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Cytogenetics Core Laboratory

City of Hope’s Cytogenetics Core Laboratory, supported by the National Cancer Institute-funded Cancer Center Support Grant, provides classic and molecular cytogenetics [fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)] services to Beckman Research Institute researchers, as well as non-City of Hope investigators. FISH testing has proved invaluable as a diagnostic tool in many types of malignancies and is useful in determining both prognosis and course of treatment. The equipment in the Cytogenetics Core Laboratory is available to researchers on an appointment basis. The laboratory also provides training and consultation services in molecular cytogenetic testing.

Services and Equipment

Cytogenetics Core services available include:
  • Cell line characterization and tumor bank storage
  • Solid tumor cytogenetic analysis
  • FISH analysis /FISH enumeration only
  • Genotype-phenotype correlation via immunocytochemistry/FISH analysis
  • Gene mapping
  • Photomicrography Human 24-color karyotyping (SKY)
  • Mouse 20-color karyotyping (SKY)
  • HUMARA clonality assay
  • Human 19K BAC array analysis (DNA to data)
  • Consultation and training services
 
 
Probes Utilized
The Cytogenetics Core Laboratory has experience with all commercially-available probes (e.g., chromosome enumeration probes, painting probes, single copy or locus-specific probes, translocation probes, human and mouse SKY probes, etc.) and nick-translated DNA fragments provided by researchers as “homebrew” probes (nick translocation labeling may be performed by Cytogenetics Core lab personnel). The DNA fragments may be genomic DNA, cDNA or vector DNA; however, due to sensitivity limitations of our current instrumentation, unique sequence probes larger than 2.5 kb are required for mapping studies. If the probe is known to be amplified, probes larger than 1 kb may be used.
 

Equipment
The Cytogenetics Core Laboratory is equipped with high-resolution fluorescent and light photomicroscopes, and three computerized imaging systems (including the SKY Applied Spectral Imaging System and the Bioview System), which are able to capture, process and print microscopic images. Tissue culture facilities and equipment for probe labeling and hybridization are also available.

 

Fluorochromes commonly used with our fluorescent microscopes:
The fluorescent microscopes in the Cytogenetics Core are optimized for observation of the fluorochromes listed below. However, fluorochromes with similar excitation and emission wavelengths as those listed below may also be observed with our systems.

 

 

Fluorochrome                                                   Emission (nm)
FITC or Fluorescein (green)                           520
Texas-red (red)                                                  620
Rhodamine (red)                                              590
DAPI (blue)                                                         452
Spectrum green                                                538
Spectrum red                                                     612
Spectrum orange                                              588
Aqua                                                                    480
 
Applied Spectral Imaging SKY System

 
Bioview System
 
The Bioview Duet capture screen displaying a live fluorescent image (left) with its corresponding morphological image (right).  The lower right images provide a gallery view of all captured cells on this slide.  
 

Abstract for Grants

The City of Hope Cytogenetics Core laboratory provides classic and molecular cytogenetics [fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)] services to the City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute scientific investigators. The Cytogenetics Core laboratory equipment, including high-quality fluorescence and light photomicroscopes, three computerized imaging systems, tissue culture facilities, and FISH instrumentation for probe labeling and hybridization, is available to City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute researchers on an appointment basis. The core laboratory also provides training, cell line tumor banking, and consultation services for applied molecular cytogenetic testing.

Contact Us

Joyce Murata Collins, Ph.D.
Director
626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62313
jcollins@coh.org
 
Location
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000

Northwest Building
Room 2265

Phone: 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62025
Fax: 626-301-8877
 

Pricing

Current service offering and pricing can be found on our iLab Solutions site. Please contact us with any questions. 

 

 

Using the Facility

New users of the fluorescent microscope and imaging systems must schedule an introductory training session with Vicki Bedell at 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62025, before using the system. Once trained, researchers may use the system independently.

In order to reserve the facility, City of Hope researchers may schedule microscope use via the online calendaring system in MS Outlook or contact the core facility.Non-City of Hope personnel should contact the core facility. All users should book the facility as far in advance as possible, and must complete and submit the Core Lab Services Request Form . If you have limited needs (e.g., a few photographs), you may request that these be processed by Cytogenetics Core facility personnel.
 
Supplies Needed
Most of the reagents needed are provided by the Cytogenetics Core Laboratory. However, researchers should specify the tissue culture medium required for their cell lines, and any special reagent(s) for their project (e.g., ASI Mouse SKY Probe kit). Users must also complete and submit theCytogenetics Core Lab Service Request Form.
 
Turnaround Time
The turn-around time is highly project-dependent. Please contactJoyce Collins, Ph.D.to discuss the project for estimated turn-around-times.

Cytogenetics Core Laboratory

Cytogenetics Core Laboratory

City of Hope’s Cytogenetics Core Laboratory, supported by the National Cancer Institute-funded Cancer Center Support Grant, provides classic and molecular cytogenetics [fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)] services to Beckman Research Institute researchers, as well as non-City of Hope investigators. FISH testing has proved invaluable as a diagnostic tool in many types of malignancies and is useful in determining both prognosis and course of treatment. The equipment in the Cytogenetics Core Laboratory is available to researchers on an appointment basis. The laboratory also provides training and consultation services in molecular cytogenetic testing.

Services

Services and Equipment

Cytogenetics Core services available include:
  • Cell line characterization and tumor bank storage
  • Solid tumor cytogenetic analysis
  • FISH analysis /FISH enumeration only
  • Genotype-phenotype correlation via immunocytochemistry/FISH analysis
  • Gene mapping
  • Photomicrography Human 24-color karyotyping (SKY)
  • Mouse 20-color karyotyping (SKY)
  • HUMARA clonality assay
  • Human 19K BAC array analysis (DNA to data)
  • Consultation and training services
 
 
Probes Utilized
The Cytogenetics Core Laboratory has experience with all commercially-available probes (e.g., chromosome enumeration probes, painting probes, single copy or locus-specific probes, translocation probes, human and mouse SKY probes, etc.) and nick-translated DNA fragments provided by researchers as “homebrew” probes (nick translocation labeling may be performed by Cytogenetics Core lab personnel). The DNA fragments may be genomic DNA, cDNA or vector DNA; however, due to sensitivity limitations of our current instrumentation, unique sequence probes larger than 2.5 kb are required for mapping studies. If the probe is known to be amplified, probes larger than 1 kb may be used.
 

Equipment
The Cytogenetics Core Laboratory is equipped with high-resolution fluorescent and light photomicroscopes, and three computerized imaging systems (including the SKY Applied Spectral Imaging System and the Bioview System), which are able to capture, process and print microscopic images. Tissue culture facilities and equipment for probe labeling and hybridization are also available.

 

Fluorochromes commonly used with our fluorescent microscopes:
The fluorescent microscopes in the Cytogenetics Core are optimized for observation of the fluorochromes listed below. However, fluorochromes with similar excitation and emission wavelengths as those listed below may also be observed with our systems.

 

 

Fluorochrome                                                   Emission (nm)
FITC or Fluorescein (green)                           520
Texas-red (red)                                                  620
Rhodamine (red)                                              590
DAPI (blue)                                                         452
Spectrum green                                                538
Spectrum red                                                     612
Spectrum orange                                              588
Aqua                                                                    480
 
Applied Spectral Imaging SKY System

 
Bioview System
 
The Bioview Duet capture screen displaying a live fluorescent image (left) with its corresponding morphological image (right).  The lower right images provide a gallery view of all captured cells on this slide.  
 

Abstract for Grants

Abstract for Grants

The City of Hope Cytogenetics Core laboratory provides classic and molecular cytogenetics [fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)] services to the City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute scientific investigators. The Cytogenetics Core laboratory equipment, including high-quality fluorescence and light photomicroscopes, three computerized imaging systems, tissue culture facilities, and FISH instrumentation for probe labeling and hybridization, is available to City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute researchers on an appointment basis. The core laboratory also provides training, cell line tumor banking, and consultation services for applied molecular cytogenetic testing.

Contact Us

Contact Us

Joyce Murata Collins, Ph.D.
Director
626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62313
jcollins@coh.org
 
Location
City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010-3000

Northwest Building
Room 2265

Phone: 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62025
Fax: 626-301-8877
 

Pricing

Pricing

Current service offering and pricing can be found on our iLab Solutions site. Please contact us with any questions. 

 

 

Using the Facility

Using the Facility

New users of the fluorescent microscope and imaging systems must schedule an introductory training session with Vicki Bedell at 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62025, before using the system. Once trained, researchers may use the system independently.

In order to reserve the facility, City of Hope researchers may schedule microscope use via the online calendaring system in MS Outlook or contact the core facility.Non-City of Hope personnel should contact the core facility. All users should book the facility as far in advance as possible, and must complete and submit the Core Lab Services Request Form . If you have limited needs (e.g., a few photographs), you may request that these be processed by Cytogenetics Core facility personnel.
 
Supplies Needed
Most of the reagents needed are provided by the Cytogenetics Core Laboratory. However, researchers should specify the tissue culture medium required for their cell lines, and any special reagent(s) for their project (e.g., ASI Mouse SKY Probe kit). Users must also complete and submit theCytogenetics Core Lab Service Request Form.
 
Turnaround Time
The turn-around time is highly project-dependent. Please contactJoyce Collins, Ph.D.to discuss the project for estimated turn-around-times.
Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
Support Our Research
By giving to City of Hope, you support breakthrough discoveries in laboratory research that translate into lifesaving treatments for patients with cancer and other serious diseases.
 
 
 
 
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