACT" CLOSING DATE: February 2, 2015
 
Requirements for Submission
  • Abstracts can be submitted for presentation at the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium only.
  • Registration to the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium is required for abstract submission.
  • Submission of the abstract confirms originality and authenticity of the data being presented.
  • Authors will submit abstracts directly to levinesymposium@coh.org.  Include registration confirmation number, presenting author name and presenting author email.
     
Abstract Guidelines
  • Refer to Guidelines for Writing a Scientific Abstract .
  • Abstracts are allowed 2,500 characters. The abstract title, authors, institutions, disclosure information, support sources and references are NOT counted toward this allotment.  Spaces are also not counted toward the 2,500 character limit.
  • Figures and tables may not be submitted. Abstracts are required to be text-only.
  • Authorship on multiple abstracts is permitted.
  • Abstracts cannot contain data already accepted for publication in any online or Pub-Med indexed venue at the time of abstract submission.
  • Abstracts cannot contain data previously presented at a national meeting within the USA at the time of abstract submission.
  • Confirmation of abstract acceptance or rejection will be e-mailed to the presenting author listed on the abstract.
 
Submission Information
  • Authors should submit abstracts directly to levinesymposium@coh.org by February 2, 2015.  Include registration confirmation number, presenting author name and presenting author email.
  • No revisions will be allowed after the deadline date.  
  • Authors will received notice of acceptance/rejection by February 6, 2015.
 
Selection Process
Abstracts are reviewed and accepted/rejected by the Levine Symposium Organizing Committee. 
 
Poster Session
The poster session is designed to allow for direct interaction and significant exchange of ideas between participants. Posters will be on display for the duration of the symposium with the poster session taking place the evening of March 2. Instructions on poster set up at the conference site will be e-mailed to the presenting authors early February.

Scientific Achievement Award
Authors of the top-scoring abstracts will be presented with the Rachmiel Levine Symposium Scientific Achievement Award and be invited to provide an oral presentation during the general session.  Winning authors will be notified prior to the conference start date and MUST BE present to accept their award.  "Last Minute Abstract" submissions will not be eligible for the Scientific Achievement Award.

Publication of Abstracts
Accepted abstracts will be published in an online supplement to Endocrine Reviews and in the conference Program and Abstract Book.  Accepted "Last Minute Abstract" submissions will only be published in the conference Program and Abstract book. 
 
 

Accommodations


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lodging
A block of nonsmoking rooms has been reserved at Paradise Point Resort & Spa.
 
  Single/Double Rate
Lanai Garden Room $199.00*
 
*The Paradise Point Resort & Spa is pleased to offer a 10% discount off Marina rental and The Spa services over the program dates of March 1 to March 4, for all conference guests staying on property.  Additionally, the Passport to Paradise will be waived to guests staying on property, which includes: High speed wireless and hard-wired Internet access in guest rooms, domestic phone calls in guest rooms, unlimited access to the fitness center, basketball, tennis, ping pong, croquet, horseshoes, and bocce ball.
 
Special City of Hope group conference rates per day for rooms, single or double occupancy are available. Conference rates are extended 3 days before and after the conference dates.  The group rate expires on Monday, February 9, 2015, therefore early hotel reservation is suggested.
 
Room reservations can be made by visiting the online rooming page or by calling the Paradise Point Resort & Spa at 800-344-2626.  If calling, state that you are attending the City of Hope Rachmiel Levine Symposium (group code: CITYOFHOPE) to assure you receive the special conference room rate. 
 
Trainee Housing and Form
The Levine Symposium will be offering two (2) waived hotel room night stay at the meeting venue to trainees, as space permits. Submission of the Trainee Housing Form is required.
 
Transportation
View driving directions and transportation services from the San Diego airport and other surrounding areas.
 

Accreditation

City of Hope is accredited by the Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 29.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).TM Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
 
The following may also apply AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM for license renewal:
  • Registered Nurses may report up to 29.75 credit hour(s) toward the continuing education requirement for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of BRN provider number.
  • The National Commission on Certification of Physicians Assistants states that AMA Category 1 accredited courses are acceptable for CME requirements for certification.
 
Disclosure
This activity has been planned and implemented in strict compliance with the Essential Elements and Policies of the ACCME. City of Hope takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
 
Acknowledgement of Commercial Support
This educational conference is made possible, in part, through unrestricted educational grants of support. All grant supporters will be acknowledged at the conference via signage and will be listed in the program and abstract book.
 

Program

SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 2015

Session 1: Diabetes complications: New biomarkers and drug targets (12:00 pm to 2:00 pm)
  • New treatments for diabetic complications: Results from high throughtput screening and in silico modeling (A. Schmidt, NYU Langone Medical Center)
  • New therapies and biomarkers for diabetic complications: Lessons learnt from omics profiling (K. Sharma, University of California San Diego)
  • RAGE and retinal disease: Roles in diabetic retinopathy (A. Stitt, Queen's University Belfast)
  • Transcription factor acetylation in diabetic glomerulopathy (J. He, Mount Sinai Hospital)
 
Session 2: Personalized medicine in future diabetes care (2:20 pm to 4:20 pm)
  • Personalized medicine in future treatment of diabetes complications (E. Bottinger, Icahn School of Medicine Mount Sinai)
  • Systems biology approaches to individualized medicine of diabetes (A. Butte, Stanford University)
  • Pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine in type 2 diabetes: Potential implications for clinical practice (J. Florez, Massachusetts General Hospital)
  • Systems genetics of diabetic nephropathy (M. Kretzler, University of Michigan)

Oral Presentations (4:20 pm)
 
Presentation of Awards and Dinner Lecture (6:00 pm)
Type 1 diabetes: Adults vs. kids (C. Greenbaum, Benaroya Research Institute)

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2015
 
Session 1: Epigenetics of diabetes (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • Epigenomics of insulin resistance (E. Rosen, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
  • Epigenetic mechanisms in diabetic complications and metabolic memory (R. Natarajan, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope)
  • Epigenetics and diabetic embryopathy (M. Loeken, Joslin Diabetes Center)
  • Epigenetics and beta cell identity (M. Sander, University of California San Diego)
 
Session 2: Obesity and inflammation (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Obesity and immune system (M. Bluher, University Hospital Leipzig)
  • Macrophage lysosome dysfunction in diabetic inflammation (J. Schilling, Washington University)
  • Macrophages, insulin resistance and immunometabolism (A. Ferrante, Columbia University)
  • Macrophages and vitamin D metabolism in diabetes (C. Bernal-Mizrachi, Washington University)
 
Session 3: Metabolism and inflammation (1:30 pm to 3:30 pm)
  • Metabolic signatures in the development of insulin resistance (C. Newgard, Duke University)
  • Circadian clock and metabolic disease (P. Sassone-Corsi, University of California Irvine)
  • Anticipatory inflammation: Physiological functions and pathological consequences (A. Chawla, University of California San Francisco)
  • Targeting neuroinflammation for diabetes treatment (M. Tschop, Helmholtz Diabetes Center)
 
Debate: Can adult human beta cells proliferate? (3:50 pm to 5:00 pm)
  • (A. Stewart, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
  • (D. Harlan, University of Massachusetts)
 
Plenary Lecture (5:00 pm to 5:35 pm)
Overview talk - 30 year history of the DCCT (D. Nathan, Massachusetts General Hospital)
 
Poster Session (5:35 pm)

TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2015
 
Session 1: Lessons from human insulinoma for beta cell regeneration (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • The role of YY-1 in human insulinoma pathogenesis (G. Ning, Shanghai Institute for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases)
  • Novel insulinoma-genic molecular pathways (T. Carling, Yale University)
  • RNA profiling of human insulinomas for beta cell regeneration strategies (A. Stewart, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
  • Long non-coding RNAs in insulinoma (J. Ferrer, Imperial College London)
 
Session 2: Novel molecules that induce human beta cell replication (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Liver-derived beta cell regenerative factors (R. Kulkarni, Joslin Diabetes Center)
  • Novel therapeutic epigenetic modulators of human beta cell replication (A. Bhushan, University of California San Francisco)
  • High-throughput screening for small-molecule inducers of beta-cell proliferation (B. Wagner, Broad Institute)
  • Novel small molecule agonists of human beta cell proliferation (P. Wang, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

Session 3: Reprogramming islet cells to beta cells (1:30 pm to 3:05 pm)
  • Alpha cells to beta cells - 1 (P. Collombat, University Nice Sophia Antipolis)
  • Alpha cells to beta cells - 2 (K. Kaestner, University of Pennsylvania)
  • De-programming and re-programming of beta cells (D. Accili, Columbia University)
 
Session 4: The stressful life of the diabetic cell (3:25 pm to 5:25 pm)
  • Metabolic dysfunction and beta cell stress (R. Kaufman, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute)
  • Protein misfolding and beta cell stress (P. Arvan, University of Michigan)
  • Beta cell inflammation and ER stress (A. Cardozo, Universite Libre de Bruxelles)
  • Calcium signaling and ER stress in obesity and type 2 diabetes (I. Tabas, Columbia University)
 
Debate: Virus? What virus? (5:45 pm to 6:55 pm)
  • (B. Roep, Leiden University Medical Center)
  • (M. von Herrath, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology)

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2015
 
Session 1: Type 1 diabetes biomarkers (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • JDRF biomarker working group (J. Odegard, Benaroya Research Institute)
  • Type 1 diabetes biomarkers (T. Brusko, University of Florida)
  • Biomarkers from recent onset clinical trials (P. Gottlieb, University of Colorado)
  • Post-translational modification as biomarkers (E. James, Benaroya Research Institute)
 
Session 2: Diabetes technology updates (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Novel insulin formulations (M. Weiss, Case Western Reserve University)
  • Foreign body and inflammatory response to implanted sensors (N. Wisniewski, PROFUSA, Inc.)
  • Intravascular sensor (J. Joseph, Thomas Jefferson University)
  • Long-term implanted glucose sensors (D. Gough, University of California San Diego)
     
Session 3: Novel approaches to understanding and treating hypoglycemia (12:40 pm to 2:40 pm)
  • Cerebral adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia (R. McCrimmon, University of Dundee)
  • Protection against hypoglycemia-induced morbidity and mortality (S. Fisher, University of Utah)
  • Hypoglycemia-induced cardiac arrhythmias (S. Heller, University of Sheffield)
  • Psychological factors and behavioral approaches in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness (L. Gonder-Frederick, University of Virginia Health System)
 
Plenary Lecture (2:40 pm to 3:15 pm)
Outcomes from the CIT trial (A. Naji, University of Pennsylvania)
 

Dr. Rachmiel Levine

Dr. Rachmiel Levine, known as the "Wise Owl" at City of Hope, was born on August 26, 1910 in Eastern Poland. At the age of six he suffered the loss of his mother and ten years later, his father died in an anti-Jewish riot in the Ukraine. At the age of sixteen, Rachmiel discovered that he had relatives who lived in America and attempted to relocate to the United States. Unable to obtain the visa to come to the United States, Rachmiel immigrated to Canada and was adopted by a Canadian physician. His first career choice was mathematics, but the depression of the 1930s influenced his decision to instead enter the field of medicine.
 
Rachmiel Levine received his undergraduate degree in 1932 and continued his education at McGill University, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1936. After medical school, he relocated to work in the field of diabetes research with Dr. Samuel Soskin at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Levine completed his internship and residency training at the Michael Reese Hospital between the years 1936-1938. From the years 1942-1960 he served as Director of the Department of Metabolism, Chairman of the Department of Medicine, and Director of Medical Education at Michael Reese Hospital. Dr. Levine later relocated to New York Medical College where he served as Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1960-1971.
 
In 1971, Dr. Rachmiel Levine became the Executive Medical Director at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California. He served as Director for eight years, and in 1984, the City of Hope honored him with the title, Deputy Director for Research Emeritus.
 
Dr. Levine's research strengths were initially illustrated in his first published paper with Dr. Samuel Soskin entitled, "The Effects of Blood-Sugar Level on Glucose Utilization". With this research study, he introduced the theory that the greater the amount of glucose present in the blood, the greater the amount that is used by the body. In 1946, he published the book entitled, "Carbohydrate Metabolism". The publication of this book helped lay the base for future diabetes studies through its concise basic science summary. In 1949, he gained the title "Father of Modern Diabetes Research" by becoming the first scientist to discover the role of insulin in glucose metabolism. While studying at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Dr. Levine and his colleagues, Dr. Samuel Soskin and Dr. Maurice Goldstein, determined "insulin's mechanical role in glucose metabolism". Contrary to the assumption that glucose molecules freely passed through the cell membrane, Dr. Levine's theory, known as the "Levine Effect" or transport theory, suggested that insulin served as the key regulatory factor for the transport of glucose into the cells. Dr. Levine theorized that insulin stimulates the transport of glucose from blood to fat/muscle cells and thus lowers blood glucose level.
 
Dr. Rachmiel Levine's greatest challenge was to prove his theory to the scientific community. To dispel the ideology that insulin only served in the chemical metabolism of glucose once inside the cell, Dr. Levine performed the following experiment. He injected dogs with galactose and then with galactose plus insulin, and measured the amount of galactose in the blood. Galactose is similar to glucose, in that it can be equally transported across the cell membrane, however once inside the cell, galactose cannot be metabolized like glucose. If successful, the test would show that galactose could only be transported across the cell membrane in the presence of insulin. Dr. Levine's tests proved that galactose collected in the cells and, as a consequence, galactose levels in the blood dropped.
Although Dr. Levine and his colleagues were able to publish their theory, it took them years to thoroughly convince the scientific community. Once accepted, Dr. Levine's theory opened up doors to a new era of hormone research.
 
Dr. Levine's research success continued at the City of Hope National Medical Center as he developed the City of Hope Diabetes Program. In 1978, Dr. Levine encouraged Dr. Arthur D. Riggs and Dr. Keiichi Itakura to genetically engineer E-coli bacteria to produce human insulin (Humulin®). This new preparation of human insulin was the first genetically engineered health care product approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and is now used by over 4 million people worldwide. Dr. Rachmiel Levine retired from City of Hope on November 15, 1991 but continued to contribute to the scientific community until the last weeks of his life. He left behind a legacy of over sixty years of diabetes research and served as mentor and advisor to many. Dr. Levine set an example for all scientists with his concept of a good scientist: "In my opinion a good research scientist needs to have endless curiosity and enormous amounts of patience, since answers in the field of research come slowly and most painfully."

Dr. Levine was married to the late Anne Gussack, a psychiatric social worker and is survived by his daughter, Judith Anne Feldman, MD, a Boston psychiatrist and his son, Daniel Saul Levine, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Rachmiel Levine died in Boston, Massachusetts on February 24, 1998, but will be remembered for his great contributions to the scientific world. Below is a small sample of the awards and honors that Dr. Levine received over the course of his lifetime.

Executive Medical Director, Emeritus: City of Hope
American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal
American Diabetes Association's Charles H. Best Medal
Joslin Medal
Thompson Medal
President of Harvey Society
Member of American Association of Physicians
Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Spirit of Life Award: City of Hope
Lydia and Paul Kalmanovitz Chair in the Biology of Nutrition at City of Hope
Honorary Doctorate of Science degrees: Northwestern and McGill Universities
1964-1965: President of the American Diabetes Association
1967-1970: President and currently Life President of International Diabetes Federation
1980: New York College of Medicine dedicates diabetes center in honor of Dr. Levine
1982: Elected into National Academy of Sciences
1986: W.D. Sansum Award
1995: City of Hope dedicated the Rachmiel Levine, MD, Diabetes Reading Room in its Lee Graff Medical Library

References
R Levine, MS Goldstein, B Huddlestun, SP Klein. Action of insulin on the permeability of cells to free hexoses, as studied by its effect on the distribution of galactose. Am J Physiol 163:70-76, 1950.
R Levine, M Goldstein. On the mechanism of action of insulin. Recent Prog Horm Res 11:343-380, 1955.
R Levine. Insulin action: 1948-80. Diabetes Care 4:38-44, 1981.
 

Rachmiel Levine Symposium

15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium

Date:
March 1 to 4, 2015
 
Location:

Presented by the Diabetes Research Center at City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA
 
Made possible by the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
 
The upcoming meeting is of special importance because it will be held in association with the Endocrine Society annual meeting and T1D Exchange.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Committee

Committee

Scientific Organizing Committee Members
 
Carla Greenbaum, M.D.
Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, WA
 
David Harlan, M.D.
University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, MA
 
Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
City of Hope, Duarte, CA
 
Olle Korsgren, M.D., Ph.D.
Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

Rama Natarajan, Ph.D.
City of Hope, Duarte, CA

Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D.
Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands
 
Ann Marie Schmidt, M.D.
NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

Andrew Stewart, M.D.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

Robert Vigersky, M.D.
Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System, Washington, DC
 
Matthias von Herrath, M.D.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA

Howard Zisser, M.D.
Insulet Corporation, Santa Barbara, CA
 

Registration

Registration

  Before 01/15/15 Before 02/17/15 Late/Onsite
Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $525 $550 $575
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $425 $450 $475
       
Nurse/Resident/Student/Trainee      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $325 $350 $375
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $225 $250 $275
       
Single Day      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $225 $250 $275
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2015* $200 $225 $250
       
*Additional registration fee for ENDO2015 applies      
 
How to Register
Attendees can register for the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity online via the City of Hope registration site. 
 
Attendees can also print the registration form , complete and mail with payment to: CME Department, ATTN: CME Registration, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA, 91010 (Checks/money orders must be payable to City of Hope-Levine Symposium.)
 
City of Hope employees may contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org to register directly.
 
Cancellation Policy
Cancellations must be received in writing at levinesymposium@coh.org before February 17, 2015. Cancellations received before February 17 will receive a full refund of the registration minus a $50 administrative fee. Cancellations received on or after February 17 or no-shows will not receive a refund.
 
Special Needs
If you have any special needs you like the Rachmiel Levine Symposium to be made aware of, please contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
Attendees Traveling to the United States
An official letter of registration to facilitate a visa application can be forwarded to any attendee upon request. The letter will be sent only to the person who has paid the registration fees. However, the invitation implies no obligation of the Rachmiel Levine Symposium to cover accommodation, travel expenses, or other costs related to the meeting. Requests should be directed to the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
 

Abstracts and Award

Abstracts and Award

The regular 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium abstract submission system closed on November 13, 2014.
 
It is now possible to submit "Last Minute Abstracts" until February 2, 2015.
 
"LAST MINUTE ABSTRACT" SUBMISSION OPENS: November 21, 2014
"LAST MINUTE ABSTRACT" CLOSING DATE: February 2, 2015
 
Requirements for Submission
  • Abstracts can be submitted for presentation at the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium only.
  • Registration to the 15th Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium is required for abstract submission.
  • Submission of the abstract confirms originality and authenticity of the data being presented.
  • Authors will submit abstracts directly to levinesymposium@coh.org.  Include registration confirmation number, presenting author name and presenting author email.
     
Abstract Guidelines
  • Refer to Guidelines for Writing a Scientific Abstract .
  • Abstracts are allowed 2,500 characters. The abstract title, authors, institutions, disclosure information, support sources and references are NOT counted toward this allotment.  Spaces are also not counted toward the 2,500 character limit.
  • Figures and tables may not be submitted. Abstracts are required to be text-only.
  • Authorship on multiple abstracts is permitted.
  • Abstracts cannot contain data already accepted for publication in any online or Pub-Med indexed venue at the time of abstract submission.
  • Abstracts cannot contain data previously presented at a national meeting within the USA at the time of abstract submission.
  • Confirmation of abstract acceptance or rejection will be e-mailed to the presenting author listed on the abstract.
 
Submission Information
  • Authors should submit abstracts directly to levinesymposium@coh.org by February 2, 2015.  Include registration confirmation number, presenting author name and presenting author email.
  • No revisions will be allowed after the deadline date.  
  • Authors will received notice of acceptance/rejection by February 6, 2015.
 
Selection Process
Abstracts are reviewed and accepted/rejected by the Levine Symposium Organizing Committee. 
 
Poster Session
The poster session is designed to allow for direct interaction and significant exchange of ideas between participants. Posters will be on display for the duration of the symposium with the poster session taking place the evening of March 2. Instructions on poster set up at the conference site will be e-mailed to the presenting authors early February.

Scientific Achievement Award
Authors of the top-scoring abstracts will be presented with the Rachmiel Levine Symposium Scientific Achievement Award and be invited to provide an oral presentation during the general session.  Winning authors will be notified prior to the conference start date and MUST BE present to accept their award.  "Last Minute Abstract" submissions will not be eligible for the Scientific Achievement Award.

Publication of Abstracts
Accepted abstracts will be published in an online supplement to Endocrine Reviews and in the conference Program and Abstract Book.  Accepted "Last Minute Abstract" submissions will only be published in the conference Program and Abstract book. 
 
 

Accommodations

Accommodations


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lodging
A block of nonsmoking rooms has been reserved at Paradise Point Resort & Spa.
 
  Single/Double Rate
Lanai Garden Room $199.00*
 
*The Paradise Point Resort & Spa is pleased to offer a 10% discount off Marina rental and The Spa services over the program dates of March 1 to March 4, for all conference guests staying on property.  Additionally, the Passport to Paradise will be waived to guests staying on property, which includes: High speed wireless and hard-wired Internet access in guest rooms, domestic phone calls in guest rooms, unlimited access to the fitness center, basketball, tennis, ping pong, croquet, horseshoes, and bocce ball.
 
Special City of Hope group conference rates per day for rooms, single or double occupancy are available. Conference rates are extended 3 days before and after the conference dates.  The group rate expires on Monday, February 9, 2015, therefore early hotel reservation is suggested.
 
Room reservations can be made by visiting the online rooming page or by calling the Paradise Point Resort & Spa at 800-344-2626.  If calling, state that you are attending the City of Hope Rachmiel Levine Symposium (group code: CITYOFHOPE) to assure you receive the special conference room rate. 
 
Trainee Housing and Form
The Levine Symposium will be offering two (2) waived hotel room night stay at the meeting venue to trainees, as space permits. Submission of the Trainee Housing Form is required.
 
Transportation
View driving directions and transportation services from the San Diego airport and other surrounding areas.
 

Accreditation

Accreditation

City of Hope is accredited by the Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 29.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).TM Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
 
The following may also apply AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM for license renewal:
  • Registered Nurses may report up to 29.75 credit hour(s) toward the continuing education requirement for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of BRN provider number.
  • The National Commission on Certification of Physicians Assistants states that AMA Category 1 accredited courses are acceptable for CME requirements for certification.
 
Disclosure
This activity has been planned and implemented in strict compliance with the Essential Elements and Policies of the ACCME. City of Hope takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
 
Acknowledgement of Commercial Support
This educational conference is made possible, in part, through unrestricted educational grants of support. All grant supporters will be acknowledged at the conference via signage and will be listed in the program and abstract book.
 

Program

Program

SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 2015

Session 1: Diabetes complications: New biomarkers and drug targets (12:00 pm to 2:00 pm)
  • New treatments for diabetic complications: Results from high throughtput screening and in silico modeling (A. Schmidt, NYU Langone Medical Center)
  • New therapies and biomarkers for diabetic complications: Lessons learnt from omics profiling (K. Sharma, University of California San Diego)
  • RAGE and retinal disease: Roles in diabetic retinopathy (A. Stitt, Queen's University Belfast)
  • Transcription factor acetylation in diabetic glomerulopathy (J. He, Mount Sinai Hospital)
 
Session 2: Personalized medicine in future diabetes care (2:20 pm to 4:20 pm)
  • Personalized medicine in future treatment of diabetes complications (E. Bottinger, Icahn School of Medicine Mount Sinai)
  • Systems biology approaches to individualized medicine of diabetes (A. Butte, Stanford University)
  • Pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine in type 2 diabetes: Potential implications for clinical practice (J. Florez, Massachusetts General Hospital)
  • Systems genetics of diabetic nephropathy (M. Kretzler, University of Michigan)

Oral Presentations (4:20 pm)
 
Presentation of Awards and Dinner Lecture (6:00 pm)
Type 1 diabetes: Adults vs. kids (C. Greenbaum, Benaroya Research Institute)

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2015
 
Session 1: Epigenetics of diabetes (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • Epigenomics of insulin resistance (E. Rosen, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
  • Epigenetic mechanisms in diabetic complications and metabolic memory (R. Natarajan, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope)
  • Epigenetics and diabetic embryopathy (M. Loeken, Joslin Diabetes Center)
  • Epigenetics and beta cell identity (M. Sander, University of California San Diego)
 
Session 2: Obesity and inflammation (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Obesity and immune system (M. Bluher, University Hospital Leipzig)
  • Macrophage lysosome dysfunction in diabetic inflammation (J. Schilling, Washington University)
  • Macrophages, insulin resistance and immunometabolism (A. Ferrante, Columbia University)
  • Macrophages and vitamin D metabolism in diabetes (C. Bernal-Mizrachi, Washington University)
 
Session 3: Metabolism and inflammation (1:30 pm to 3:30 pm)
  • Metabolic signatures in the development of insulin resistance (C. Newgard, Duke University)
  • Circadian clock and metabolic disease (P. Sassone-Corsi, University of California Irvine)
  • Anticipatory inflammation: Physiological functions and pathological consequences (A. Chawla, University of California San Francisco)
  • Targeting neuroinflammation for diabetes treatment (M. Tschop, Helmholtz Diabetes Center)
 
Debate: Can adult human beta cells proliferate? (3:50 pm to 5:00 pm)
  • (A. Stewart, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
  • (D. Harlan, University of Massachusetts)
 
Plenary Lecture (5:00 pm to 5:35 pm)
Overview talk - 30 year history of the DCCT (D. Nathan, Massachusetts General Hospital)
 
Poster Session (5:35 pm)

TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2015
 
Session 1: Lessons from human insulinoma for beta cell regeneration (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • The role of YY-1 in human insulinoma pathogenesis (G. Ning, Shanghai Institute for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases)
  • Novel insulinoma-genic molecular pathways (T. Carling, Yale University)
  • RNA profiling of human insulinomas for beta cell regeneration strategies (A. Stewart, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
  • Long non-coding RNAs in insulinoma (J. Ferrer, Imperial College London)
 
Session 2: Novel molecules that induce human beta cell replication (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Liver-derived beta cell regenerative factors (R. Kulkarni, Joslin Diabetes Center)
  • Novel therapeutic epigenetic modulators of human beta cell replication (A. Bhushan, University of California San Francisco)
  • High-throughput screening for small-molecule inducers of beta-cell proliferation (B. Wagner, Broad Institute)
  • Novel small molecule agonists of human beta cell proliferation (P. Wang, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

Session 3: Reprogramming islet cells to beta cells (1:30 pm to 3:05 pm)
  • Alpha cells to beta cells - 1 (P. Collombat, University Nice Sophia Antipolis)
  • Alpha cells to beta cells - 2 (K. Kaestner, University of Pennsylvania)
  • De-programming and re-programming of beta cells (D. Accili, Columbia University)
 
Session 4: The stressful life of the diabetic cell (3:25 pm to 5:25 pm)
  • Metabolic dysfunction and beta cell stress (R. Kaufman, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute)
  • Protein misfolding and beta cell stress (P. Arvan, University of Michigan)
  • Beta cell inflammation and ER stress (A. Cardozo, Universite Libre de Bruxelles)
  • Calcium signaling and ER stress in obesity and type 2 diabetes (I. Tabas, Columbia University)
 
Debate: Virus? What virus? (5:45 pm to 6:55 pm)
  • (B. Roep, Leiden University Medical Center)
  • (M. von Herrath, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology)

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2015
 
Session 1: Type 1 diabetes biomarkers (8:00 am to 10:00 am)
  • JDRF biomarker working group (J. Odegard, Benaroya Research Institute)
  • Type 1 diabetes biomarkers (T. Brusko, University of Florida)
  • Biomarkers from recent onset clinical trials (P. Gottlieb, University of Colorado)
  • Post-translational modification as biomarkers (E. James, Benaroya Research Institute)
 
Session 2: Diabetes technology updates (10:20 am to 12:20 pm)
  • Novel insulin formulations (M. Weiss, Case Western Reserve University)
  • Foreign body and inflammatory response to implanted sensors (N. Wisniewski, PROFUSA, Inc.)
  • Intravascular sensor (J. Joseph, Thomas Jefferson University)
  • Long-term implanted glucose sensors (D. Gough, University of California San Diego)
     
Session 3: Novel approaches to understanding and treating hypoglycemia (12:40 pm to 2:40 pm)
  • Cerebral adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia (R. McCrimmon, University of Dundee)
  • Protection against hypoglycemia-induced morbidity and mortality (S. Fisher, University of Utah)
  • Hypoglycemia-induced cardiac arrhythmias (S. Heller, University of Sheffield)
  • Psychological factors and behavioral approaches in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness (L. Gonder-Frederick, University of Virginia Health System)
 
Plenary Lecture (2:40 pm to 3:15 pm)
Outcomes from the CIT trial (A. Naji, University of Pennsylvania)
 

Rachmiel Levine, M.D.

Dr. Rachmiel Levine

Dr. Rachmiel Levine, known as the "Wise Owl" at City of Hope, was born on August 26, 1910 in Eastern Poland. At the age of six he suffered the loss of his mother and ten years later, his father died in an anti-Jewish riot in the Ukraine. At the age of sixteen, Rachmiel discovered that he had relatives who lived in America and attempted to relocate to the United States. Unable to obtain the visa to come to the United States, Rachmiel immigrated to Canada and was adopted by a Canadian physician. His first career choice was mathematics, but the depression of the 1930s influenced his decision to instead enter the field of medicine.
 
Rachmiel Levine received his undergraduate degree in 1932 and continued his education at McGill University, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1936. After medical school, he relocated to work in the field of diabetes research with Dr. Samuel Soskin at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Levine completed his internship and residency training at the Michael Reese Hospital between the years 1936-1938. From the years 1942-1960 he served as Director of the Department of Metabolism, Chairman of the Department of Medicine, and Director of Medical Education at Michael Reese Hospital. Dr. Levine later relocated to New York Medical College where he served as Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1960-1971.
 
In 1971, Dr. Rachmiel Levine became the Executive Medical Director at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California. He served as Director for eight years, and in 1984, the City of Hope honored him with the title, Deputy Director for Research Emeritus.
 
Dr. Levine's research strengths were initially illustrated in his first published paper with Dr. Samuel Soskin entitled, "The Effects of Blood-Sugar Level on Glucose Utilization". With this research study, he introduced the theory that the greater the amount of glucose present in the blood, the greater the amount that is used by the body. In 1946, he published the book entitled, "Carbohydrate Metabolism". The publication of this book helped lay the base for future diabetes studies through its concise basic science summary. In 1949, he gained the title "Father of Modern Diabetes Research" by becoming the first scientist to discover the role of insulin in glucose metabolism. While studying at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Dr. Levine and his colleagues, Dr. Samuel Soskin and Dr. Maurice Goldstein, determined "insulin's mechanical role in glucose metabolism". Contrary to the assumption that glucose molecules freely passed through the cell membrane, Dr. Levine's theory, known as the "Levine Effect" or transport theory, suggested that insulin served as the key regulatory factor for the transport of glucose into the cells. Dr. Levine theorized that insulin stimulates the transport of glucose from blood to fat/muscle cells and thus lowers blood glucose level.
 
Dr. Rachmiel Levine's greatest challenge was to prove his theory to the scientific community. To dispel the ideology that insulin only served in the chemical metabolism of glucose once inside the cell, Dr. Levine performed the following experiment. He injected dogs with galactose and then with galactose plus insulin, and measured the amount of galactose in the blood. Galactose is similar to glucose, in that it can be equally transported across the cell membrane, however once inside the cell, galactose cannot be metabolized like glucose. If successful, the test would show that galactose could only be transported across the cell membrane in the presence of insulin. Dr. Levine's tests proved that galactose collected in the cells and, as a consequence, galactose levels in the blood dropped.
Although Dr. Levine and his colleagues were able to publish their theory, it took them years to thoroughly convince the scientific community. Once accepted, Dr. Levine's theory opened up doors to a new era of hormone research.
 
Dr. Levine's research success continued at the City of Hope National Medical Center as he developed the City of Hope Diabetes Program. In 1978, Dr. Levine encouraged Dr. Arthur D. Riggs and Dr. Keiichi Itakura to genetically engineer E-coli bacteria to produce human insulin (Humulin®). This new preparation of human insulin was the first genetically engineered health care product approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and is now used by over 4 million people worldwide. Dr. Rachmiel Levine retired from City of Hope on November 15, 1991 but continued to contribute to the scientific community until the last weeks of his life. He left behind a legacy of over sixty years of diabetes research and served as mentor and advisor to many. Dr. Levine set an example for all scientists with his concept of a good scientist: "In my opinion a good research scientist needs to have endless curiosity and enormous amounts of patience, since answers in the field of research come slowly and most painfully."

Dr. Levine was married to the late Anne Gussack, a psychiatric social worker and is survived by his daughter, Judith Anne Feldman, MD, a Boston psychiatrist and his son, Daniel Saul Levine, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Rachmiel Levine died in Boston, Massachusetts on February 24, 1998, but will be remembered for his great contributions to the scientific world. Below is a small sample of the awards and honors that Dr. Levine received over the course of his lifetime.

Executive Medical Director, Emeritus: City of Hope
American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal
American Diabetes Association's Charles H. Best Medal
Joslin Medal
Thompson Medal
President of Harvey Society
Member of American Association of Physicians
Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Spirit of Life Award: City of Hope
Lydia and Paul Kalmanovitz Chair in the Biology of Nutrition at City of Hope
Honorary Doctorate of Science degrees: Northwestern and McGill Universities
1964-1965: President of the American Diabetes Association
1967-1970: President and currently Life President of International Diabetes Federation
1980: New York College of Medicine dedicates diabetes center in honor of Dr. Levine
1982: Elected into National Academy of Sciences
1986: W.D. Sansum Award
1995: City of Hope dedicated the Rachmiel Levine, MD, Diabetes Reading Room in its Lee Graff Medical Library

References
R Levine, MS Goldstein, B Huddlestun, SP Klein. Action of insulin on the permeability of cells to free hexoses, as studied by its effect on the distribution of galactose. Am J Physiol 163:70-76, 1950.
R Levine, M Goldstein. On the mechanism of action of insulin. Recent Prog Horm Res 11:343-380, 1955.
R Levine. Insulin action: 1948-80. Diabetes Care 4:38-44, 1981.
 
Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research
City of Hope’s Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research, housed in the Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Diabetes & Genetic Research Center.  The Department encompasses the laboratory efforts of two Divisions, the Division of Developmental & Translational Diabetes and Endocrine Research Directed by Dr. Fouad Kandeel, and the Division of Molecular Diabetes Research, Directed by Dr. Rama Natarajan.
Contact Us
For conference inquiries:
Karen Ramos
Program Coordinator
Phone: 800-679-4673
 
For exhibit inquiries:
Leonard Chen
Corporate Representative
Phone: 800-679-4673
Email: levinesymposium@coh.org
 
Ranked as one of  "America’s Best Hospitals" in cancer by U.S. News & World Report, City of Hope is a pioneer in the fields of hematopoietic cell transplantation and genetics. Designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest honor bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope's research and treatment protocols advance care throughout the nation.
 
ICT Mission
The mission of the City of Hope ICT program is to address the problems currently facing islet transplantation and catalyze advancements in the field by sharing the vast and unique resources and expertise available in Southern California.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.


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