A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
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City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our People

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Cancer research has yielded scientific breakthroughs that offer patients more options, more hope for survival and a higher quality of life than ever before. The 14.5 million cancer patients living in the United States are living proof that cancer research saves lives. Now, in addition to the clinic, hospital an...
  • Advances in cancer treatment, built on discoveries made in the laboratory then brought to the bedside, have phenomenally changed the reality of living with a cancer diagnosis. More than any other time in history, people diagnosed with cancer are more likely to survive and to enjoy a high quality of life. Howeve...
  • While health care reform has led to an increase in the number of people signing up for health insurance, many people remain uninsured or are not taking full advantage of the health benefits they now have. Still others are finding that, although their premiums are affordable, they aren’t able to see the do...
  • Kidney cancer rates and thyroid cancer rates in adults have continued to rise year after year. Now a new study has found that incidence rates for these cancers are also increasing in children — particularly in African-American children. The study, published online this month in Pediatrics, examined childhood ca...
  • Thyroid cancer has become one of the fastest-growing cancers in the United States for both men and women. The chance of being diagnosed with the cancer has nearly doubled since 1990. This year an estimated 63,000 people will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer in the United States and nearly 1,900 people will die ...
  • Older teenagers and young adults traditionally face worse outcomes than younger children when diagnosed with brain cancer and other central nervous system tumors. A first-of-its-kind study shows why. A team of researchers from the departments of Population Sciences and Pathology at City of Hope recently examine...
  • Cancer treatment can take a toll on the mouth, even if a patient’s cancer has nothing to do with the head or throat, leading to a dry mouth, or a very sore mouth, and making it difficult to swallow or eat. Here’s some advice from the National Cancer Institute (NCI)  on how to ease cancer-related dis...
  • Radiation oncology is one of the three main specialties involved in the successful treatment of cancer, along with surgical oncology and medical oncology. Experts in this field, known as radiation oncologists, advise patients as to whether radiation therapy will be useful for their cancer – and how it can best ...
  • There’s more to cancer care than simply helping patients survive. There’s more to cancer treatment than simple survival. Constant pain should not be part of conquering cancer,  insists Betty Ferrell, Ph.D., R.N., director of nursing research and education at City of Hope. She wants patients and caregivers...
  • Even its name is daunting. Systemic mastocytosis is a fatal disease of the blood with no known cure. But a new study suggests a bone marrow transplant may be the answer for some patients. While rare, systemic mastocytosis is resistant to treatment with drugs and, when aggressive, can be fatal within four years ...
  • Could what you eat affect the health of your chromosomes? The short answer is, “Yes.” Researchers led by Dustin Schones, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, and Rama Natarajan, Ph.D., director of the Division of Molecular Diabetes Research and the National Business Products Industry ...
  • September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Here, Bertram Yuh, M.D., assistant clinical professor in the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope, explains the importance of understanding the risk factors for the disease and ways to reduce those risks, as well as overall prostate health. “Wha...
  • ** Learn more about prostate health, plus prostate cancer research and treatment, at City of Hope. ** Learn more about getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting us online or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help yo...
  • Childhood cancer survival rates have increased dramatically over the past 40 years. More than 80 percent of children with cancer now survive five years or more, which is a tremendous feat. Despite the survival rate increase, cancer continues to be the No. 1 disease killer and second-leading cause of death in ch...
  • Although a stem cell transplant can be a lifesaving procedure for people diagnosed with a blood cancer or blood disorder, the standard transplant may not be appropriate for all patients. This is because the conditioning regimen (the intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation treatments preceding the transplant) is...