A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our People

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Ryan Chavira was a senior in high school when she began feeling sluggish, fatigued and, well, “down.” Trips to the doctor ended in “you’re fine” pronouncements; blood tests results showed nothing of real concern. But Chavira’s grandmother had passed away from ovarian cancer when she was in eig...
  • Brain tumors are exceptionally difficult to treat. They can be removed surgically, but individual cancer cells may have already spread elsewhere in the brain and can escape the effects of both radiation and chemotherapy. To prevent tumors from recurring, doctors need a way to find and stop those invasive cancer...
  • Breast cancer risk is personal; breast cancer risk assessment should be, too. To that end, City of Hope researchers have developed a starting point to help women (and their doctors) with a family history of the disease begin that risk assessment process. The result is an iPhone app, called BRISK, for Breast Can...
  • When it comes to breast cancer, women aren’t limited to getting screened and, if diagnosed, making appropriate treatment choices. They can also take a proactive stance in the fight against breast cancer by understanding key risk factors and practicing lifestyle habits that can help reduce their own breast...
  • Cancers of the blood and immune system are considered to be among the most difficult-to-treat cancers. A world leader in the treatment of blood cancers, City of Hope is now launching an institute specifically focused on treating people with lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma, as well as other serious blood and bone...
  • Genetics, genes, genome, genetic risk … Such terms are becoming increasingly familiar to even nonresearchers as studies and information about the human make-up become more extensive and more critical. At City of Hope, these words have long been part of our vocabulary. Researchers and physicians are studyi...
  • Mammograms are currently the best method to detect breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat and before it’s big enough to feel or cause symptoms. But recent mammogram screening guidelines may have left some women confused about when to undergo annual testing. Here Lusi Tumyan, M.D., chief of t...
  • Although chemotherapy can be effective in treating cancer, it can also exact a heavy toll on a patient’s health. One impressive alternative researchers have found is in the form of a vaccine. A type of immunotherapy, one part of the vaccine primes the body to react strongly against a tumor; the second part dire...
  • The breast cancer statistic is attention-getting: One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. That doesn’t mean that, if you’re one of eight women at a dinner table, one of you is fated to have breast cancer (read more on that breast cancer statistic), but it does mean that the ...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. In his first post, ...
  • Advanced age tops the list among breast cancer risk factor for women. Not far behind is family history and genetics. Two City of Hope researchers delving deep into these issues recently received important grants to advance their studies. Arti Hurria, M.D., director of the Cancer and Aging Research Program, and ...
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...