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CCARE In The News

Time Warner Cable: Health and Cancer Prevention in the Community
Mayra Serrano with the City of Hope, talks to Time Warner Cable Local Edition, Brad Pomerance, about spreading the word about health and preventing cancer within the community.
 
 
 
 
CCN: The Dangers of Colorectal Cancer
Dr. Kimlin Ashing discusses the deadly impact of colorectal cancer.
 
 
 
 
CCN: Colon Cancer as a Preventable Disease
Dr. Kimlin Ashing from City of Hope talks about the preventable disease of colon cancer.
 
 
 
Breakthroughs: Cancer Health Disparities by the Numbers
“The causes of cancer health disparities are complex, with root causes stemming from genetic susceptibility, stress and immune function, and family history, as well as health care system factors including preventive care access and utilization, quality care, and diagnostic and therapeutic care delay,” said Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D., director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE) at City of Hope. Read full article here.
 
Dr. Kimlin Ashing Named in "2014 Women of the Year"
Rep. Grace F. Napolitano honored 24 women who had been nominated by volunteer organizations for exemplary service at the 2014 “Women of the Year” ceremony at the Azusa Woman’s Club in Azusa. “The general public does not realize the importance of volunteering in churches, civic organizations, and nonprofits that these women bring to their communities,” Napolitano said. “The efforts these women have made, which have taken them away from their families, are to be commended and celebrated. Our attempt to recognize a few of these women whose unselfish acts impact so many is symbolic of the countless unsung heroines who make a difference in so many lives. We thank them and their families, and we congratulate them on their achievements.” Read full article here.
 
KCAL9: Program Educates African-American Women on Cancer
A campaign is underway at City of Hope hospital in Duarte to educate African-American women about the risks of breast cancer. KCAL9’s Melanie Woodrow reports the Patient Navigator program offers support for survivors and raises awareness for those at risk. "Behavioral scientist Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, the driving force behind the program, said black women often get lost in the follow-up phase of treatment..." Watch interview here.
 
School Children Help Raise Funds for Breast Cancer
St. Margaret Mary School in Chino celebrated their annual "Pink Day" on Friday, October 25.  The children donated a dollar for the City of Hope and wore pink shirts to school.  They honored all those they know who have battled breast cancer by writing their names on a large poster and took a picture of the entire school body in the shape of a giant pink ribbon (picture above).  Mayra Serrano, Community Interventionist from City of Hope's Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), spoke with the students in the afternoon to educate them on breast cancer and about how their donations will be used.  They ended the day with a fundraiser of pink snow cones.  All donations and proceeds totaled $408 and were sent to the City of Hope to help end the battle of breast cancer.
 
American Psychological Association: Life-Changing Interventions
Psychologists’ research is preventing and reducing the burden of cancer; Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing weighs in. Download the article here .
 
San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Senator Ed Hernandez Recognizes Women of Achievement
"Assemblyman Dr. Ed Hernandez [...] honored ten women who live and/or work within the district in commemoration of Women's History Month. Honorees were selected based on nominations submitted by people from their communities." Download the rest of the article  here .
 
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism: Leveling the Playing Field in Cancer Care
"Those who survive cancer run a life-changing gauntlet [...]. Many of the aftereffects can be avoided through long-term care, but those programs are often inaccessible to the poor, particularly ethnic minorities..." Download the rest of the article here
 
Latino USA: The Psychology of Breast Cancer in Latinas
Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Ashing at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery. Click here for the article or here for only the audio.
 
Los Angeles Times: Why Breast Cancer is More Likely to Kill Black Women
This article explores why black women on Medicare fare worse after breast cancer diagnoses than similar white women, a study finds. Researchers blame preexisting health issues such as diabetes. Dr. Ashing weighs in on this relevant topic. Click here to read the full article.
 
The ASCO Post: Young Women and Breast Cancer
Investigators at City of Hope take a closer look at the rise in young minority women with breast cancer. Dr. Ashing and Monica Rosales share about exciting new studies. Click here to read the full article.
 
CCARE Encourages Cervical Exams Among At-Risk Women in Inland Empire
Studies show minority women in southern California remain at a high risk for cervical cancer. And although routine screenings make this cancer easily preventable, far too few women avail themselves of these medical services. CCARE embarked on a clinical trial to address this issue.
 
Minority Nurse: Addressing Disparities in Cancer Treatment
Dr. Ashing discusses the role of minority nurses in working to reduce cancer disparities in their community, and discusses optimal prevention strategies for women everywhere. Click here to read the full article.
 
 
 
 
 

In The News

CCARE In The News

Time Warner Cable: Health and Cancer Prevention in the Community
Mayra Serrano with the City of Hope, talks to Time Warner Cable Local Edition, Brad Pomerance, about spreading the word about health and preventing cancer within the community.
 
 
 
 
CCN: The Dangers of Colorectal Cancer
Dr. Kimlin Ashing discusses the deadly impact of colorectal cancer.
 
 
 
 
CCN: Colon Cancer as a Preventable Disease
Dr. Kimlin Ashing from City of Hope talks about the preventable disease of colon cancer.
 
 
 
Breakthroughs: Cancer Health Disparities by the Numbers
“The causes of cancer health disparities are complex, with root causes stemming from genetic susceptibility, stress and immune function, and family history, as well as health care system factors including preventive care access and utilization, quality care, and diagnostic and therapeutic care delay,” said Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D., director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE) at City of Hope. Read full article here.
 
Dr. Kimlin Ashing Named in "2014 Women of the Year"
Rep. Grace F. Napolitano honored 24 women who had been nominated by volunteer organizations for exemplary service at the 2014 “Women of the Year” ceremony at the Azusa Woman’s Club in Azusa. “The general public does not realize the importance of volunteering in churches, civic organizations, and nonprofits that these women bring to their communities,” Napolitano said. “The efforts these women have made, which have taken them away from their families, are to be commended and celebrated. Our attempt to recognize a few of these women whose unselfish acts impact so many is symbolic of the countless unsung heroines who make a difference in so many lives. We thank them and their families, and we congratulate them on their achievements.” Read full article here.
 
KCAL9: Program Educates African-American Women on Cancer
A campaign is underway at City of Hope hospital in Duarte to educate African-American women about the risks of breast cancer. KCAL9’s Melanie Woodrow reports the Patient Navigator program offers support for survivors and raises awareness for those at risk. "Behavioral scientist Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, the driving force behind the program, said black women often get lost in the follow-up phase of treatment..." Watch interview here.
 
School Children Help Raise Funds for Breast Cancer
St. Margaret Mary School in Chino celebrated their annual "Pink Day" on Friday, October 25.  The children donated a dollar for the City of Hope and wore pink shirts to school.  They honored all those they know who have battled breast cancer by writing their names on a large poster and took a picture of the entire school body in the shape of a giant pink ribbon (picture above).  Mayra Serrano, Community Interventionist from City of Hope's Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), spoke with the students in the afternoon to educate them on breast cancer and about how their donations will be used.  They ended the day with a fundraiser of pink snow cones.  All donations and proceeds totaled $408 and were sent to the City of Hope to help end the battle of breast cancer.
 
American Psychological Association: Life-Changing Interventions
Psychologists’ research is preventing and reducing the burden of cancer; Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing weighs in. Download the article here .
 
San Gabriel Valley Tribune: Senator Ed Hernandez Recognizes Women of Achievement
"Assemblyman Dr. Ed Hernandez [...] honored ten women who live and/or work within the district in commemoration of Women's History Month. Honorees were selected based on nominations submitted by people from their communities." Download the rest of the article  here .
 
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism: Leveling the Playing Field in Cancer Care
"Those who survive cancer run a life-changing gauntlet [...]. Many of the aftereffects can be avoided through long-term care, but those programs are often inaccessible to the poor, particularly ethnic minorities..." Download the rest of the article here
 
Latino USA: The Psychology of Breast Cancer in Latinas
Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Ashing at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery. Click here for the article or here for only the audio.
 
Los Angeles Times: Why Breast Cancer is More Likely to Kill Black Women
This article explores why black women on Medicare fare worse after breast cancer diagnoses than similar white women, a study finds. Researchers blame preexisting health issues such as diabetes. Dr. Ashing weighs in on this relevant topic. Click here to read the full article.
 
The ASCO Post: Young Women and Breast Cancer
Investigators at City of Hope take a closer look at the rise in young minority women with breast cancer. Dr. Ashing and Monica Rosales share about exciting new studies. Click here to read the full article.
 
CCARE Encourages Cervical Exams Among At-Risk Women in Inland Empire
Studies show minority women in southern California remain at a high risk for cervical cancer. And although routine screenings make this cancer easily preventable, far too few women avail themselves of these medical services. CCARE embarked on a clinical trial to address this issue.
 
Minority Nurse: Addressing Disparities in Cancer Treatment
Dr. Ashing discusses the role of minority nurses in working to reduce cancer disparities in their community, and discusses optimal prevention strategies for women everywhere. Click here to read the full article.
 
 
 
 
 
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • We’ve seen it in science fiction: The aliens begin terra-forming a planet to create a friendly habitat that gives them, not the inhabitants, all the advantages when the colonization begins. Turns out, cancer does essentially the same thing when it metastasizes, according to new research from City of Hope. The f...
  • Equipping the immune system to fight cancer – a disease that thrives on mutations and circumventing the body’s natural defenses – is within reach. In fact, City of Hope researchers are testing one approach in clinical trials now. Scientists take a number of steps to turn cancer patients’ T cells – white b...
  • As treatments for lung cancer become more targeted and effective, the need for better technology to detect lung cancer mutations becomes increasingly important. A new clinical study at City of Hope is examining the feasibility of using blood and urine tests to detect lung cancer mutations, potentially allowing ...
  • When it comes to breast cancer risk, insulin levels may matter more than weight, new research has found. The study from Imperial College London School of Public Health, published in the journal Cancer Research, indicates that metabolic health – not a person’s weight or body mass index – increases breast cancer ...
  • No one ever plans to have cancer – and there’s never a good time. For Homa Sadat, her cancer came at a particularly bad time: just one year after losing her father to the pancreatic cancer he had battled for two years. She was working a grueling schedule managing three commercial office buildings. She’d just [&...
  • Patients at City of Hope – most of whom are fighting cancer – rely on more than 37,000 units of blood and platelets each year for their treatment and survival. Every one of those units comes from family, friends or someone who traded an hour or so of their time and a pint of their […]
  • Surgery is vital in the treatment of cancer – it’s used to help diagnose, treat and even prevent the disease – so a new colorectal cancer study linking a decrease in surgeries for advanced cancer to increased survival rates may raise more questions than it answers for some patients. The surgery-and-surviv...
  • Age is the single greatest risk factor overall for cancer; our chances of developing the disease rise steeply after age 50. For geriatric oncology nurse Peggy Burhenn, the meaning is clear: Cancer is primarily a geriatric condition. That’s why she is forging inroads in the care of older adults with cancer. Burh...
  • One of American’s great sportscasters, Stuart Scott, passed away from recurrent cancer of the appendix at the young age of 49. His cancer was diagnosed when he was only 40 years old. It was found during an operation for appendicitis. His courageous fight against this disease began in 2007, resumed again with an...
  • When Homa Sadat found a lump in her breast at age 27, her gynecologist told her what many doctors say to young women: You’re too young to have breast cancer. With the lump dismissed as a harmless cyst, she didn’t think about it again until she was at a restaurant six months later and felt […]
  • What most people call a “bone marrow transplant” is not actually a transplant of bone marrow; it is instead the transplantation of what’s known as hematopoietic stem cells. Such cells are often taken from bone marrow, but not always. Hematopoietic stem cells are simply immature cells that can ...
  • Doctors have long known that women with a precancerous condition called atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of breast cancer. Now a new study has found that the risk is more serious than previously thought. Hyperplasia itself is an overgrowth of cells; atypical hyperplasia is an overgrowth in a distorted...
  • Don’t kid yourself. Just because it’s mid-January doesn’t mean it’s too late to make resolutions for a happier, and healthier, 2015. Just consider them resolutions that are more mature than those giddy, sometimes self-deluded, Jan. 1 resolutions. To that end, we share some advice from Cary A. Presant, M.D., an ...
  • Sales and marketing executive Jim Murphy first came to City of Hope in 2002 to donate blood for a friend who was being treated for esophageal cancer. The disease is serious. Although esophageal cancer accounts for only about 1 percent of cancer diagnoses in the U.S., only about 20 percent of patients survive at...
  • Aaron Bomar and his family were celebrating his daughter’s 33rd birthday in September 2014 when he received alarming news: According to an X-ray taken earlier that day at an urgent care facility, he had a node on his aorta and was in danger of an aneurysm. Bomar held hands with his wife and daughter and s...