A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our People

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Equipping the immune system to fight cancer – a disease that thrives on mutations and circumventing the body’s natural defenses – is within reach. In fact, City of Hope researchers are testing one approach in clinical trials now. Scientists take a number of steps to turn cancer patients’ T cells – white b...
  • As treatments for lung cancer become more targeted and effective, the need for better technology to detect lung cancer mutations becomes increasingly important. A new clinical study at City of Hope is examining the feasibility of using blood and urine tests to detect lung cancer mutations, potentially allowing ...
  • When it comes to breast cancer risk, insulin levels may matter more than weight, new research has found. The study from Imperial College London School of Public Health, published in the journal Cancer Research, indicates that metabolic health – not a person’s weight or body mass index – increases breast cancer ...
  • No one ever plans to have cancer – and there’s never a good time. For Homa Sadat, her cancer came at a particularly bad time: just one year after losing her father to the pancreatic cancer he had battled for two years. She was working a grueling schedule managing three commercial office buildings. She’d just [&...
  • Patients at City of Hope – most of whom are fighting cancer – rely on more than 37,000 units of blood and platelets each year for their treatment and survival. Every one of those units comes from family, friends or someone who traded an hour or so of their time and a pint of their […]
  • Surgery is vital in the treatment of cancer – it’s used to help diagnose, treat and even prevent the disease – so a new colorectal cancer study linking a decrease in surgeries for advanced cancer to increased survival rates may raise more questions than it answers for some patients. The surgery-and-surviv...
  • Age is the single greatest risk factor overall for cancer; our chances of developing the disease rise steeply after age 50. For geriatric oncology nurse Peggy Burhenn, the meaning is clear: Cancer is primarily a geriatric condition. That’s why she is forging inroads in the care of older adults with cancer. Burh...
  • One of American’s great sportscasters, Stuart Scott, passed away from recurrent cancer of the appendix at the young age of 49. His cancer was diagnosed when he was only 40 years old. It was found during an operation for appendicitis. His courageous fight against this disease began in 2007, resumed again with an...
  • When Homa Sadat found a lump in her breast at age 27, her gynecologist told her what many doctors say to young women: You’re too young to have breast cancer. With the lump dismissed as a harmless cyst, she didn’t think about it again until she was at a restaurant six months later and felt […]
  • What most people call a “bone marrow transplant” is not actually a transplant of bone marrow; it is instead the transplantation of what’s known as hematopoietic stem cells. Such cells are often taken from bone marrow, but not always. Hematopoietic stem cells are simply immature cells that can ...
  • Doctors have long known that women with a precancerous condition called atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of breast cancer. Now a new study has found that the risk is more serious than previously thought. Hyperplasia itself is an overgrowth of cells; atypical hyperplasia is an overgrowth in a distorted...
  • Don’t kid yourself. Just because it’s mid-January doesn’t mean it’s too late to make resolutions for a happier, and healthier, 2015. Just consider them resolutions that are more mature than those giddy, sometimes self-deluded, Jan. 1 resolutions. To that end, we share some advice from Cary A. Presant, M.D., an ...
  • Sales and marketing executive Jim Murphy first came to City of Hope in 2002 to donate blood for a friend who was being treated for esophageal cancer. The disease is serious. Although esophageal cancer accounts for only about 1 percent of cancer diagnoses in the U.S., only about 20 percent of patients survive at...
  • Aaron Bomar and his family were celebrating his daughter’s 33rd birthday in September 2014 when he received alarming news: According to an X-ray taken earlier that day at an urgent care facility, he had a node on his aorta and was in danger of an aneurysm. Bomar held hands with his wife and daughter and s...
  • Explaining a prostate cancer diagnosis to a young child can be difficult — especially when the cancer is incurable. But conveying the need for prostate cancer research, as it turns out, is easily done. And that leads to action. Earlier this year, Gerald Rustad, 71, who is living with a very aggressive form of m...