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CCARE In The News

Time Warner Cable: Health and Cancer Prevention in the Community
Mayra Serrano with the City of Hope, talks to Time Warner Cable Local Edition, Brad Pomerance, about spreading the word about health and preventing cancer within the community.
 
 
 
 
CCN: The Dangers of Colorectal Cancer
Dr. Kimlin Ashing discusses the deadly impact of colorectal cancer.
 
 
 
 
CCN: Colon Cancer as a Preventable Disease
Dr. Kimlin Ashing from City of Hope talks about the preventable disease of colon cancer.
 
 
 
Breakthroughs: Cancer Health Disparities by the Numbers
“The causes of cancer health disparities are complex, with root causes stemming from genetic susceptibility, stress and immune function, and family history, as well as health care system factors including preventive care access and utilization, quality care, and diagnostic and therapeutic care delay,” said Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D., director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE) at City of Hope. Read full article here.
 
Dr. Kimlin Ashing Named in "2014 Women of the Year"
Rep. Grace F. Napolitano honored 24 women who had been nominated by volunteer organizations for exemplary service at the 2014 “Women of the Year” ceremony at the Azusa Woman’s Club in Azusa. “The general public does not realize the importance of volunteering in churches, civic organizations, and nonprofits that these women bring to their communities,” Napolitano said. “The efforts these women have made, which have taken them away from their families, are to be commended and celebrated. Our attempt to recognize a few of these women whose unselfish acts impact so many is symbolic of the countless unsung heroines who make a difference in so many lives. We thank them and their families, and we congratulate them on their achievements.” Read full article here.
 
KCAL9: Program Educates African-American Women on Cancer
A campaign is underway at City of Hope hospital in Duarte to educate African-American women about the risks of breast cancer. KCAL9’s Melanie Woodrow reports the Patient Navigator program offers support for survivors and raises awareness for those at risk. "Behavioral scientist Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, the driving force behind the program, said black women often get lost in the follow-up phase of treatment..." Watch interview here.
 
School Children Help Raise Funds for Breast Cancer
St. Margaret Mary School in Chino celebrated their annual "Pink Day" on Friday, October 25.  The children donated a dollar for the City of Hope and wore pink shirts to school.  They honored all those they know who have battled breast cancer by writing their names on a large poster and took a picture of the entire school body in the shape of a giant pink ribbon (picture above).  Mayra Serrano, Community Interventionist from City of Hope's Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), spoke with the students in the afternoon to educate them on breast cancer and about how their donations will be used.  They ended the day with a fundraiser of pink snow cones.  All donations and proceeds totaled $408 and were sent to the City of Hope to help end the battle of breast cancer.
 
American Psychological Association: Life-Changing Interventions
Psychologists’ research is preventing and reducing the burden of cancer; Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing weighs in. Download the article here .
 
San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Senator Ed Hernandez Recognizes Women of Achievement
"Assemblyman Dr. Ed Hernandez [...] honored ten women who live and/or work within the district in commemoration of Women's History Month. Honorees were selected based on nominations submitted by people from their communities." Download the rest of the article  here .
 
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism: Leveling the Playing Field in Cancer Care
"Those who survive cancer run a life-changing gauntlet [...]. Many of the aftereffects can be avoided through long-term care, but those programs are often inaccessible to the poor, particularly ethnic minorities..." Download the rest of the article here
 
Latino USA: The Psychology of Breast Cancer in Latinas
Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Ashing at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery. Click here for the article or here for only the audio.
 
Los Angeles Times: Why Breast Cancer is More Likely to Kill Black Women
This article explores why black women on Medicare fare worse after breast cancer diagnoses than similar white women, a study finds. Researchers blame preexisting health issues such as diabetes. Dr. Ashing weighs in on this relevant topic. Click here to read the full article.
 
The ASCO Post: Young Women and Breast Cancer
Investigators at City of Hope take a closer look at the rise in young minority women with breast cancer. Dr. Ashing and Monica Rosales share about exciting new studies. Click here to read the full article.
 
CCARE Encourages Cervical Exams Among At-Risk Women in Inland Empire
Studies show minority women in southern California remain at a high risk for cervical cancer. And although routine screenings make this cancer easily preventable, far too few women avail themselves of these medical services. CCARE embarked on a clinical trial to address this issue.
 
Minority Nurse: Addressing Disparities in Cancer Treatment
Dr. Ashing discusses the role of minority nurses in working to reduce cancer disparities in their community, and discusses optimal prevention strategies for women everywhere. Click here to read the full article.
 
 
 
 
 

In The News

CCARE In The News

Time Warner Cable: Health and Cancer Prevention in the Community
Mayra Serrano with the City of Hope, talks to Time Warner Cable Local Edition, Brad Pomerance, about spreading the word about health and preventing cancer within the community.
 
 
 
 
CCN: The Dangers of Colorectal Cancer
Dr. Kimlin Ashing discusses the deadly impact of colorectal cancer.
 
 
 
 
CCN: Colon Cancer as a Preventable Disease
Dr. Kimlin Ashing from City of Hope talks about the preventable disease of colon cancer.
 
 
 
Breakthroughs: Cancer Health Disparities by the Numbers
“The causes of cancer health disparities are complex, with root causes stemming from genetic susceptibility, stress and immune function, and family history, as well as health care system factors including preventive care access and utilization, quality care, and diagnostic and therapeutic care delay,” said Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D., director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE) at City of Hope. Read full article here.
 
Dr. Kimlin Ashing Named in "2014 Women of the Year"
Rep. Grace F. Napolitano honored 24 women who had been nominated by volunteer organizations for exemplary service at the 2014 “Women of the Year” ceremony at the Azusa Woman’s Club in Azusa. “The general public does not realize the importance of volunteering in churches, civic organizations, and nonprofits that these women bring to their communities,” Napolitano said. “The efforts these women have made, which have taken them away from their families, are to be commended and celebrated. Our attempt to recognize a few of these women whose unselfish acts impact so many is symbolic of the countless unsung heroines who make a difference in so many lives. We thank them and their families, and we congratulate them on their achievements.” Read full article here.
 
KCAL9: Program Educates African-American Women on Cancer
A campaign is underway at City of Hope hospital in Duarte to educate African-American women about the risks of breast cancer. KCAL9’s Melanie Woodrow reports the Patient Navigator program offers support for survivors and raises awareness for those at risk. "Behavioral scientist Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, the driving force behind the program, said black women often get lost in the follow-up phase of treatment..." Watch interview here.
 
School Children Help Raise Funds for Breast Cancer
St. Margaret Mary School in Chino celebrated their annual "Pink Day" on Friday, October 25.  The children donated a dollar for the City of Hope and wore pink shirts to school.  They honored all those they know who have battled breast cancer by writing their names on a large poster and took a picture of the entire school body in the shape of a giant pink ribbon (picture above).  Mayra Serrano, Community Interventionist from City of Hope's Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), spoke with the students in the afternoon to educate them on breast cancer and about how their donations will be used.  They ended the day with a fundraiser of pink snow cones.  All donations and proceeds totaled $408 and were sent to the City of Hope to help end the battle of breast cancer.
 
American Psychological Association: Life-Changing Interventions
Psychologists’ research is preventing and reducing the burden of cancer; Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing weighs in. Download the article here .
 
San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Senator Ed Hernandez Recognizes Women of Achievement
"Assemblyman Dr. Ed Hernandez [...] honored ten women who live and/or work within the district in commemoration of Women's History Month. Honorees were selected based on nominations submitted by people from their communities." Download the rest of the article  here .
 
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism: Leveling the Playing Field in Cancer Care
"Those who survive cancer run a life-changing gauntlet [...]. Many of the aftereffects can be avoided through long-term care, but those programs are often inaccessible to the poor, particularly ethnic minorities..." Download the rest of the article here
 
Latino USA: The Psychology of Breast Cancer in Latinas
Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Ashing at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery. Click here for the article or here for only the audio.
 
Los Angeles Times: Why Breast Cancer is More Likely to Kill Black Women
This article explores why black women on Medicare fare worse after breast cancer diagnoses than similar white women, a study finds. Researchers blame preexisting health issues such as diabetes. Dr. Ashing weighs in on this relevant topic. Click here to read the full article.
 
The ASCO Post: Young Women and Breast Cancer
Investigators at City of Hope take a closer look at the rise in young minority women with breast cancer. Dr. Ashing and Monica Rosales share about exciting new studies. Click here to read the full article.
 
CCARE Encourages Cervical Exams Among At-Risk Women in Inland Empire
Studies show minority women in southern California remain at a high risk for cervical cancer. And although routine screenings make this cancer easily preventable, far too few women avail themselves of these medical services. CCARE embarked on a clinical trial to address this issue.
 
Minority Nurse: Addressing Disparities in Cancer Treatment
Dr. Ashing discusses the role of minority nurses in working to reduce cancer disparities in their community, and discusses optimal prevention strategies for women everywhere. Click here to read the full article.
 
 
 
 
 
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Joselyn Miller received a lifesaving bone marrow transplant at City of Hope two years ago. Here, she reflects on her gratitude as a bone marrow recipient and on giving back. By Joselyn Miller thank•ful adjective  \ˈthaŋk-fəl\ :  conscious of benefit received :  glad that something has happened or not happened, ...
  • When it comes to cancer, your family history may provide more questions than answers: How do my genes increase my risk for cancer? No one in my family has had cancer; does that mean I won’t get cancer? What cancers are common in certain populations and ethnicities? City of Hope experts have some guidance. “Your...
  • The body’s immune system is usually adept at attacking outside invaders such as bacteria and viruses. But because cancer originates from the body’s own cells, the immune system can fail to see it as foreign. As a result, the body’s most powerful ally can remain largely idle against cancer as the disease progres...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, five City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Her...
  • Are you thinking about switching from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes for the Great American Smokeout? Are you thinking that might be a better option than the traditional quit-smoking route? Think again. For lung expert Brian Tiep, M.D., the dislike and distrust he feels for e-cigs comes down to this: Th...
  • Hematologist Robert Chen, M.D., is boosting scientific discovery at City of Hope and, by extension, across the nation. Just ask the National Cancer Institute. The institution recently awarded Chen the much-sought-after Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award for boosting scientific discovery at City of Hope...
  • Great strides have been made in treating cancer – including lung cancer – but by the time people show symptoms of the disease, the cancer has usually advanced. That’s because, at early stages, lung cancer has no symptoms. Only recently has lung cancer screening become an option. (Read more about the risks...
  • Identifying cures for currently incurable diseases and providing patients with safe, fast and potentially lifesaving treatments is the focus of City of Hope’s new Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT-I). The clinic is funded by an $8 million, five-year grant from the California Institute for Regene...
  • Cancer is a couple’s disease. It affects not just the person diagnosed, but his or her partner as well. It also affects the ability of both people to communicate effectively. The Couples Coping with Cancer Together program at City of Hope teaches couples how to communicate and solve problems as a unit. He...
  • Chemotherapy drugs work by either killing cancer cells or by stopping them from multiplying, that is, dividing. Some of the more powerful drugs used to treat cancer do their job by interfering with the cancer cells’ DNA and RNA growth, preventing them from copying themselves and dividing. Such drugs, however, l...
  • During October, everything seems to turn pink – clothing, the NFL logo, tape dispensers, boxing gloves, blenders, soup cans, you name it – in order to raise awareness for what many believe is the most dangerous cancer that affects women: breast cancer. But, in addition to thinking pink, women should...
  • In February 2003, when she was only 16 months old, Maya Gallardo was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and, to make matters much worse, pneumonia. The pneumonia complicated what was already destined to be grueling treatment regimen. To assess the extent of her illness, Maya had to endure a spinal ...
  • Former smokers age 55 to 74 who rely on Medicare for health care services have just received a long-hoped-for announcement. Under a proposed decision from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, they’ll now have access to lung cancer screening with a low-dose CT scan. The proposed decision, announ...
  • City of Hope has a longstanding commitment to combating diabetes, a leading national and global health threat. Already, it’s scored some successes, from research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin – still used by millions of patients – to potentially lifesaving islet cell transplants. Diabet...
  • Dee Hunt never smoked. Neither did her five sisters and brothers. They didn’t have exposure to radon or asbestos, either. That didn’t prevent every one of them from being diagnosed with lung cancer. Their parents were smokers, but they’d all left home more than 30 years before any of them were diagn...