A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Our People Bookmark and Share

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our People

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • The physical side effects of cancer can damage anyone’s self-confidence, but especially that of women who, rightly or wrongly, are more likely to find their appearance (or their own perception of their appearance) directly connected to their ability to face the world with something resembling ap...
  • The promise of stem cell therapy has long been studied in laboratories. Now, as medicine enters an era in which this therapy will be increasingly available to patients, the nurses who help deliver it will be in the spotlight. City of Hope, which has launched its Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT...
  • Just because you can treat a condition, such as high cholesterol, at the end of life — well, that doesn’t mean you should. That’s the basic lesson of a study to be published March 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The ramifications go far beyond that. The research, in which City of Hope’s Betty Fe...
  • The understanding of the relationship between genetics and cancer risk continues to grow, with more genetic testing than ever before available to patients. However, the adage that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is applicable: Without context for what a test result means, and without meaningful guidance...
  • Standard prostate biopsies haven’t changed significantly in the past 30 years – nor have the problems inherent with them. Regular biopsies have an expected error rate: Tumors may potentially be undersampled and, 30 percent of the time, men who undergo a radical prostatectomy are found to have more aggress...
  • In the field of cancer, patients have had surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy as options. Now, as City of Hope officially opens the Alpha Clinic for Cellular Therapy and Innovation, patients battling cancer and other life-threatening diseases have another option: stem-cell-based therapy. The Alpha Clini...
  • How does the environment affect our health? Specifically, how does it affect our risk of cancer? City of Hope physicians and researchers recently answered those questions in an Ask the Experts event in Corona, California, explaining the underlying facts about how the environment can affect our health. Moderator...
  • Nurses and other medical professionals have come to understand that it’s not enough just to fight disease. They also must provide pain relief, symptom control, and an unrelenting commitment to improve patients’ quality of life — especially at the end of life. Not too long ago, this was a relatively ...
  • “Tonight, I’m launching a new precision medicine initiative to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer.” These were the words of President Barack Obama on Jan. 20, 2015, during his State of the Union address. So what is precision medicine, and how close are we to making it a reality for...
  • March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. How sad, yet how serendipitous, that the co-creator of “The Simpsons” Sam Simon passed away in March after a four-year battle against colon cancer. What message can we all learn from his illness that can help us prevent and overcome colon cancer in our own lives? Colon can...
  • Misagh Karimi, M.D., assistant clinical professor, is a medical oncologist at one of City of Hope’s newest community practice locations, located in Corona in Riverside County. A recent community health report from Corona’s public health department stated that obesity rates for teens and adults in Riverside Coun...
  • In 1975, the median survival for patients with ovarian cancer was about 12 months. Today, the median survival is more than 5 years. Although researchers and clinicians are far from satisfied, the progress in ovarian cancer treatment is encouraging, said Robert Morgan, M.D., F.A.C.P., professor of medical oncolo...
  • Colorectal cancer may be one of the most common cancers in both men and women, but it’s also one of the most curable cancers. Today, because of effective screening tests and more advanced treatment options, there are more than 1 million survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States. Here, colorectal...
  • Breast cancer treatment can damage a woman’s ability to become pregnant, making the impact on fertility one of the key factors that many consider when choosing a therapy regimen. Now a study has found that breast cancer patients treated with a hormone-blocking drug in addition to chemotherapy were less li...
  • My colleagues in the clinic know I’ve got a soft spot. Last week, a patient of mine offered me a fantastic compliment. “You’re looking younger these days, Dr. Pal!” she said, offering me a big hug as she proceeded out of the clinic room. Lovely, I thought. The early morning workouts are paying off. She continue...