A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Who We Are Bookmark and Share

Who We Are

City of Hope is dedicated to making a difference in the lives of people with cancer, diabetes and other serious illnesses. Our mission is to transform the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit, hope into reality. We accomplish this by providing outstanding care, conducting innovative research and offering vital education programs focused on eliminating these diseases.
 
Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 41 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute. Our role as leaders in patient care, basic and clinical research, and the translation of science into tangible benefit is widely acknowledged.
 
Our community includes research associates, scientists, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, graduate students, fundraising specialists, marketing professionals, volunteers and an extensive support staff. We are united by our desire to find cures, save lives and transform the future of health. Every discovery we make and every new treatment we create gives people the chance to live longer, better and more fully.
 
City of Hope continues to be a pioneer of patient centered care and remains committed to its tradition of exceptional care for patients, families and communities. Each day, we live out our credo:
 
"There is no profit in curing the body, if, in the process, we destroy the soul."
 

The City of Hope Story

The City of Hope story began in 1913, when a group of volunteers, spurred by compassion to help those afflicted with tuberculosis, established the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association (JCRA) and raised money to start a free, nonsectarian tuberculosis sanatorium.
 
After several fundraisers, the JCRA put a down payment on 10 acres of sun-soaked land in Duarte, where they would establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium a year later. The original sanatorium consisted of two canvas cottages. So was launched a century-long journey that would place City of Hope at the forefront of the nation’s leading medical and research institutions. 
 
By the mid-1940s, thanks to the discovery of antibiotics, tuberculosis was on the decline in the U.S. However, City of Hope rose to the next medical challenge, tackling the catastrophic disease of cancer — and later on, diabetes and HIV/AIDS — while reaffirming its humanitarian vision that “health is a human right.”

In the spirit of that vision, Samuel H. Golter, one of City of Hope’s early leaders, coined the phrase, “There is no profit in curing the body if, in the process, we destroy the soul.” Those words became City of Hope’s credo.
 
Over the decades, research conducted at City of Hope has led to significant advances in modern medicine, including the development of the first synthetic human insulin, human growth hormone and the technology behind the widely used cancer-fighting drugs Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.
 
Today, City of Hope has been designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest recognition bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, and is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, with research and treatment protocols that advance care throughout the nation.
 
As we look toward the next 100 years, we continue our mission and commitment to transform the future of medicine. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for countless patients and their loved ones.
 
And our work is just beginning.
 
Historical Milestones
 
1913
The Jewish Consumptive Relief Association was officially incorporated. 10 acres of land were purchased to establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium.

1914
The sanatorium officially opens its doors.  During its first year, it admitted 31 patients.
 
1928
The Jewish Ex-Patients Home, which helps discharged tuberculosis patients with health education, job training and ongoing emotional and spiritual support, merges with the Los Angeles Sanatorium in 1928.
 
1937
The International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union contributes $45,000 toward the construction of the 64-bed Morris Hillquit Memorial Hospital. The finished building is dedicated in 1938, the sanatorium’s 25th anniversary year.
 
1946
With tuberculosis on the wane, Executive Director Samuel L. Golter outlines a plan to transform the sanatorium into a national medical center focused on cancer and other major diseases.
 
1949
The name "City of Hope", used since 1916, is formally adopted, reflecting the institution's broader ambitions.

1952
City of Hope partners with University of California, Los Angeles to establish the Cancer Research Institute on the Duarte campus.

1955
The so-called “cobalt bomb,” a radiation therapy machine developed by City of Hope scientists, is put into operation. The cobalt bomb delivered radiation to malignancies deep within the human body.

1957
The focus on compassionate care reaches new heights with the opening of Hope Village, which provides on-site housing for patients and their families traveling from across the nation.

1965
Executive Director Ben Horowitz unveils a master plan that calls for enlarging patient care, research and medical education facilities. This included expanding research and treatment programs for cancer and other diseases.

1976
The Bone Marrow Transplantation program (BMT) accepts its first patients. The BMT program will grow to become one of the largest and most successful transplantation programs in the country.

1978
Recombinant DNA techniques pioneered by City of Hope scientists lead to the development of synthetic human insulin (Humulin).

1983
The first Beckman Research Institute, a name that would become synonymous with leading-edge research, is established at City of Hope.

1983
Scientists at City of Hope discover how to manufacture immune proteins known as antibodies. This breakthrough leads to humanized monoclonal antibodies — and a new generation of "smart" cancer drugs including Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.

1997
The first Food and Drug Administration-approved human trials of a gene therapy for HIV/AIDS begin. This line of research would lead, in 2011, to the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma treated through gene therapy.

1998
The National Cancer Institute designates City of Hope as a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

2000
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics opens, enabling City of Hope to create biologically based treatments for use in clinical trials. In 2012, a facility producing chemically based drugs would open. These centers, and a complementary third facility, quickly translate discoveries into treatments.

2001
The National Institutes of Health designates City of Hope as an Islet Cell Resource Center.

2003
City of Hope becomes one of the first U.S. medical centers to perform laparoscopic radical prostatectomies to treat prostate cancer.

2005
The Helford Clinical Research Hospital opens, replacing Hillquit Hospital. The Helford Hospital maximizes the human side of patient care and significantly increases City of Hope’s capacity for surgical procedures and programs such as the BMT.

2008
Scientists at City of Hope begin the first in-human clinical trials of RNA-based gene therapy for HIV-related illnesses.

2010
The City of Hope Medical Foundation is established.

2011
City of Hope reaches its milestone 10,000th bone marrow transplant, becoming one of the largest and most successful transplant programs of its kind in the world.

2013
City of Hope celebrates its 100th anniversary.
 

Culture/Values

Our Mission:
City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we turn science into practical benefit. We turn hope into reality. We accomplish this through exquisite care, innovative research and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes.
 
Our Values:
COMPASSION
From day one, compassion has been woven into the heart and soul of our institution.
Compassion for our patients, their families, and our team members.
 
We show compassion not only through treatment, but also through our philanthropy and advocacy, through our humanistic approach to research and care and through our day-to-day relationships with every individual.
 
We demonstrate compassion for our peers and colleagues by showing empathy and treating each other with dignity and respect.
 
SERVICE WITH A SENSE OF URGENCY
We focus on turning great science into practical benefit as quickly as possible.
 
We tenaciously pursue new and better ways to improve the lives of people around the world. We are driven to provide new treatments for more people every day.
 
Our passion for serving others extends to our own people. We believe that providing opportunities to our own team members to engage and build community with colleagues helps them work more effectively.
 
INTEGRITY
We choose the right path, not the easy one.
 
We promote a “just culture” environment that requires each of us to do the right thing to ensure patient safety. We do what’s best for our patients and our community, every moment of every day.
 
Integrity guides us to passionately engage in our work, step up to every challenge and conduct our business with transparency. We hold ourselves accountable for following through with our commitments and doing the right thing.

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
Our reputation for scientific excellence stems from our determination to aggressively pursue new lines of inquiry.
 
We are lifelong learners committed to making pioneering discoveries and moving them forward for the benefit of patients and the scientific community worldwide. Our curiosity has fueled our innovation, creating life-changing moments and lifesaving breakthroughs, like developing the first synthetic human insulin and numerous cancer-fighting drugs.
 
EXCELLENCE
Our commitment to advancing science while providing compassionate care has established us as the benchmark in fighting cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
We strive for excellence in our processes and outcomes without compromising safety. We encourage every individual to use their best judgment, achieve synergies and make decisions that align with our mission, values and worldwide reputation for excellence.
 
COLLABORATION
We work as one team, united by a common purpose. We are a community of experts, combining the resources of cutting-edge scientific research, drug manufacturing, clinical care, graduate education, philanthropy and supportive care services.
 
Recognizing the value that bringing together diverse perspectives provides, we create an environment where new partnerships thrive, where barriers to freely sharing knowledge do not exist and where the right stakeholders are engaged from the beginning.
 

Our Next 100 Years

At City of Hope, our mission and commitment to transform the future of health is based on our past success at doing just that. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for thousands of patients and families. And our work is just beginning.
 
As we look ahead, our strategic plan will provide the focus necessary to uniquely attack life-threatening diseases. We’ll retain our innovative nimbleness to quickly advance the most promising areas of research, while retaining our commitment to the exquisite care of our patients and families.
 
Events and collaborations like Concert for Hope, Walk for Hope and ThinkCure! will enable us to extend our mission to younger generations, ensuring an ongoing legacy of diverse and committed supporters ready to move us forward into our second century of Hope.
 

Diversity and Inclusion

At City of Hope, we strive to create an inclusive environment that engages all of our employees and provides them with opportunities to develop and grow, both personally and professionally.
 
Each day brings an opportunity to strengthen our work, leverage our unique perspectives and improve our patients' experiences by learning from others.
 
We invite you to learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Click here to download our brochure.

Who We Are

Who We Are

City of Hope is dedicated to making a difference in the lives of people with cancer, diabetes and other serious illnesses. Our mission is to transform the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit, hope into reality. We accomplish this by providing outstanding care, conducting innovative research and offering vital education programs focused on eliminating these diseases.
 
Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 41 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute. Our role as leaders in patient care, basic and clinical research, and the translation of science into tangible benefit is widely acknowledged.
 
Our community includes research associates, scientists, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, graduate students, fundraising specialists, marketing professionals, volunteers and an extensive support staff. We are united by our desire to find cures, save lives and transform the future of health. Every discovery we make and every new treatment we create gives people the chance to live longer, better and more fully.
 
City of Hope continues to be a pioneer of patient centered care and remains committed to its tradition of exceptional care for patients, families and communities. Each day, we live out our credo:
 
"There is no profit in curing the body, if, in the process, we destroy the soul."
 

100 Year Legacy

The City of Hope Story

The City of Hope story began in 1913, when a group of volunteers, spurred by compassion to help those afflicted with tuberculosis, established the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association (JCRA) and raised money to start a free, nonsectarian tuberculosis sanatorium.
 
After several fundraisers, the JCRA put a down payment on 10 acres of sun-soaked land in Duarte, where they would establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium a year later. The original sanatorium consisted of two canvas cottages. So was launched a century-long journey that would place City of Hope at the forefront of the nation’s leading medical and research institutions. 
 
By the mid-1940s, thanks to the discovery of antibiotics, tuberculosis was on the decline in the U.S. However, City of Hope rose to the next medical challenge, tackling the catastrophic disease of cancer — and later on, diabetes and HIV/AIDS — while reaffirming its humanitarian vision that “health is a human right.”

In the spirit of that vision, Samuel H. Golter, one of City of Hope’s early leaders, coined the phrase, “There is no profit in curing the body if, in the process, we destroy the soul.” Those words became City of Hope’s credo.
 
Over the decades, research conducted at City of Hope has led to significant advances in modern medicine, including the development of the first synthetic human insulin, human growth hormone and the technology behind the widely used cancer-fighting drugs Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.
 
Today, City of Hope has been designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest recognition bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, and is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, with research and treatment protocols that advance care throughout the nation.
 
As we look toward the next 100 years, we continue our mission and commitment to transform the future of medicine. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for countless patients and their loved ones.
 
And our work is just beginning.
 
Historical Milestones
 
1913
The Jewish Consumptive Relief Association was officially incorporated. 10 acres of land were purchased to establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium.

1914
The sanatorium officially opens its doors.  During its first year, it admitted 31 patients.
 
1928
The Jewish Ex-Patients Home, which helps discharged tuberculosis patients with health education, job training and ongoing emotional and spiritual support, merges with the Los Angeles Sanatorium in 1928.
 
1937
The International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union contributes $45,000 toward the construction of the 64-bed Morris Hillquit Memorial Hospital. The finished building is dedicated in 1938, the sanatorium’s 25th anniversary year.
 
1946
With tuberculosis on the wane, Executive Director Samuel L. Golter outlines a plan to transform the sanatorium into a national medical center focused on cancer and other major diseases.
 
1949
The name "City of Hope", used since 1916, is formally adopted, reflecting the institution's broader ambitions.

1952
City of Hope partners with University of California, Los Angeles to establish the Cancer Research Institute on the Duarte campus.

1955
The so-called “cobalt bomb,” a radiation therapy machine developed by City of Hope scientists, is put into operation. The cobalt bomb delivered radiation to malignancies deep within the human body.

1957
The focus on compassionate care reaches new heights with the opening of Hope Village, which provides on-site housing for patients and their families traveling from across the nation.

1965
Executive Director Ben Horowitz unveils a master plan that calls for enlarging patient care, research and medical education facilities. This included expanding research and treatment programs for cancer and other diseases.

1976
The Bone Marrow Transplantation program (BMT) accepts its first patients. The BMT program will grow to become one of the largest and most successful transplantation programs in the country.

1978
Recombinant DNA techniques pioneered by City of Hope scientists lead to the development of synthetic human insulin (Humulin).

1983
The first Beckman Research Institute, a name that would become synonymous with leading-edge research, is established at City of Hope.

1983
Scientists at City of Hope discover how to manufacture immune proteins known as antibodies. This breakthrough leads to humanized monoclonal antibodies — and a new generation of "smart" cancer drugs including Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.

1997
The first Food and Drug Administration-approved human trials of a gene therapy for HIV/AIDS begin. This line of research would lead, in 2011, to the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma treated through gene therapy.

1998
The National Cancer Institute designates City of Hope as a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

2000
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics opens, enabling City of Hope to create biologically based treatments for use in clinical trials. In 2012, a facility producing chemically based drugs would open. These centers, and a complementary third facility, quickly translate discoveries into treatments.

2001
The National Institutes of Health designates City of Hope as an Islet Cell Resource Center.

2003
City of Hope becomes one of the first U.S. medical centers to perform laparoscopic radical prostatectomies to treat prostate cancer.

2005
The Helford Clinical Research Hospital opens, replacing Hillquit Hospital. The Helford Hospital maximizes the human side of patient care and significantly increases City of Hope’s capacity for surgical procedures and programs such as the BMT.

2008
Scientists at City of Hope begin the first in-human clinical trials of RNA-based gene therapy for HIV-related illnesses.

2010
The City of Hope Medical Foundation is established.

2011
City of Hope reaches its milestone 10,000th bone marrow transplant, becoming one of the largest and most successful transplant programs of its kind in the world.

2013
City of Hope celebrates its 100th anniversary.
 

Culture/Values

Culture/Values

Our Mission:
City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we turn science into practical benefit. We turn hope into reality. We accomplish this through exquisite care, innovative research and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes.
 
Our Values:
COMPASSION
From day one, compassion has been woven into the heart and soul of our institution.
Compassion for our patients, their families, and our team members.
 
We show compassion not only through treatment, but also through our philanthropy and advocacy, through our humanistic approach to research and care and through our day-to-day relationships with every individual.
 
We demonstrate compassion for our peers and colleagues by showing empathy and treating each other with dignity and respect.
 
SERVICE WITH A SENSE OF URGENCY
We focus on turning great science into practical benefit as quickly as possible.
 
We tenaciously pursue new and better ways to improve the lives of people around the world. We are driven to provide new treatments for more people every day.
 
Our passion for serving others extends to our own people. We believe that providing opportunities to our own team members to engage and build community with colleagues helps them work more effectively.
 
INTEGRITY
We choose the right path, not the easy one.
 
We promote a “just culture” environment that requires each of us to do the right thing to ensure patient safety. We do what’s best for our patients and our community, every moment of every day.
 
Integrity guides us to passionately engage in our work, step up to every challenge and conduct our business with transparency. We hold ourselves accountable for following through with our commitments and doing the right thing.

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
Our reputation for scientific excellence stems from our determination to aggressively pursue new lines of inquiry.
 
We are lifelong learners committed to making pioneering discoveries and moving them forward for the benefit of patients and the scientific community worldwide. Our curiosity has fueled our innovation, creating life-changing moments and lifesaving breakthroughs, like developing the first synthetic human insulin and numerous cancer-fighting drugs.
 
EXCELLENCE
Our commitment to advancing science while providing compassionate care has established us as the benchmark in fighting cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
We strive for excellence in our processes and outcomes without compromising safety. We encourage every individual to use their best judgment, achieve synergies and make decisions that align with our mission, values and worldwide reputation for excellence.
 
COLLABORATION
We work as one team, united by a common purpose. We are a community of experts, combining the resources of cutting-edge scientific research, drug manufacturing, clinical care, graduate education, philanthropy and supportive care services.
 
Recognizing the value that bringing together diverse perspectives provides, we create an environment where new partnerships thrive, where barriers to freely sharing knowledge do not exist and where the right stakeholders are engaged from the beginning.
 

Our Next 100 Years

Our Next 100 Years

At City of Hope, our mission and commitment to transform the future of health is based on our past success at doing just that. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for thousands of patients and families. And our work is just beginning.
 
As we look ahead, our strategic plan will provide the focus necessary to uniquely attack life-threatening diseases. We’ll retain our innovative nimbleness to quickly advance the most promising areas of research, while retaining our commitment to the exquisite care of our patients and families.
 
Events and collaborations like Concert for Hope, Walk for Hope and ThinkCure! will enable us to extend our mission to younger generations, ensuring an ongoing legacy of diverse and committed supporters ready to move us forward into our second century of Hope.
 

Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion

At City of Hope, we strive to create an inclusive environment that engages all of our employees and provides them with opportunities to develop and grow, both personally and professionally.
 
Each day brings an opportunity to strengthen our work, leverage our unique perspectives and improve our patients' experiences by learning from others.
 
We invite you to learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Click here to download our brochure.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma facts: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer that starts in cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system. Lymphocytes are in the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues (such as the spleen and bone marrow). Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common cancers in the U.S....
  • Few clinical cancer trials include older adults – and yet, more than 60 percent of cancer cases in the United States occur in people age 65 and older. The result is a dearth of knowledge on how to treat the very population most likely to be diagnosed with cancer. Now, the American Society of Clinical […]
  • Scientists at City of Hope and UCLA have become the first to inhibit the expression of a protein, called TWIST that promotes tumor invasion and metastasis when activated by cancer cells. As such, they’ve taken the first step in developing a potential new therapy for some of the deadliest cancers, including ovar...
  • Upon completing her final round of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer earlier this month, Maria Velazquez-McIntyre, a 51-year-old Antelope Valley resident, celebrated the milestone by giving other patients a symbol of hope – a Survivor Bell. The bell may look ordinary, but for cancer patients undergoing chemothera...
  • Many Americans understand that obesity is tied to heart disease and diabetes but, according to a new survey, too few – only 7 percent – know that obesity increases the risk of cancer. Specific biological characteristics can increase cancer risk in obese people, and multiple studies have shown correlations betwe...
  • As breast cancer survivors know, the disease’s impact lingers in ways both big and small long after treatment has ended. A new study suggests that weight gain – and a possible corresponding increase in heart disease and diabetes risk – may be part of that impact. In the first study to evaluate weight chan...
  • Becoming what’s known as an independent scientific researcher is no small task, especially when working to translate research into meaningful health outcomes. Yet that independent status is vital, enabling researchers to lead studies and avenues of inquiry that they believe to be promising. Clinicians, especial...
  • 720 days. That’s how long Alex Tung, 38, had to give up surfing after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. For most people, even some surfers, such a hiatus wouldn’t be a big deal, but for Tung, surfing has been everything. The Southern California resident began surfing when he was in elemen...
  • There are few among us who have not experienced loss of a friend or loved one, often without warning, or like those of us who care for people with cancer, after a lingering illness. It is a time when emotions run high and deep, and as time passes from the moment of loss, we often […]
  • For the past four years, neurosurgeon and scientist Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D., has been studying how breast cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to the brain, where they become life-threatening tumors. Known as secondary brain tumors, these cancers have become increasingly common as treatment advances have ena...
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin. A primary symptom is a rash that arises initially in areas of the skin that are not normally exposed to sunlight....
  • There’s science camp, and then there’s “mystery” science camp. City of Hope’s new science camp for middle school students is of the especially engaging latter variety. From Monday, July 13, to Friday, July 17, rising middle-school students from across the San Gabriel Valley were presented with a “patient” with ...
  • Women diagnosed with breast cancer quickly learn their tumor’s type, meaning the characteristics that fuel its growth. That label guides the treatment of their disease, as well as their prognosis when it comes to treatment effectiveness. Sometimes, however, doctors can’t accurately predict treatment effectivene...
  • In years past, Bladder Cancer Awareness Month has been a sobering reminder of a disease with few treatment options. For patients with metastatic disease (disease that has spread from the bladder to distant organs), average survival is typically just over one year. Fortunately, things are changing. Academic inst...
  • Tina Wang was diagnosed with Stage 4 diffuse large b cell lymphoma at age 22. She first sought treatment at her local hospital, undergoing two cycles of treatment. When the treatment failed to eradicate her cancer, she came to City of Hope. Here, Wang underwent an autologous stem cell transplant and participate...