A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Our Approach - Brain Tumors

As a patient at City of Hope, you have a highly experienced and dedicated team to treat your brain tumor. Whether you have a benign pituitary tumor or an aggressive glioblastoma, we offer a comprehensive, individualized approach to treating brain tumors.
 
Our Brain Tumor Team, including surgeons, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists, creates treatment plans tailored to each patient. Where possible, our surgeons use minimally invasive surgical techniques that minimize injury to the brain and surrounding structure. And our radiation oncologists use state-of-the-art radiation therapy techniques, including Helical TomoTherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which deliver highly localized doses of radiation to primary tumors and metastases while sparing as much normal tissue as possible. 
 
City of Hope researchers are conducting clinical trials of innovative therapies to find more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors. We believe the future of neurosurgery and brain tumor treatment involves the merger of science and technology, and we are developing advanced, creative methods that aim to give the upper hand to patients battling malignant brain tumors.
 
These highly complex approaches include gene therapy and immunotherapy – methods that seek to circumvent barriers that hinder effective treatment. We are particularly excited about studies that harness the neural stem cell’s ability to travel to the tumor and bring chemotherapy to the brain, and the use of genetically modified T cells as an immunotherapy strategy to help your immune system fight off the cancer.
 
In addition, our researchers are developing methods of measuring drug levels in the brain to determine which promising chemotherapy agent should be used in brain tumor patients. We are also developing minimally invasive techniques that allow localized removal of brain tumors and delivery of treatments. 
 
Through our research, our ultimate goal is not to simply improve survival rates, but to eradicate the lethal threat of glioblastoma altogether.
 
 

 
 
 

Our Approach

Our Approach - Brain Tumors

As a patient at City of Hope, you have a highly experienced and dedicated team to treat your brain tumor. Whether you have a benign pituitary tumor or an aggressive glioblastoma, we offer a comprehensive, individualized approach to treating brain tumors.
 
Our Brain Tumor Team, including surgeons, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists, creates treatment plans tailored to each patient. Where possible, our surgeons use minimally invasive surgical techniques that minimize injury to the brain and surrounding structure. And our radiation oncologists use state-of-the-art radiation therapy techniques, including Helical TomoTherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which deliver highly localized doses of radiation to primary tumors and metastases while sparing as much normal tissue as possible. 
 
City of Hope researchers are conducting clinical trials of innovative therapies to find more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors. We believe the future of neurosurgery and brain tumor treatment involves the merger of science and technology, and we are developing advanced, creative methods that aim to give the upper hand to patients battling malignant brain tumors.
 
These highly complex approaches include gene therapy and immunotherapy – methods that seek to circumvent barriers that hinder effective treatment. We are particularly excited about studies that harness the neural stem cell’s ability to travel to the tumor and bring chemotherapy to the brain, and the use of genetically modified T cells as an immunotherapy strategy to help your immune system fight off the cancer.
 
In addition, our researchers are developing methods of measuring drug levels in the brain to determine which promising chemotherapy agent should be used in brain tumor patients. We are also developing minimally invasive techniques that allow localized removal of brain tumors and delivery of treatments. 
 
Through our research, our ultimate goal is not to simply improve survival rates, but to eradicate the lethal threat of glioblastoma altogether.
 
 

 
 
 
Quick Links
Refer a Patient
Physicians can choose a number of options to refer a patient:

  • Call 800-826-HOPE (4673) to speak with a patient referral specialist.
  • Fax the patient face sheet to 626-301-8432
  • Complete an online callback request form
 
Featured Videos
Brain Tumor Medical Minute
Division of Neurosurgery
City of Hope has some of the most advanced tools for the surgical removal of brain and spine tumors. Learn how these tools have enabled surgery of the highest precision while minimizing adverse outcomes.
 
City of Hope’s Division of Neurosurgery focuses on surgical treatment of both benign and malignant brain, spine and pituitary tumors. Our physicians are nationally-recognized experts in neurosurgery and neuro-oncology, and employ today’s leading edge therapies.

For questions or additional information, please call 626-471-7100.
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