A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Center for Cancer Survivorship

 
Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   
Eligibility Criteria for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program
 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team

Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Center for Cancer Survivorship

Center for Cancer Survivorship

 
Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   
Eligibility Criteria for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program
 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team

Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.
Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Brochure

The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program is a special program for patients who have completed treatment for cancer.
 
Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer Infantil

 


El Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer
Infantil es un programa especial para los
pacientes que hayan finalizado su tratamiento
para el cáncer.

 

Información en español


Para más información o para programar una cita, llame al 626-471-9220 o envíe un correo electrónico a survivorship@coh.org.

Population Sciences
The mission of the Department of Population Sciences is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all populations, through collaborative multidisciplinary programs in clinical service, research and education.
 
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
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  • Gliomas, a type of tumor that grows in the brain, are very difficult to treat successfully due to their complex nature. That might not always be the case. First some background: The most aggressive and common type of primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. Although the brain tumor mass can often be remov...
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin. The result is rashes and, sometimes, tumors, which can be mistaken for other dermatological conditions. In a smal...
  • Weighing your breast cancer risk? One study suggests a measure to consider is skirt size. A British study suggests that for each increase in skirt size every 10 years after age 25, the five-year risk of developing breast cancer postmenopause increases from one in 61 to one in 51 – a 77 percent increase in risk....
  • Runners prize medals for 5Ks and marathons. Becky Stokes has a medal she cherishes from a very different kind of race: the marathon of treatments necessary to beat her aggressive triple-negative breast cancer. Just a week ago, she completed her last radiation treatment, and danced in the hospital with the staff...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. Darakjian’s s...
  • The environment plays a role in causing cancer – this much we know. But scientists are still trying to understand what that role is, what environmental factors are in play and how precisely those factors are linked to cancer. Now City of Hope researchers have unlocked a clue as to how one carcinogen triggers ca...
  • Jonathan Yamzon, M.D., assistant clinical professor of surgery in the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology, explains his approach to what’s known as “active surveillance” of men with prostate cancer. Patients need to be educated about their treatment options, he writes. Active surveillanc...
  • For most prostate cancer patients, surgery or radiation therapy is the initial and primary treatment against the disease. But some patients can benefit from chemotherapy and hormone therapy too, especially if there are signs of a relapse or if the cancer has spread beyond the prostate gland. Here, Cy Stein, M.D...
  • Cancer research has yielded scientific breakthroughs that offer patients more options, more hope for survival and a higher quality of life than ever before. The 14.5 million cancer patients living in the United States are living proof that cancer research saves lives. Now, in addition to the clinic, hospital an...
  • Advances in cancer treatment, built on discoveries made in the laboratory then brought to the bedside, have phenomenally changed the reality of living with a cancer diagnosis. More than any other time in history, people diagnosed with cancer are more likely to survive and to enjoy a high quality of life. Howeve...
  • While health care reform has led to an increase in the number of people signing up for health insurance, many people remain uninsured or are not taking full advantage of the health benefits they now have. Still others are finding that, although their premiums are affordable, they aren’t able to see the do...
  • Kidney cancer rates and thyroid cancer rates in adults have continued to rise year after year. Now a new study has found that incidence rates for these cancers are also increasing in children — particularly in African-American children. The study, published online this month in Pediatrics, examined childhood ca...
  • Thyroid cancer has become one of the fastest-growing cancers in the United States for both men and women. The chance of being diagnosed with the cancer has nearly doubled since 1990. This year an estimated 63,000 people will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer in the United States and nearly 1,900 people will die ...
  • Older teenagers and young adults traditionally face worse outcomes than younger children when diagnosed with brain cancer and other central nervous system tumors. A first-of-its-kind study shows why. A team of researchers from the departments of Population Sciences and Pathology at City of Hope recently examine...