A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
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Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute

Hematologic cancers are those cancers that occur in cells of the immune system or in blood-forming tissues including bone marrow. As a pioneer in advancing care for all hematologic cancers and related blood disorders, City of Hope's Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute leads the field as one of the largest and most successful transplant centers in the world.
 
Led by Stephen J. Forman, M.D., Francis & Kathleen McNamara Distinguished Chair in Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, our dedicated, multidisciplinary team of health care professionals combine innovative research discoveries with superior clinical treatments to improve outcomes for patients with:
 
  • Leukemia (cancer of the blood cells)
    • Acute myeloid leukemia
    • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
    • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
    • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Lymphoma (cancer of the lymphatic cells)
    • Hodgkin lymphoma
    • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Myeloma (cancer of plasma cells)
  • Myelodysplastic Syndrome  (serious blood abnormalities that can lead to cancer)
  • Other hematologic disorders
 
 
  • The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Center has ranked City of Hope as an “over-performing” transplant center, and City of Hope is the only U.S. transplant center with this recognition for nine consecutive years.
  • City of Hope recognizes the importance of maintaining contact with all transplant patients to ensure they have optimal outcomes after their treatment have concluded. Established in 1998, our Long-term Follow-up Program follows all patients who have received a transplant at City of Hope. Through this program, our survivors can be carefully monitored for long-term effects and given timely interventions, while our clinicians and researchers have access to data that can be used to further improve cancer treatments.
  • City of Hope's hematology malignancy program integrates both transplant and non-transplant therapies, so there is a smoother transition of treatments for patients who ultimately need a stem cell transplant.
  • City of Hope physicians have extensive experience performing a wide variety of transplant procedures, having performed more than 12,000 transplants—one of the biggest programs in the United States. Our expertise includes both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplants (using cells directly from the patient and from another person, respectively) and transplants using cells derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood.
  • City of Hope’s transplant program is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), the standard of excellence for blood and bone marrow transplant programs in the United States.
 

As a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope is recognized as a leader in cancer treatment, research and education.  Patients at City of Hope have access to innovative clinical trials and nationally recognized experts who are developing novel, more effective methods for treating hematologic cancers and disorders.

Whether newly diagnosed or relapsed, City of Hope patients are cared for by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals, including:
 
  • Hematologists
  • Medical oncologists
  • Radiation oncologists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Dieticians
  • Social workers
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Patient Navigators
  • Chaplains
  • Supportive Care Specialists
 
Together, the patient care team collaborates to design and create integrated, individualized treatment plans using the most promising therapies and up-to-date clinical guidelines to ensure optimal outcomes for patients and their loved ones.
 

If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 

Hematologic Cancers/HCT Team

Research and Clinical Trials

City of Hope is recognized internationally for its breakthrough research discoveries and clinical trials for developing new ways to treat hematologic cancers. Patients at City of Hope will have the ability to enroll in these trials, which can expand their treatment options and improve their outcomes.
 
Highlights of our current efforts include:
 
  • While stem cell transplants can be a lifesaving procedure for patients with hematologic disorders, it also carries a risk of graft versus host disease (GvHD), in which the newly transplanted stem cells do not recognize the recipient’s body as their own and start producing an immune response against it, leading to chronic and potentially serious complications. To reduce the likelihood of GvHD and to improve transplant outcomes, City of Hope is researching new ways to classify and match stem cell donors and recipients.
  • Harnessing the patient’s own immune system against the cancer, specifically through T-cell modification. In this experimental therapy, the patient’s own T-cells are extracted from the body, modified to recognize and attack cancer cells and re-infused back into the patient. This treatment has shown positive results for patients with lymphoma and lymphoid leukemia and is currently being studied for its potential against myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma .
  • Our use and refinement of nonmyeloablative (“mini”) transplants, which relies less on the heavy doses of chemotherapy and radiation and more on the anti-cancer effects of the transplant itself. This novel approach allows otherwise ineligible patients, such as older patients or those who cannot tolerate radiation/chemotherapy-related effects, to be treated with this lifesaving procedure.
  • Continual development and improvement of drug regimens to treat hematologic cancers. Recently, City of Hope had led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma , in whom the drug produced a high rate of response compared to standard therapy.
  • Our scientists are currently investigating leukemia stem cells, which several studies have suggested to cause leukemia. By identifying and eradicating these cancerous stem cells — instead of just the mature leukemia cells that conventional therapies target — a definitive cure for this disease can be achieved. 
 
 
 
If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 

Living with a Hematologic Cancer

City of Hope patients have access to the broad range of services offered by our Department of Supportive Care Medicine. The department’s staff of professionals can give expert assistance in navigating a complex care as well as helping patients and loved ones with a variety of wellness issues including:
 
  • Managing side effects
  • Pain management
  • Coping and maintaining emotional/social/spiritual well-being
  • Staying healthy and active during/after treatment
  • Guidance on eating well and cooking smart
  • Healing arts
  • Being active
  • Building caregivers’ skills
  • Sexual health and fertility
  • Body image
 
 
The Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center is the heart of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine, integrating City of Hope's support services under one umbrella. The Biller Resource Center provides a warm and welcoming space where patients, families and caregivers can access the resources, education and support they need to strengthen and empower themselves, before, during and after treatment.

Our team of supportive care experts includes clinical social workers; pain and palliative care physicians and nurses; psychologists, psychiatrists; patient navigators; health educators; spiritual care chaplains; child life specialists and more. The Biller Resource Center staff may be reached at 626-256-4673, ext. 32273 (3CARE).
 
 
Here you will find tips, tools and resources to help you and your family cope with the issues that arise during and after cancer treatment.
 
Other Resources
 
"A Patient's Guide to Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation at City of Hope" was developed to help City of Hope patients and their families learn about blood and marrow transplantation and what to expect before, during and after transplant at City of Hope.
 
 

If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.

Celebration of Life Bone Marrow Transplant Reunion

Bone marrow transplants offer a second chance for people with life-threatening blood cancers and other hematologic malignancies.  City of Hope performed its first bone marrow transplant in 1976. Since then, thousands of patients from virtually every state and dozens of countries have undergone bone marrow, cord blood or stem cell transplants at City of Hope.

City of Hope invites bone marrow transplant recipients and their families to attend the annual “Celebration of Life" event on the Duarte campus. The reunion has grown to more than 6,500 attendees from all over the United States and overseas. The reunion is a joyous day for everyone in attendance — physicians, nurses and former patients — as they celebrate the victories they have attained in fighting cancer. The day also features performances by former patients who entertain their fellow survivors and their families.

The patient-donor meeting is an emotional highlight of the event. Recipients, though overwhelmed with curiosity and the need to express their gratitude, can only dream of meeting the strangers who saved their lives. City of Hope makes that dream come true for two patients every year.
 
The annual reunion also enables physicians and researchers to advance the science of stem cell transplantation through the sharing of the findings and advances at the Karl G. Blume-Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture held in conjunction with the reunion. The event commemorates the work and dedication of the late Gerhard Schmidt, M.D., who joined City of Hope's hematology program in 1977 and has made numerous contributions to the field throughout this career. Learn more about the Karl G. Blume-Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture in Transplantation Biology & Medicine.

Watch videos, view pictures, read stories and learn more about the Celebration of Life Bone Marrow Transplant Reunion:
 
 
 

Support This Program

It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts − and those of our supporters today − have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables us to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies − helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact us below.

Tina Pakfar, DPPD
Vice President,
Philanthropy
Direct: 626-218-6126
Email: tpakfar@coh.org

 
 

Hematologic Cancers

Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute

Hematologic cancers are those cancers that occur in cells of the immune system or in blood-forming tissues including bone marrow. As a pioneer in advancing care for all hematologic cancers and related blood disorders, City of Hope's Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute leads the field as one of the largest and most successful transplant centers in the world.
 
Led by Stephen J. Forman, M.D., Francis & Kathleen McNamara Distinguished Chair in Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, our dedicated, multidisciplinary team of health care professionals combine innovative research discoveries with superior clinical treatments to improve outcomes for patients with:
 
  • Leukemia (cancer of the blood cells)
    • Acute myeloid leukemia
    • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
    • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
    • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Lymphoma (cancer of the lymphatic cells)
    • Hodgkin lymphoma
    • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Myeloma (cancer of plasma cells)
  • Myelodysplastic Syndrome  (serious blood abnormalities that can lead to cancer)
  • Other hematologic disorders
 
 
  • The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Center has ranked City of Hope as an “over-performing” transplant center, and City of Hope is the only U.S. transplant center with this recognition for nine consecutive years.
  • City of Hope recognizes the importance of maintaining contact with all transplant patients to ensure they have optimal outcomes after their treatment have concluded. Established in 1998, our Long-term Follow-up Program follows all patients who have received a transplant at City of Hope. Through this program, our survivors can be carefully monitored for long-term effects and given timely interventions, while our clinicians and researchers have access to data that can be used to further improve cancer treatments.
  • City of Hope's hematology malignancy program integrates both transplant and non-transplant therapies, so there is a smoother transition of treatments for patients who ultimately need a stem cell transplant.
  • City of Hope physicians have extensive experience performing a wide variety of transplant procedures, having performed more than 12,000 transplants—one of the biggest programs in the United States. Our expertise includes both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplants (using cells directly from the patient and from another person, respectively) and transplants using cells derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood.
  • City of Hope’s transplant program is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), the standard of excellence for blood and bone marrow transplant programs in the United States.
 

As a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope is recognized as a leader in cancer treatment, research and education.  Patients at City of Hope have access to innovative clinical trials and nationally recognized experts who are developing novel, more effective methods for treating hematologic cancers and disorders.

Whether newly diagnosed or relapsed, City of Hope patients are cared for by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals, including:
 
  • Hematologists
  • Medical oncologists
  • Radiation oncologists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Dieticians
  • Social workers
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Patient Navigators
  • Chaplains
  • Supportive Care Specialists
 
Together, the patient care team collaborates to design and create integrated, individualized treatment plans using the most promising therapies and up-to-date clinical guidelines to ensure optimal outcomes for patients and their loved ones.
 

If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 

Hematologic Cancers Team

Hematologic Cancers/HCT Team

Research / Clinical Trials

Research and Clinical Trials

City of Hope is recognized internationally for its breakthrough research discoveries and clinical trials for developing new ways to treat hematologic cancers. Patients at City of Hope will have the ability to enroll in these trials, which can expand their treatment options and improve their outcomes.
 
Highlights of our current efforts include:
 
  • While stem cell transplants can be a lifesaving procedure for patients with hematologic disorders, it also carries a risk of graft versus host disease (GvHD), in which the newly transplanted stem cells do not recognize the recipient’s body as their own and start producing an immune response against it, leading to chronic and potentially serious complications. To reduce the likelihood of GvHD and to improve transplant outcomes, City of Hope is researching new ways to classify and match stem cell donors and recipients.
  • Harnessing the patient’s own immune system against the cancer, specifically through T-cell modification. In this experimental therapy, the patient’s own T-cells are extracted from the body, modified to recognize and attack cancer cells and re-infused back into the patient. This treatment has shown positive results for patients with lymphoma and lymphoid leukemia and is currently being studied for its potential against myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma .
  • Our use and refinement of nonmyeloablative (“mini”) transplants, which relies less on the heavy doses of chemotherapy and radiation and more on the anti-cancer effects of the transplant itself. This novel approach allows otherwise ineligible patients, such as older patients or those who cannot tolerate radiation/chemotherapy-related effects, to be treated with this lifesaving procedure.
  • Continual development and improvement of drug regimens to treat hematologic cancers. Recently, City of Hope had led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma , in whom the drug produced a high rate of response compared to standard therapy.
  • Our scientists are currently investigating leukemia stem cells, which several studies have suggested to cause leukemia. By identifying and eradicating these cancerous stem cells — instead of just the mature leukemia cells that conventional therapies target — a definitive cure for this disease can be achieved. 
 
 
 
If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 

Living with a Hematologic Cancer

Living with a Hematologic Cancer

City of Hope patients have access to the broad range of services offered by our Department of Supportive Care Medicine. The department’s staff of professionals can give expert assistance in navigating a complex care as well as helping patients and loved ones with a variety of wellness issues including:
 
  • Managing side effects
  • Pain management
  • Coping and maintaining emotional/social/spiritual well-being
  • Staying healthy and active during/after treatment
  • Guidance on eating well and cooking smart
  • Healing arts
  • Being active
  • Building caregivers’ skills
  • Sexual health and fertility
  • Body image
 
 
The Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center is the heart of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine, integrating City of Hope's support services under one umbrella. The Biller Resource Center provides a warm and welcoming space where patients, families and caregivers can access the resources, education and support they need to strengthen and empower themselves, before, during and after treatment.

Our team of supportive care experts includes clinical social workers; pain and palliative care physicians and nurses; psychologists, psychiatrists; patient navigators; health educators; spiritual care chaplains; child life specialists and more. The Biller Resource Center staff may be reached at 626-256-4673, ext. 32273 (3CARE).
 
 
Here you will find tips, tools and resources to help you and your family cope with the issues that arise during and after cancer treatment.
 
Other Resources
 
"A Patient's Guide to Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation at City of Hope" was developed to help City of Hope patients and their families learn about blood and marrow transplantation and what to expect before, during and after transplant at City of Hope.
 
 

If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.

Transplant Reunion

Celebration of Life Bone Marrow Transplant Reunion

Bone marrow transplants offer a second chance for people with life-threatening blood cancers and other hematologic malignancies.  City of Hope performed its first bone marrow transplant in 1976. Since then, thousands of patients from virtually every state and dozens of countries have undergone bone marrow, cord blood or stem cell transplants at City of Hope.

City of Hope invites bone marrow transplant recipients and their families to attend the annual “Celebration of Life" event on the Duarte campus. The reunion has grown to more than 6,500 attendees from all over the United States and overseas. The reunion is a joyous day for everyone in attendance — physicians, nurses and former patients — as they celebrate the victories they have attained in fighting cancer. The day also features performances by former patients who entertain their fellow survivors and their families.

The patient-donor meeting is an emotional highlight of the event. Recipients, though overwhelmed with curiosity and the need to express their gratitude, can only dream of meeting the strangers who saved their lives. City of Hope makes that dream come true for two patients every year.
 
The annual reunion also enables physicians and researchers to advance the science of stem cell transplantation through the sharing of the findings and advances at the Karl G. Blume-Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture held in conjunction with the reunion. The event commemorates the work and dedication of the late Gerhard Schmidt, M.D., who joined City of Hope's hematology program in 1977 and has made numerous contributions to the field throughout this career. Learn more about the Karl G. Blume-Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture in Transplantation Biology & Medicine.

Watch videos, view pictures, read stories and learn more about the Celebration of Life Bone Marrow Transplant Reunion:
 
 
 

Support This Program

Support This Program

It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts − and those of our supporters today − have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables us to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies − helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact us below.

Tina Pakfar, DPPD
Vice President,
Philanthropy
Direct: 626-218-6126
Email: tpakfar@coh.org

 
 
Quick Links
Why City of Hope
Stephen J. Forman, Francis and Kathleen McNamara Distinguished Chair in Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, talks about why City of Hope is a special place for cancer treatment.
 
Hematologic Cancers Support Groups
How to Become a Cure

 
What is a blood stem cell transplant? A remarkably effective treatment for leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma - and many other diseases of the blood and bone marrow. This video shows the fascinating and dramatic journey of a blood stem cell donation all the way from a donor to a patient in need. Find out how you can become a bone marrow or stem cell donor »
Faces of Cancer

Meet City of Hope patients and their families.
 
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Brain cancer may be one of the most-frightening diagnoses people can receive, striking at the very center of who we are as individuals. Further, it often develops over time, causing no symptoms until it’s already advanced. Listen to City of Hope Radio as Behnam Badie, M.D., director of the Brain Tumor Pro...
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  • When Maryland Governor Larry Hogan announced earlier this week that he has the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, he was giving voice to the experience of more than 71,000 Americans each year. The announcement came with Hogan’s promise to stay in office while undergoing aggressive treatment for the...
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  • Although most cancer occurs in older adults, the bulk of cancer research doesn’t focus on this vulnerable and fast-growing population. City of Hope and its Cancer and Aging Research Team aim to change that, and they’re getting a significant boost from Professional Practice Leader Peggy Burhenn, R.N....
  • Liz Graef-Larcher’s first brain tumor was discovered by accident six years ago. The then-48-year-old with a long history of sinus problems and headaches had been sent for an MRI, and the scan found a lesion in her brain called a meningioma – a tumor that arises in the meninges, the layers of tissue that cover a...
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  • Jana Portnow, M.D., associate director of the Brain Tumor Program at City of Hope, didn’t expect to specialize in treating brain tumors. But, early in her career, she undertook a year of research on pain management and palliative care and, in that program, got to know many patients with brain tumors. After that...
  • Ask any patient: Nurses are as pivotal in their care as doctors. They answer the call of a patient in the middle of the night, they hold the patient’s hand as he or she takes on yet another round of treatment and, in the best-case scenario, they wave goodbye as the patient leaves the hospital, […]
  • Many oncologists, not to mention their patients, might think that there’s no place for mathematical analysis in the treatment of cancer. They might think that all treatment decisions are based on unique factors affecting individual patients, with no connection to other patients and their treatment regimen...
  • Within three days in 2007, Stephanie Hosford, then 37, learned that she was pregnant with her long-awaited second child – and that she had triple-negative breast cancer. Soon afterward, Hosford discovered that she and her husband, Grant, had been approved to adopt a little girl from China.  After encountering m...
  • That’s not an echo you hear, it’s another study linking weight to breast cancer risk. It’s also another reason to improve the health of our overall community. In a report published online June 11 in the journal JAMA Oncology, researchers have concluded that women who are both obese and postmenopausal face...
  • Cancer and other life-threatening illnesses can be overwhelming experiences for adults. For children, who lack the life experience and context to put their diagnosis in perspective, the treatment and follow-up can be especially isolating. City of Hope’s youngest patients recently got a chance to overcome that i...
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