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NRE Programs for Health Professionals Bookmark and Share

Nursing Research and Education Programs for Health Professionals

Health care professionals who have made the decision to specialize in oncology or palliative care face a unique set of challenges. Issues such as quality of life, communication concerns and symptom management regularly impact standard of care. City of Hope’s Division of Nursing Research and Education offers several specialized education programs. Please visit our webpage and browse a sample of our courses below. Feel free to contact us after browsing our pages and courses. Email: NRE@coh.org.
 
For information please contact, Liz Gourdine: mgourdine@coh.org
Phone: 626-256-4673 ext. 63488
 
Using the evidence-based COMFORTTM SM Communication Curriculum, this interactive 2-day course will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, USB of video examples with teaching guide, and additional resources. Using a goal-directed method of teaching, faculty will help teams develop three goals for implementing process improvement related to communication. Competitively selected oncology nurse teams from (2 participants per team) will be selected and the curriculum is appropriate for any level of learner (CEUs will be offered). Visit the course webpage or contact: nre@coh.org
  • June 11-12, 2015: Anaheim, CA
  • October 15-16, 2015: Washington, DC
 
The aim of this two-day grant-funded course is to improve the quality of care for patients and families by offering a palliative care communication course. The curriculum is appropriate for all core disciplines (physician, nurse, social worker, chaplain). Applications are now closed for the January 2015 course. Please visit the course webpage and email Lisa Kilburn: pallcarecomm@coh.org for future training information and to be added to our mailing list.
 
ELNEC is a national education initiative to improve end-of-life care in the United States. The Project provides undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty, CE providers, staff development educators, specialty nurses in pediatrics, oncology, critical care and geriatrics and other nurses with training in end-of-life care so they can teach this essential information to nursing students and practicing nurses. ELNEC trainings are held multiple times each year in locations across the country.
Contact: Linda Garcia: lindagarcia@coh.org
 
The City of Hope Pain & Palliative Care Resource Center (COHPPRC) serves as a clearinghouse of information and resources that assist others in improving the quality of pain management and end of life care. Established in 1985 by the Division of Nursing Research and Education, it is a central source of a variety of materials including pain assessment tools, patient education materials, research instruments, quality assurance materials, special population resources, cancer survivorship resources, spirituality, communication, end of life resources, and other resources. Visit the webpage now.
 
The PCC Institute website provides information on communication training based on the COMFORTTM SM Curriculum and offers provider, patient and family resources developed through rigorous research. PCC Institute provides a community to facilitate collaboration, create content for communication interventions, innovate communication approaches and tools, and research outcomes associated with communication in palliative care settings. Visit www.pccinstitute.com now and find us on Facebook and Twitter!
 
Adequate pain management is a 24-hour responsibility for all health care professionals. This is especially true for nurses who spend more time with patients in pain than any other member of the health care team. This two-day course is intended to prepare nurses to assume greater commitment and accountability for pain management through a comprehensive training program related to assessment and treatment of pain.  Visit the PRN Course website or contact Yvonne Rodriguez: Yvrodriguez@coh.org or 626-256-4673 ext. 62987
 
 
 
 
 

NRE Programs for Health Professionals

Nursing Research and Education Programs for Health Professionals

Health care professionals who have made the decision to specialize in oncology or palliative care face a unique set of challenges. Issues such as quality of life, communication concerns and symptom management regularly impact standard of care. City of Hope’s Division of Nursing Research and Education offers several specialized education programs. Please visit our webpage and browse a sample of our courses below. Feel free to contact us after browsing our pages and courses. Email: NRE@coh.org.
 
For information please contact, Liz Gourdine: mgourdine@coh.org
Phone: 626-256-4673 ext. 63488
 
Using the evidence-based COMFORTTM SM Communication Curriculum, this interactive 2-day course will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, USB of video examples with teaching guide, and additional resources. Using a goal-directed method of teaching, faculty will help teams develop three goals for implementing process improvement related to communication. Competitively selected oncology nurse teams from (2 participants per team) will be selected and the curriculum is appropriate for any level of learner (CEUs will be offered). Visit the course webpage or contact: nre@coh.org
  • June 11-12, 2015: Anaheim, CA
  • October 15-16, 2015: Washington, DC
 
The aim of this two-day grant-funded course is to improve the quality of care for patients and families by offering a palliative care communication course. The curriculum is appropriate for all core disciplines (physician, nurse, social worker, chaplain). Applications are now closed for the January 2015 course. Please visit the course webpage and email Lisa Kilburn: pallcarecomm@coh.org for future training information and to be added to our mailing list.
 
ELNEC is a national education initiative to improve end-of-life care in the United States. The Project provides undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty, CE providers, staff development educators, specialty nurses in pediatrics, oncology, critical care and geriatrics and other nurses with training in end-of-life care so they can teach this essential information to nursing students and practicing nurses. ELNEC trainings are held multiple times each year in locations across the country.
Contact: Linda Garcia: lindagarcia@coh.org
 
The City of Hope Pain & Palliative Care Resource Center (COHPPRC) serves as a clearinghouse of information and resources that assist others in improving the quality of pain management and end of life care. Established in 1985 by the Division of Nursing Research and Education, it is a central source of a variety of materials including pain assessment tools, patient education materials, research instruments, quality assurance materials, special population resources, cancer survivorship resources, spirituality, communication, end of life resources, and other resources. Visit the webpage now.
 
The PCC Institute website provides information on communication training based on the COMFORTTM SM Curriculum and offers provider, patient and family resources developed through rigorous research. PCC Institute provides a community to facilitate collaboration, create content for communication interventions, innovate communication approaches and tools, and research outcomes associated with communication in palliative care settings. Visit www.pccinstitute.com now and find us on Facebook and Twitter!
 
Adequate pain management is a 24-hour responsibility for all health care professionals. This is especially true for nurses who spend more time with patients in pain than any other member of the health care team. This two-day course is intended to prepare nurses to assume greater commitment and accountability for pain management through a comprehensive training program related to assessment and treatment of pain.  Visit the PRN Course website or contact Yvonne Rodriguez: Yvrodriguez@coh.org or 626-256-4673 ext. 62987
 
 
 
 
 
Current NRE Programs for Health Professionals

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
For the 11th year, U.S.News & World Report has named City of Hope one of the top cancer hospitals in the country.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 


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