A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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CME e-Learning Bookmark and Share

VTE Prophylaxis

 
Patients with cancer, particularly those undergoing active treatment, frequently experience thromboembolic events. Despite the availability of many guidelines for VTE prophylaxis data demonstrate that there is a discordance between guidelines and practice. In point of fact, VTE is a leading cause of morbidity in patients with cancer.
 
To support our staff in the furtherance of excellent treatment provided by City of Hope, the Department of Continuing Medical Education will release an accredited series of educational interventions the focus of which will be the prevention and decrease of Venous Thromboembolic Events.
 
This series has been made possible by support from the Unihealth Foundation.
 
On the Go
Hear what experts have to say about Venous Thromboembolic Events. The following can be completed in 20 minutes or less.

More Time

Receive Credit
To receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)tm you must:
  1. Register for each individual program
  2. View course materials
  3. Pass each post test with 70% or better
  4. Complete the activity evaluation
If you have any questions regarding credits, please contact the Department of Continuing Medical Education at : 626-256-4673 ext 65622 or cme@coh.org.
 

Improving Immunization Rates Among Adult Oncology Patients

City of Hope has undertaken an Immunization Initiative to help both healthcare providers and patients more aware of the need to be current with immunizations. Many adults assume that immunizations they received as children will protect them for a lifetime. While this is true for some vaccinations, oncologists, primary care physicians, and others who manage patients with cancer need to be aware that some adults have never received certain childhood immunizations and that newer vaccines may not have been available to them as children. Furthermore, immunity conferred by some vaccines fades over time, an effect that may be exacerbated in patients with cancer or who might be otherwise immunocompromised.
 
Questions regarding this project or to learn how to get involved please contact the Continuing Medical Education Department at 626-256-4673 ext 65622 or email us at cme@coh.org.
 
The education and information provided has been developed in collaboration between City of Hope and The France Foundation and sponsored by an educational research grant by Pfizer.

 

Education
 
 
 
Support Materials
 
 
 
 

How the Experts Treat Kidney Cancer

Release date: November 22, 2011
Estimated time to complete activity: 1.25 hours

To obtain CME credit: 
 
  • Complete the evaluation form
  • Submit to CME department via
    • Fax - 626-301-8939 or
    • Email - cme@coh.org or
    • Standard mail - 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Building 94, Duarte, CA 91010
 
  • Questions:626-256-4673, ext. 65622
 
Additional Resources:

Reading List

In the US, renal cell cancer (RCC) accounts for about 3% of all adult cancers. NCI data indicate that an estimated 58,000 new cases of kidney cancer were diagnosed in 2010, and approximately 13,000 Americans died of the disease. Surgery to remove the affected kidney is the most common initial treatment for all stages of kidney cancer. However, regionally advanced or metastatic cases account for approximately half of all new cases. Historically survival rates for these patient populations have been about 20%. This poor prognosis combined with modest efficacy and high toxicity associated with currently available therapies for RCC has necessitated and resulted in the development of newer targeted therapies in order to improve outcome in these patient groups. This activity has been designed to provide the health care professional with the most current clinical and investigative data pertaining to new less invasive surgical techniques for the primary management of RCC and the expanding role of emerging multi-targeted therapies for patients with regionally advanced or metastatic RCC.

Upon successful completion of this activity, the learner should be better able to:
  • Review "traditional" and less invasive surgical techniques for the management of kidney cancer
  • Examine how new multi-targeted therapies beneficially impact the management of metastatic kidney cancer
  • Discuss current therapeutic approaches to the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer
  • Describe the multidisciplinary treatment paradigm for the treatment of kidney cancer

 

This activity has been designed to meet the needs of medical oncologists, urologists, internists and allied health care providers who treat patients with kidney cancer.
 

City of Hope is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


The following may apply CME Category 1 credit for license renewal:
 
  • Registered Nurses: Nurses may report up to 1.25 credit hours toward the continuing education requirements for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of a BRN provider number.
  • Physician’s Assistants:The National Commission on certification of Physicians Assistants states that AMA accredited Category 1 courses are acceptable fro CME requirements for recertification.
  •  
  • To receive CME credit, it is necessary to complete the post test & evaluation form. For more information,please click here.
  •  
  • City of Hope has implemented policies and procedures to be in strict compliance with current ACCME Standards of Commercial Support requiring disclosure and resolution conflicts of interest.

 

Faculty Disclosure:
As part of these new commercial guidelines, we are required to disclose if Faculty , Presenters, Authors, Planners, CME Committee Members, Course Directors and / or Moderators have any real or apparent vested commercial interest(s) in both those companies whose products may be discussed/described during the course of the activity and in those companies who may be acting as commercial supporters of the activity.

Disclosure of Off-Label Use:
This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not approved/indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

 
 

CME e-Learning

VTE Prophylaxis

VTE Prophylaxis

 
Patients with cancer, particularly those undergoing active treatment, frequently experience thromboembolic events. Despite the availability of many guidelines for VTE prophylaxis data demonstrate that there is a discordance between guidelines and practice. In point of fact, VTE is a leading cause of morbidity in patients with cancer.
 
To support our staff in the furtherance of excellent treatment provided by City of Hope, the Department of Continuing Medical Education will release an accredited series of educational interventions the focus of which will be the prevention and decrease of Venous Thromboembolic Events.
 
This series has been made possible by support from the Unihealth Foundation.
 
On the Go
Hear what experts have to say about Venous Thromboembolic Events. The following can be completed in 20 minutes or less.

More Time

Receive Credit
To receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)tm you must:
  1. Register for each individual program
  2. View course materials
  3. Pass each post test with 70% or better
  4. Complete the activity evaluation
If you have any questions regarding credits, please contact the Department of Continuing Medical Education at : 626-256-4673 ext 65622 or cme@coh.org.
 

Immunization Initiative

Improving Immunization Rates Among Adult Oncology Patients

City of Hope has undertaken an Immunization Initiative to help both healthcare providers and patients more aware of the need to be current with immunizations. Many adults assume that immunizations they received as children will protect them for a lifetime. While this is true for some vaccinations, oncologists, primary care physicians, and others who manage patients with cancer need to be aware that some adults have never received certain childhood immunizations and that newer vaccines may not have been available to them as children. Furthermore, immunity conferred by some vaccines fades over time, an effect that may be exacerbated in patients with cancer or who might be otherwise immunocompromised.
 
Questions regarding this project or to learn how to get involved please contact the Continuing Medical Education Department at 626-256-4673 ext 65622 or email us at cme@coh.org.
 
The education and information provided has been developed in collaboration between City of Hope and The France Foundation and sponsored by an educational research grant by Pfizer.

 

Education
 
 
 
Support Materials
 
 
 
 

How the Experts Treat Kidney Cancer

How the Experts Treat Kidney Cancer

Release date: November 22, 2011
Estimated time to complete activity: 1.25 hours

To obtain CME credit: 
 
  • Complete the evaluation form
  • Submit to CME department via
    • Fax - 626-301-8939 or
    • Email - cme@coh.org or
    • Standard mail - 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Building 94, Duarte, CA 91010
 
  • Questions:626-256-4673, ext. 65622
 
Additional Resources:

Reading List

In the US, renal cell cancer (RCC) accounts for about 3% of all adult cancers. NCI data indicate that an estimated 58,000 new cases of kidney cancer were diagnosed in 2010, and approximately 13,000 Americans died of the disease. Surgery to remove the affected kidney is the most common initial treatment for all stages of kidney cancer. However, regionally advanced or metastatic cases account for approximately half of all new cases. Historically survival rates for these patient populations have been about 20%. This poor prognosis combined with modest efficacy and high toxicity associated with currently available therapies for RCC has necessitated and resulted in the development of newer targeted therapies in order to improve outcome in these patient groups. This activity has been designed to provide the health care professional with the most current clinical and investigative data pertaining to new less invasive surgical techniques for the primary management of RCC and the expanding role of emerging multi-targeted therapies for patients with regionally advanced or metastatic RCC.

Upon successful completion of this activity, the learner should be better able to:
  • Review "traditional" and less invasive surgical techniques for the management of kidney cancer
  • Examine how new multi-targeted therapies beneficially impact the management of metastatic kidney cancer
  • Discuss current therapeutic approaches to the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer
  • Describe the multidisciplinary treatment paradigm for the treatment of kidney cancer

 

This activity has been designed to meet the needs of medical oncologists, urologists, internists and allied health care providers who treat patients with kidney cancer.
 

City of Hope is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


The following may apply CME Category 1 credit for license renewal:
 
  • Registered Nurses: Nurses may report up to 1.25 credit hours toward the continuing education requirements for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of a BRN provider number.
  • Physician’s Assistants:The National Commission on certification of Physicians Assistants states that AMA accredited Category 1 courses are acceptable fro CME requirements for recertification.
  •  
  • To receive CME credit, it is necessary to complete the post test & evaluation form. For more information,please click here.
  •  
  • City of Hope has implemented policies and procedures to be in strict compliance with current ACCME Standards of Commercial Support requiring disclosure and resolution conflicts of interest.

 

Faculty Disclosure:
As part of these new commercial guidelines, we are required to disclose if Faculty , Presenters, Authors, Planners, CME Committee Members, Course Directors and / or Moderators have any real or apparent vested commercial interest(s) in both those companies whose products may be discussed/described during the course of the activity and in those companies who may be acting as commercial supporters of the activity.

Disclosure of Off-Label Use:
This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not approved/indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

 
 
Education and Training
As one of only a select few National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, City of Hope integrates all aspects of cancer research, treatment and education. We offer a range of programs serving students, post-doctoral trainees, health and medical professionals.

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Local and national conferences, in-depth educational training and a certification program provide both current and aspiring health professionals opportunities to further their knowledge in their fields of interest.
 
 
City of Hope offers a range of programs and services, such as Graduate Medical Education & Clinical Training, that serve students, post-doctoral trainees, medical professionals and staff.
The goal of the Postdoctoral Training Office is to ensure the postdoctoral experience at City of Hope is rewarding and meaningful to all participants.
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