A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Fundraising Offices
City of Hope’s eight fundraising offices around the country make it easy for you to join supporters in your area to bring new hope to those fighting life-threatening diseases. Contact one today to get involved.
 

Join our team and help lead the way to cures for cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and more.
 
 
Watch a video and learn why we live to cure cancer.
 
 
For 100 years, we’ve been a global leader in the fight against cancer, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS. Hope powers our dream of curing diseases that affect millions of people worldwide. We need help from people like you. Become a Citizen of Hope, and join us in the fight to save lives all over the world.
Give to City of Hope
When you support City of Hope, you help us shorten the time it takes to get from bold, innovative ideas to powerful new medical, cancer and diabetes treatments.
 

Help us help you. Many of the patients and families whose lives we've touched choose to say "thank you" by contributing to our mission. Learn more.
 
A gift left to City of Hope in your will or trust is an opportunity to communicate your values and your dreams for the future. Learn about easy ways to create your legacy.

 
Shop your favorite things on AmazonSmile and Amazon will donate a percentage of your purchase to City of Hope. Learn more.
Ranked as one of  "America’s Best Hospitals"  in cancer by U.S.News & World Report, City of Hope is a pioneer in the fields of hematopoietic cell transplantation and genetics. Designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest honor bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope's research and treatment protocols advance care throughout the world.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Surgery for head and neck cancers is unarguably complex, requiring extremely controlled movements and exceptional training. “Given where we are operating, our primary concern is maintaining speaking, swallowing and breathing,” said Ellie Maghami, M.D., chief of head and neck surgery, who recently teamed with Ro...
  • Henry Ford said it well: “Working together is success.” For biomedical researchers, this is especially true. The challenges they face often require expertise from multiple fields to find answers and solutions. Scientists seeking cures for type 1 diabetes in particular must overcome biological, medical and techn...
  • Superheroes are making plenty of headlines as the summer blockbuster season opens. At City of Hope, a 9-year-old girl wept as she hugged her own superhero: someone who had the superpower of healing her cancer. He didn’t wear flashy armor or a cape, but rather a plaid shirt. He doesn’t have a secret ...
  • Known for his ability to bring together, and lead, effective research teams, world-renowned translational research scientist and physician Larry W. Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., has joined City of Hope in a key leadership role within the institution’s new Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Instit...
  • To detect melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, at its earliest, most treatable stage, conduct a head-to-toe skin self-examination once a month to check for suspicious moles.   Unusual, or atypical, moles can ultimately develop into skin cancer. Here is the ABCDE guide to potentially cancerous mol...
  • “Superheroes,” “grateful” and “lifesavers”: All are words patients have used to describe their bone marrow donors. For donors, “a great feeling” and “the right thing to do” seems to sum up their view of donating the stem cells used to save someone’s life. Bone marrow transplants of...
  • Updated: May 1, 2015 More than a decade after joining the bone marrow registry during a blood drive at the United States Military Academy at West Point, Phil Ratcliff received a call that he was a match for a leukemia patient. By then, he’d left his military career to start his own financial business, married [...
  • Updated: May 1. For Lars Nijland, the reason to become a member of a bone marrow registry was simple. “I always thought there would be no easier way to save somebody’s life,” said the 24-year-old student at Germany’s University of Goettingen, who signed up for the registry during a drive on his campus. Ni...
  • Updated: May 1 No parent ever wants to see their child hurting or sick in any way. Joanne Cooper’s daughter Amanda wasn’t sick, though. She seemed healthy. Vibrant. A straight-A student whose only major health ailment had been bouts of stress-related nausea. Then a blood test revealed that Amanda – now 9 years ...
  • Noe Chavez became animated when he recalled the story: “We were running a health event, screening folks for diabetes,” said the enthusiastic City of Hope population health researcher, “and this man comes over and starts talking to us about the trouble he’s having with his eyes. I spoke with him, listened ...
  • When Keith McKinny, 29, was first diagnosed with lymphoma and leukemia in 2010, the first person he thought of was former boyfriend Jason Mullins. The two hadn’t been in contact with each other for some time, but McKinny couldn’t think of anyone else with whom he wanted to be during that difficult period....
  • Updated: May 1 Yesenia Portillo’s search for a bone marrow donor started close to home. Her brother, sister and seven cousins all underwent testing, but none of them were a close enough match to donate the bone marrow stem cells she desperately needed for her transplant. Yesenia, now almost 16, had always been ...
  • Some of City of Hope’s most high-impact achievements have arisen from City of Hope’s globally recognized bone marrow transplant (BMT) program. The annual Karl G. Blume – Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture in Transplantation Biology & Medicine — commemorating two of the most influential and revered...
  • Guido Marcucci, M.D., wants to put himself out of business. A respected clinician and esteemed basic and translational scientist, Marcucci joins City of Hope as co-director of the Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research within the Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute. In this positi...
  • To say that myelofibrosis patients need more treatment options would be an understatement. The severely low platelet counts, known as thrombocytopenia, that are one of the hallmark symptoms of the disease can lead to chronic fatigue and weakness that not only damage quality of life but, ultimately, shorten life...