A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumors and other Pediatric Cancers Bookmark and Share

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumor and Other Pediatric Cancers

The Pediatric Oncology Program at City of Hope offers comprehensive, family-centered, leading-edge treatment for childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with neuroblastoma, Wilms Tumor and a wide variety of other benign and malignant solid tumors that require expert care to offer the best chance of cure.

Neuroblastoma
Neuroblastoma, a cancer that develops in immature nerve cells, represents a diagnostic and treatment dilemma that requires expert understanding of the tumor’s biology. At City of Hope, our ground-breaking work in both laboratory science and patient care gives us the experience to determine whether the individual diagnosis calls for observation or for the most aggressive approach.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for neuroblastoma with treatments that include chemotherapy, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), retinoic acid therapy and antibody therapy (anti-Ch14.18) for aggressive neuroblastoma. City of Hope scientists are working on several research initiatives to develop new therapies for neuroblastoma. Pediatric team members are collaborating on research efforts to bring these therapies to clinical practice.

Wilm's Tumor
Wilm’s tumor is a cancer of the kidney that is curable in most diagnosed children, with a survival rate of more than 90 percent. Usually only surgery and chemotherapy are needed to successfully treat Wilm’s tumor, but in difficult cases, more aggressive treatment, including radiation therapy, may be required. Our long-standing expertise in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) enables aggressive treatment in patients with very advanced disease.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for Wilms tumor.

Other Solid Tumors
Children, adolescents and young adults can have many other types of tumors. As a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is prepared to deliver the best care available with its experienced pediatric oncology team. City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for the variety of cancers seen in children, adolescents and young adults. City of Hope offers expert treatment for the following diseases:
 
  • Germ cell tumors
  • Testicular or ovarian tumors
  • Thyroid cancer*
  • Melanoma
  • Carcinoma of head/neck, including larynx or tongue
  • Rare tumors of children, adolescents and young adults
     
*City of Hope is one of an elite few centers in Southern California offering comprehensive care with collaboration between endocrinology and pediatric oncology.
 
Neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and the other tumors seen in children, adolescents and young adults require a team of experienced professionals to provide comprehensive and family-centered care.  At City of Hope, our pediatric team specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults from birth to 30 years of age. The team includes social workers; child life specialists; recreation, occupational and physical rehabilitation therapists; school reintegration specialists; nutritionists; psychologists; neuropsychologists; and spiritual care specialists.

Meet our team:
 
Clarke Anderson, M.D.
Julie DiMundo, D.O.
James F. Miser, M.D.
Jeanelle Folbrecht, Ph.D.
Natalie Kelly, Ph.D.
Alison Bell, C.P.N.P.
Lisa Gutierrez, P.N.P.
Kayla Fulginiti, M.S.W.
 
In addition to the best medical care available, we also provide access to several support programs, including:
 
  • The  Biller Patient and Family Resource Center
  • Unique support programs for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to assist with the often difficult transition into adulthood at the time of illness
  • Late effects/survivor clinic works with patients long after their treatment to identify, treat and counsel for any issue that might arise related to their life-saving treatment

Our physicians are leading research to find better treatments for children, adolescents and young adults with these tumors. For more information on our pediatric research, including ongoing clinical trials, visit City of Hope’s Clinical Trials Online website.
 

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumors and other Pediatric Cancers

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumor and Other Pediatric Cancers

The Pediatric Oncology Program at City of Hope offers comprehensive, family-centered, leading-edge treatment for childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with neuroblastoma, Wilms Tumor and a wide variety of other benign and malignant solid tumors that require expert care to offer the best chance of cure.

Neuroblastoma
Neuroblastoma, a cancer that develops in immature nerve cells, represents a diagnostic and treatment dilemma that requires expert understanding of the tumor’s biology. At City of Hope, our ground-breaking work in both laboratory science and patient care gives us the experience to determine whether the individual diagnosis calls for observation or for the most aggressive approach.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for neuroblastoma with treatments that include chemotherapy, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), retinoic acid therapy and antibody therapy (anti-Ch14.18) for aggressive neuroblastoma. City of Hope scientists are working on several research initiatives to develop new therapies for neuroblastoma. Pediatric team members are collaborating on research efforts to bring these therapies to clinical practice.

Wilm's Tumor
Wilm’s tumor is a cancer of the kidney that is curable in most diagnosed children, with a survival rate of more than 90 percent. Usually only surgery and chemotherapy are needed to successfully treat Wilm’s tumor, but in difficult cases, more aggressive treatment, including radiation therapy, may be required. Our long-standing expertise in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) enables aggressive treatment in patients with very advanced disease.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for Wilms tumor.

Other Solid Tumors
Children, adolescents and young adults can have many other types of tumors. As a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is prepared to deliver the best care available with its experienced pediatric oncology team. City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for the variety of cancers seen in children, adolescents and young adults. City of Hope offers expert treatment for the following diseases:
 
  • Germ cell tumors
  • Testicular or ovarian tumors
  • Thyroid cancer*
  • Melanoma
  • Carcinoma of head/neck, including larynx or tongue
  • Rare tumors of children, adolescents and young adults
     
*City of Hope is one of an elite few centers in Southern California offering comprehensive care with collaboration between endocrinology and pediatric oncology.
 
Neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and the other tumors seen in children, adolescents and young adults require a team of experienced professionals to provide comprehensive and family-centered care.  At City of Hope, our pediatric team specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults from birth to 30 years of age. The team includes social workers; child life specialists; recreation, occupational and physical rehabilitation therapists; school reintegration specialists; nutritionists; psychologists; neuropsychologists; and spiritual care specialists.

Meet our team:
 
Clarke Anderson, M.D.
Julie DiMundo, D.O.
James F. Miser, M.D.
Jeanelle Folbrecht, Ph.D.
Natalie Kelly, Ph.D.
Alison Bell, C.P.N.P.
Lisa Gutierrez, P.N.P.
Kayla Fulginiti, M.S.W.
 
In addition to the best medical care available, we also provide access to several support programs, including:
 
  • The  Biller Patient and Family Resource Center
  • Unique support programs for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to assist with the often difficult transition into adulthood at the time of illness
  • Late effects/survivor clinic works with patients long after their treatment to identify, treat and counsel for any issue that might arise related to their life-saving treatment

Our physicians are leading research to find better treatments for children, adolescents and young adults with these tumors. For more information on our pediatric research, including ongoing clinical trials, visit City of Hope’s Clinical Trials Online website.
 
Patient Care Overview

City of Hope Locations

Faces of Cancer

Meet City of Hope patients and their families.
 
 
Clinics/Treatments/Services
As a Comprehensive Cancer Center – the highest designation given by the National Cancer Institute – we are widely regarded as a leader in cancer prevention and treatment.

Cancer Expertise Matters


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer often stop responding to the primary drugs used against the disease, leaving them with few options and little hope. Determined to increase those options, doctors and researchers at City of Hope are conducting two clinical trials that could lead to new treatments for pe...
  • Investigators working at City of Hope are making many significant inroads against many forms of cancer. To do that, they have to take a variety of approaches. Molecular oncology researchers focus on abnormal cancer-associated activity in a cell’s nucleus. One especially prominent factor in many breast and ovari...
  • In light of the new breast cancer screening guidelines, which call for women to have mammograms every other year from age 50 to 74, it’s more important than ever for women to understand their individual risk. On Monday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task force released new breast cancer screening guideline...
  • Cancer patients need, and deserve, more than medical care. They and their families need high-quality supportive care – that is, care that addresses their physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. Health care professionals increasingly understand this, but starting such programs from scratch isn’t easy...
  • Each year, City of Hope patients given another chance at life gather to pose for a picture like this one. Going on its 39th year, the celebration of patients free of blood cancers thanks to bone marrow or stem cell transplants has grown such that a photographer has to scale a cherry picker just to […]
  • Cancer patients who are participating in early-stage clinical trials need extra emotional and physical support due to their additional stress and often unique symptoms. Now an effort by researchers at City of Hope to create a model for such support has received a $6.8 million grant from the National Cancer Inst...
  • The need for improvements in treating malignant brain tumors has never been greater. Survival for many patients with these tumors are sometimes measured in just months. One reason that therapeutic options are limited is that traditional surgery is deemed too risky for many brain tumors, especially for those in ...
  • “Honestly, there’s nothing special about my story,” protested Daniel Samson, as he bounced Layla, his 3 1/2-year-old daughter, on his lap and put on a video for her to watch. “I just want to tell it for my own sake, and share it with other men who may be going through this chaos.” Samson spoke […]
  • As far back as he can remember, Jonathan Yamzon, M.D., wanted to be a doctor. “I knew it from the get-go,” he said, matter-of-factly. “I always envisioned it as the ideal; the supreme thing one could do with one’s life.” The youngest of six children, Yamzon was barely a toddler when his family moved to [&...
  • There’s never a “good” time for cancer to strike. With testicular cancer, the timing can seem particularly unfair. This disease targets young adults in the prime of life; otherwise healthy people unaccustomed to any serious illness, let alone cancer. And suddenly … “I can only imagine what they must...
  • Sure, a healthy lifestyle can lower a person’s risk, but the impact of specific actions is harder to tease out. Diet, exercise, tobacco use, nutritional supplements, alcohol consumption … How important are each of these factors, individually? Does strict adherence to (or rejection of) one get you a pass o...
  • Health care decisions are tough. They’re even tougher when you – or loved ones – have to make them without a plan or a conversation. National Healthcare Decisions Day, on April 16,  is a nationwide initiative to demystify the health care decision-making process and encourage families to start talking. Ult...
  • The statistics, direct from the American Cancer Society, are sobering: Cancer death rates among African-American men are 27 percent higher than for white men. The death rate for African-American women is 11 percent higher compared to white women. Hispanics have higher rates of cervical, liver and stomach cancer...
  • “Lucky” is not usually a term used to describe someone diagnosed with cancer.  But that’s how 34-year-old Alex Camargo’s doctor described him when he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer — the disease is one of the most treatable cancers at all stages. That doctor was ultimately proved righ...
  • Geoff Berman, 61, starts his day with the motto: “The sun is up. I’m vertical. It’s a good day.” Ever since he’s been in remission from lymphoma, Berman makes a special point of being grateful for each day, reminding himself that being alive is a gift. “I just enjoy living,” he said. “I give e...