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Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumors and other Pediatric Cancers Bookmark and Share

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumor and Other Pediatric Cancers

The Pediatric Oncology Program at City of Hope offers comprehensive, family-centered, leading-edge treatment for childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with neuroblastoma, Wilms Tumor and a wide variety of other benign and malignant solid tumors that require expert care to offer the best chance of cure.

Neuroblastoma
Neuroblastoma, a cancer that develops in immature nerve cells, represents a diagnostic and treatment dilemma that requires expert understanding of the tumor’s biology. At City of Hope, our ground-breaking work in both laboratory science and patient care gives us the experience to determine whether the individual diagnosis calls for observation or for the most aggressive approach.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for neuroblastoma with treatments that include chemotherapy, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), retinoic acid therapy and antibody therapy (anti-Ch14.18) for aggressive neuroblastoma. City of Hope scientists are working on several research initiatives to develop new therapies for neuroblastoma. Pediatric team members are collaborating on research efforts to bring these therapies to clinical practice.

Wilm's Tumor
Wilm’s tumor is a cancer of the kidney that is curable in most diagnosed children, with a survival rate of more than 90 percent. Usually only surgery and chemotherapy are needed to successfully treat Wilm’s tumor, but in difficult cases, more aggressive treatment, including radiation therapy, may be required. Our long-standing expertise in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) enables aggressive treatment in patients with very advanced disease.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for Wilms tumor.

Other Solid Tumors
Children, adolescents and young adults can have many other types of tumors. As a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is prepared to deliver the best care available with its experienced pediatric oncology team. City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for the variety of cancers seen in children, adolescents and young adults. City of Hope offers expert treatment for the following diseases:
 
  • Germ cell tumors
  • Testicular or ovarian tumors
  • Thyroid cancer*
  • Melanoma
  • Carcinoma of head/neck, including larynx or tongue
  • Rare tumors of children, adolescents and young adults
     
*City of Hope is one of an elite few centers in Southern California offering comprehensive care with collaboration between endocrinology and pediatric oncology.
 
Neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and the other tumors seen in children, adolescents and young adults require a team of experienced professionals to provide comprehensive and family-centered care.  At City of Hope, our pediatric team specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults from birth to 30 years of age. The team includes social workers; child life specialists; recreation, occupational and physical rehabilitation therapists; school reintegration specialists; nutritionists; psychologists; neuropsychologists; and spiritual care specialists.

Meet our team:
 
Clarke Anderson, M.D.
Julie DiMundo, D.O.
James F. Miser, M.D.
Jeanelle Folbrecht, Ph.D.
Natalie Kelly, Ph.D.
Alison Bell, C.P.N.P.
Lisa Gutierrez, P.N.P.
Kayla Fulginiti, M.S.W.
 
In addition to the best medical care available, we also provide access to several support programs, including:
 
  • The  Biller Patient and Family Resource Center
  • Unique support programs for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to assist with the often difficult transition into adulthood at the time of illness
  • Late effects/survivor clinic works with patients long after their treatment to identify, treat and counsel for any issue that might arise related to their life-saving treatment

Our physicians are leading research to find better treatments for children, adolescents and young adults with these tumors. For more information on our pediatric research, including ongoing clinical trials, visit City of Hope’s Clinical Trials Online website.
 

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumors and other Pediatric Cancers

Neuroblastoma, Wilm's Tumor and Other Pediatric Cancers

The Pediatric Oncology Program at City of Hope offers comprehensive, family-centered, leading-edge treatment for childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with neuroblastoma, Wilms Tumor and a wide variety of other benign and malignant solid tumors that require expert care to offer the best chance of cure.

Neuroblastoma
Neuroblastoma, a cancer that develops in immature nerve cells, represents a diagnostic and treatment dilemma that requires expert understanding of the tumor’s biology. At City of Hope, our ground-breaking work in both laboratory science and patient care gives us the experience to determine whether the individual diagnosis calls for observation or for the most aggressive approach.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for neuroblastoma with treatments that include chemotherapy, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), retinoic acid therapy and antibody therapy (anti-Ch14.18) for aggressive neuroblastoma. City of Hope scientists are working on several research initiatives to develop new therapies for neuroblastoma. Pediatric team members are collaborating on research efforts to bring these therapies to clinical practice.

Wilm's Tumor
Wilm’s tumor is a cancer of the kidney that is curable in most diagnosed children, with a survival rate of more than 90 percent. Usually only surgery and chemotherapy are needed to successfully treat Wilm’s tumor, but in difficult cases, more aggressive treatment, including radiation therapy, may be required. Our long-standing expertise in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) enables aggressive treatment in patients with very advanced disease.
 
City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for Wilms tumor.

Other Solid Tumors
Children, adolescents and young adults can have many other types of tumors. As a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is prepared to deliver the best care available with its experienced pediatric oncology team. City of Hope is a member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), which provides access to the nation’s largest group of pediatric and adolescent clinical trials for the variety of cancers seen in children, adolescents and young adults. City of Hope offers expert treatment for the following diseases:
 
  • Germ cell tumors
  • Testicular or ovarian tumors
  • Thyroid cancer*
  • Melanoma
  • Carcinoma of head/neck, including larynx or tongue
  • Rare tumors of children, adolescents and young adults
     
*City of Hope is one of an elite few centers in Southern California offering comprehensive care with collaboration between endocrinology and pediatric oncology.
 
Neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and the other tumors seen in children, adolescents and young adults require a team of experienced professionals to provide comprehensive and family-centered care.  At City of Hope, our pediatric team specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults from birth to 30 years of age. The team includes social workers; child life specialists; recreation, occupational and physical rehabilitation therapists; school reintegration specialists; nutritionists; psychologists; neuropsychologists; and spiritual care specialists.

Meet our team:
 
Clarke Anderson, M.D.
Julie DiMundo, D.O.
James F. Miser, M.D.
Jeanelle Folbrecht, Ph.D.
Natalie Kelly, Ph.D.
Alison Bell, C.P.N.P.
Lisa Gutierrez, P.N.P.
Kayla Fulginiti, M.S.W.
 
In addition to the best medical care available, we also provide access to several support programs, including:
 
  • The  Biller Patient and Family Resource Center
  • Unique support programs for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to assist with the often difficult transition into adulthood at the time of illness
  • Late effects/survivor clinic works with patients long after their treatment to identify, treat and counsel for any issue that might arise related to their life-saving treatment

Our physicians are leading research to find better treatments for children, adolescents and young adults with these tumors. For more information on our pediatric research, including ongoing clinical trials, visit City of Hope’s Clinical Trials Online website.
 
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