A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our People

City of Hope is transforming the future of health... It starts with our people.

Diversity and Inclusion Council
The council helps raise visibility of the role of diversity and inclusion at City of Hope and provide a platform from which to promote both diversity and inclusion. It leverages existing efforts by creating synergies among entities leading current efforts and develop strategies to further our efforts and address emerging needs.
 
 
Diversity Resource Groups
A Diversity Resource Group is a voluntary, member-led group of people who work or study at City of Hope and share a common identity, interest, or goal and whose engagement and efforts support City of Hope’s mission, values and/or strategy. Formed to encourage networking, foster diversity and inclusion and support our mission, these groups provide opportunities for community involvement and professional development. Diversity resource groups fulfill a purpose mutually identified by members and by the organization. Diversity resource groups are open to anyone interested in the focus of the group.
 
  • Asian American Community recently sponsored a Chinese New Year Celebration.
  • Connecting People of African Descent recently co-sponsored a “Steps in the City” event, a 1-mile walk with a diabetes education component.
  • Latinos for Hope recently sponsored an Easter Basket campaign, providing baskets to inpatient and outpatient pediatric patients as well as to children in the local community.
  • Pinoys4Hope recently sponsored a blood drive at the Westfield West Covina mall which resulted in 69 registered donors for the City of Hope Blood Donor Center.
  • Young Professionals Network has been hosting a variety of cross-functional lunch and learns to help increase knowledge about various departments and encourage networking.
 
Hiring
We believe our diverse workforce is a major component of our success. We are an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color national origin, sex, age, status as a  protected veteran , or status as a qualified individual with disability.  
 
Learning Opportunities
City of Hope is committed to intellectual curiosity. We cultivate life-long learning about diversity and inclusion with regular workshops and seminars. These learning opportunities ensure our staff have the skills and knowledge they need to provide culturally competent care and work in our diverse environment.
 
Lunch and Learns feature the expertise of our community members. Lucille Leong, M.D. spoke about cultural competence and meeting patients where they are. Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H. highlighted the important research being conducted to reduce health disparities. The Be The Match program inspired us to sign up on the registry, recognizing that the best chance of finding a bone marrow match comes from one’s ethnic group.
 
Learning and Personal Development Week offers City of Hope community members the opportunity develop knowledge and skills on a wide variety of topics. Diversity is a key component during the week, including sessions such as “Religious Perspectives on Death and Dying” and “Everyday Diversity and Inclusion.”
 
Scott Page, author of The Difference and speaker for a Management Development Forum program, demonstrated how important diversity is in solving the complex problems of our time. His key insight, which aligns with our philosophy of diversity, is that people who have different perspectives, mindsets and problem-solving strategies can solve problems more effectively than groups of “experts.”
 
In One City of Hope, One Story, our community book club, we read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, which tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cancer cells were taken in the in1950s and used for medical and scientific research throughout the world. Her son, David “Sonny” Lacks and granddaughter , Kim Lacks, visited City of Hope and toured the labs of Linda Malkas, Ph.D. and Bob Hickey, Ph.D.
 
Observances and Events
City of Hope honors important and relevant cultural and religious events relevant to our people and patients. One of our most popular events is National Diversity Day, which is celebrated on the first Friday in October, during which we showcase the talents and cultures of those who work or study at City of Hope.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Cancer cells are voracious eaters. Like a swarm of locusts, they devour every edible tidbit they can find. But unlike locusts, when the food is gone, cancer cells can’t just move on to the next horn o’ plenty. They have to survive until more food shows up — and they do. Mei Kong, Ph.D., assistant […]
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Repr...
  • When 25-year-old Angelina Mattos was diagnosed with Stage 4 oral cancer earlier this year, she learned that her only hope of survival was through the removal of her tongue, a surgery that leaves people without the ability to talk or eat normally, sometimes permanently ending their ability to speak. After hearin...
  • Two years ago, Joselyn Miller and her family sat together as stem cells from her brother’s bone marrow were infused into her – a precious gift of life that the family is excited to have the chance to pass to another patient in need. Today, the stem cell recipient is healthy. Her 23-year-old son Rex, who […...
  • Even as the overall rate of oral cancers in the United States steadily declines, the rate of tongue cancer is increasing — especially among white females ages 18 to 44. An oral cancer diagnosis, although rare, is serious. Only half of the people diagnosed with oral cancer are still alive after five years, accor...
  • Sometimes cancer found in the lungs is not lung cancer at all. It can be another type of cancer that originated elsewhere in the body and spread, or metastasized, to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These tumors are called lung metastases, or metastatic cancer to the lungs, and are not the...
  • When it comes to research into the treatment of hematologic cancers, City of Hope scientists stand out. One study that  they presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology suggests a new standard of care for HIV-associated lymphoma, another offers promise for the treatment of re...
  • Patients with HIV-associated lymphoma may soon have increased access to the current standard of care for some non-HIV infected patients – autologous stem cell transplants. Impressive new data, presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Francisco, indicate that HIV-...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
  • The holidays can create an overwhelming urge to give to people in need — especially to sick children and families spending the holidays in a hospital room. That’s a good thing. Holiday donations of toys and gifts can bolster the spirits, and improve the lives, of people affected by illness, and hospitals ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
  • Cancer has a way of “talking” to the immune system and corrupting it to work on its own behalf instead of defending the body. Blocking this communication would allow the immune system to see cancer cells for what they are – something to be fought off – and stop them from growing. A breakthrough Scientists [R...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...