A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Cancer Genetics Education Program Bookmark and Share

Cancer Genetics Education Program

The Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope offers educational coursesand self-teaching tools forprofessionals in the fields of cancer and cancer genetics.ThisCancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) is supported inpart by funding fromthe NCI (IRC4CA153828-01 andIR25CA112486).
 
Dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis for cancer have led to the development of new technologies and tools for genetic cancer risk assessment. The Cancer Genetics Education Program at City of Hope offers a series of comprehensive learning tools designed to enhance the education of primary care physicians and clinical oncology professionals on the topics of cancer genetics and cancer risk assessment, and their application to patient care. Through a series of educational courses, workshops, seminars, newsletters and a direct, interactive electronic communications network, professionals can be tutored in the latest information on cancer molecular genetics, the fundamentals of obtaining an adequate family history, understanding genetic cancer risk assessment, ethical and legal complexities of genetic testing, and other current/timely topics.
 
Cancer Genetics Career Development Program
City of Hope offers an innovative  Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP) whichprovides interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. The Traineeship is open to three applicants per year.
 
Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment
City of Hope's Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers an annual CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice
City of Hope CCG Community of Practice brings cancer genetics practitioners from diverse practice settings together for professional learning, enduring patient-centered support and dynamic community-based research collaborations to promote quality care and improved patient outcomes across the U.S. and internationally.

Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN)

The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN) is a large research group of over 40 collaborating sites in the United States, Mexico, and South America. The cornerstone of this network is the City of Hope Hereditary Cancer Research Registry (Molecular Genetic Studies in Cancer Patients and their Relatives; IRB# 96144), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at the City of Hope in 1996, by Principal Investigator Jeffrey Weitzel, MD. The registry serves as a biospecimen repository with personal and family medical history, psycho-social and clinical follow-up data, and 4-generation family pedigree. As members of the CCGCRN, research collaborators can use the message board and forums to post questions and communicate with other members in the network.
 
 
City of Hope CCGCRN Objectives
 
  • To create common and complimentary community-based, locally relevant cancer genomics/genetics research agendas, especially among underserved outreach clinics
  • To address geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic disparities in cancer genetics healthcare and research participation
  • To leverage next-generation genomic technologies to engage/promote hereditary cancer research and clinical translation globally, with a focus in Latin America
 
General questions or comments may be submitted via email to: ccgcrn@coh.org
 
 
General links of interest:
 
Links for members:

Working Group

Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Working Group is a CME-accredited interdisciplinary cancer genetics case conference series conducted each week by the City of Hope clinical team. CSPPN and affiliated clinicians across the U.S. present cases from their community practices via web conferencing for discussion and recommendations on risk assessment, surveillance, risk management and identification of research eligibility for cases covering the full spectrum of hereditary cancer.

2015 Clinical Cancer Genomics Update Conference

 
"From Evidence to Action: Next-Generation Approaches to Cancer Risk Assessment and Research"
City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG), in collaboration with the University of Chicago, is excited to announce our 4th annual CME/CEU-accredited clinical cancer genetics and genomics update conference. The two-day conference will be held on Friday and Saturday, February 27 and 28, 2015, at City of Hope, Cooper Auditorium, in Duarte, CA.
 
 
 
 
Register earely and save!
 
        Conference Fee Structure*         
CCGCoP**
members:
Non-CCGCoP
members:
Physicians $200 $275
Genetic Counselors $100 $175
Nurses & other Health Professionals (NP, PA, SW) $100 $175
Industry $200 $275
Resident/Fellow $75 $125

*After 12/28/14, all fees will increase by $50.
**Affiliation with City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics CCGCoP & CCGCRN
 
  • Prices include breakfast and lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a fun-filled networking dinner on Friday evening!
 
  • A block of rooms has been secured at a rate of $132 for single occupancy and $66 for shared at the Courtyard by Marriott, Monrovia, February 26 to 28, 2015. Don’t miss out on this great rate! (Conference attendees who want to extend their stay at the hotel may contact Karen Gadsby, at  626-531-8008.)
 
 
 
(group code pending)
 
To share accommodations with another conference attendee, contact Gloria Nunez at gnunez@coh.org no later than January 31, 2015.
 
 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Cancer Genetics Education Program

Cancer Genetics Education Program

The Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope offers educational coursesand self-teaching tools forprofessionals in the fields of cancer and cancer genetics.ThisCancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) is supported inpart by funding fromthe NCI (IRC4CA153828-01 andIR25CA112486).
 
Dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis for cancer have led to the development of new technologies and tools for genetic cancer risk assessment. The Cancer Genetics Education Program at City of Hope offers a series of comprehensive learning tools designed to enhance the education of primary care physicians and clinical oncology professionals on the topics of cancer genetics and cancer risk assessment, and their application to patient care. Through a series of educational courses, workshops, seminars, newsletters and a direct, interactive electronic communications network, professionals can be tutored in the latest information on cancer molecular genetics, the fundamentals of obtaining an adequate family history, understanding genetic cancer risk assessment, ethical and legal complexities of genetic testing, and other current/timely topics.
 
Cancer Genetics Career Development Program
City of Hope offers an innovative  Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP) whichprovides interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. The Traineeship is open to three applicants per year.
 
Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment
City of Hope's Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers an annual CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice
City of Hope CCG Community of Practice brings cancer genetics practitioners from diverse practice settings together for professional learning, enduring patient-centered support and dynamic community-based research collaborations to promote quality care and improved patient outcomes across the U.S. and internationally.

CCGCRN

Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN)

The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN) is a large research group of over 40 collaborating sites in the United States, Mexico, and South America. The cornerstone of this network is the City of Hope Hereditary Cancer Research Registry (Molecular Genetic Studies in Cancer Patients and their Relatives; IRB# 96144), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at the City of Hope in 1996, by Principal Investigator Jeffrey Weitzel, MD. The registry serves as a biospecimen repository with personal and family medical history, psycho-social and clinical follow-up data, and 4-generation family pedigree. As members of the CCGCRN, research collaborators can use the message board and forums to post questions and communicate with other members in the network.
 
 
City of Hope CCGCRN Objectives
 
  • To create common and complimentary community-based, locally relevant cancer genomics/genetics research agendas, especially among underserved outreach clinics
  • To address geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic disparities in cancer genetics healthcare and research participation
  • To leverage next-generation genomic technologies to engage/promote hereditary cancer research and clinical translation globally, with a focus in Latin America
 
General questions or comments may be submitted via email to: ccgcrn@coh.org
 
 
General links of interest:
 
Links for members:

Working Group

Working Group

Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Working Group is a CME-accredited interdisciplinary cancer genetics case conference series conducted each week by the City of Hope clinical team. CSPPN and affiliated clinicians across the U.S. present cases from their community practices via web conferencing for discussion and recommendations on risk assessment, surveillance, risk management and identification of research eligibility for cases covering the full spectrum of hereditary cancer.

Cancer Genetics Community Link

Cancer Genetics Community Link Discussion Board

The Cancer Genetics Community Discussion Board is a Web-based discussion board for collaborative, interdisciplinary practice-based support and continuing professional learning. CCG Community of Practice members are encouraged to post and respond to case-based questions and share resources with a growing, multidisciplinary network of professionals engaged in the practice of clinical cancer genetics. Messages are posted and archived under topic-specific forums, allowing members to search for information by topic of interest.
 
Case Consultation Questions

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Uninformative BRCA Test Results)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Testing)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Probability/Empiric Risks)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Risk Management)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

Male Breast Cancers

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Lynch Related)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Polyposis Syndromes)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Non-Colorectal)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Risk Management)

Genitourinary Cancer

Genodermatoses

Endocrine Neoplasias

Pediatric Cancers

ELSI-Ethical, Legal, Social Issues

 

Clinical Resources

Progeny/Pedigree Drawing Issues

 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Working Group

CCG Working Group Case Conferences

 

Comments/Suggestions

Suggestion/Comment Box

 

2015 Update Conference

2015 Clinical Cancer Genomics Update Conference

 
"From Evidence to Action: Next-Generation Approaches to Cancer Risk Assessment and Research"
City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG), in collaboration with the University of Chicago, is excited to announce our 4th annual CME/CEU-accredited clinical cancer genetics and genomics update conference. The two-day conference will be held on Friday and Saturday, February 27 and 28, 2015, at City of Hope, Cooper Auditorium, in Duarte, CA.
 
 
 
 
Register earely and save!
 
        Conference Fee Structure*         
CCGCoP**
members:
Non-CCGCoP
members:
Physicians $200 $275
Genetic Counselors $100 $175
Nurses & other Health Professionals (NP, PA, SW) $100 $175
Industry $200 $275
Resident/Fellow $75 $125

*After 12/28/14, all fees will increase by $50.
**Affiliation with City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics CCGCoP & CCGCRN
 
  • Prices include breakfast and lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a fun-filled networking dinner on Friday evening!
 
  • A block of rooms has been secured at a rate of $132 for single occupancy and $66 for shared at the Courtyard by Marriott, Monrovia, February 26 to 28, 2015. Don’t miss out on this great rate! (Conference attendees who want to extend their stay at the hotel may contact Karen Gadsby, at  626-531-8008.)
 
 
 
(group code pending)
 
To share accommodations with another conference attendee, contact Gloria Nunez at gnunez@coh.org no later than January 31, 2015.
 
 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Clinical Cancer Genetics
The City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics is committed to being a national leader in the advancement of cancer genetics, screening and prevention, through innovative patient care, research and education.

Contact Us
  • 800-826-HOPE (4673)
  • For more information about the Cancer Screening & Prevention Program, call 626-256-8662, ext. 2.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
City of Hope Breakthroughs
Get the latest in City of Hope's research, treatment and news you can use on our blog, Breakthroughs.
 
 
NEWS & UPDATES
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...
  • The leading risk factor for breast cancer is simply being a woman. The second top risk factor is getting older. Obviously, these two factors cannot be controlled, which is why all women should be aware of their risk and how to minimize those risks. Many risk factors can be mitigated, and simple changes can lead...
  • All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. Although white women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, African-American women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethni...
  • First, the good news: HIV infections have dropped dramatically over the past 30 years. Doctors, researchers and health officials have made great strides in preventing and treating the disease, turning what was once a death sentence into, for some, a chronic condition. Now, the reality check: HIV is still a worl...
  • Screening for breast cancer has dramatically increased the number of cancers found before they cause symptoms – catching the disease when it is most treatable and curable. Mammograms, however, are not infallible. It’s important to conduct self-exams, and know the signs and symptoms that should be checked by a h...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free.   In his previ...
  • In a single day, former professional triathlete Lisa Birk learned she couldn’t have children and that she had breast cancer. “Where do you go from there?” she asks. For Birk, who swims three miles, runs 10 miles and cycles every day, the answer  ultimately was a decision to take control of her cancer care. Afte...
  • More and more people are surviving cancer, thanks to advanced cancer treatments and screening tools. Today there are nearly 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. But in up to 20 percent of cancer patients, the disease ultimately spreads to their brain. Each year, nearly 170,000 new cases of brain ...
  • Cancer cells are masters of survival. Despite excessive damage to their most basic workings and the constant vigilance of the body’s immune system, they manage to persevere. Much of this extraordinary ability to survive falls under the control of proteins bearing the name STAT, short for signal transducer and a...
  • One person receives the breast cancer diagnosis, but the cancer affects the entire family. Couples, in particular, can find the diagnosis and treatment challenging, especially if they have traditional male/female communication styles. “Though every individual is unique, men and women often respond differently d...
  • Here’s a statistic you’ll hear and read frequently over the next month: One in eight women born in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in her lifetime. Although this statement is accurate, based on breast cancer incidence rates in 2013, it’s often misunderstood. Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., d...
  • This time of year, how can anyone not think pink? Through the power of pastel packaging, October has been etched permanently into the American public’s consciousness as Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The color pink is now synonymous with breast cancer. Suffice to say, awareness has been raised. Now itR...