A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Our Approach Bookmark and Share

Our Approach - Brain Tumors

As a patient at City of Hope, you have a highly experienced and dedicated team to treat your brain tumor. Whether you have a benign pituitary tumor or an aggressive glioblastoma, we offer a comprehensive, individualized approach to treating brain tumors.
 
Our Brain Tumor Team, including surgeons, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists, creates treatment plans tailored to each patient. Where possible, our surgeons use minimally invasive surgical techniques that minimize injury to the brain and surrounding structure. And our radiation oncologists use state-of-the-art radiation therapy techniques, including Helical TomoTherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which deliver highly localized doses of radiation to primary tumors and metastases while sparing as much normal tissue as possible. 
 
City of Hope researchers are conducting clinical trials of innovative therapies to find more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors. We believe the future of neurosurgery and brain tumor treatment involves the merger of science and technology, and we are developing advanced, creative methods that aim to give the upper hand to patients battling malignant brain tumors.
 
These highly complex approaches include gene therapy and immunotherapy – methods that seek to circumvent barriers that hinder effective treatment. We are particularly excited about studies that harness the neural stem cell’s ability to travel to the tumor and bring chemotherapy to the brain, and the use of genetically modified T cells as an immunotherapy strategy to help your immune system fight off the cancer.
 
In addition, our researchers are developing methods of measuring drug levels in the brain to determine which promising chemotherapy agent should be used in brain tumor patients. We are also developing minimally invasive techniques that allow localized removal of brain tumors and delivery of treatments. 
 
Through our research, our ultimate goal is not to simply improve survival rates, but to eradicate the lethal threat of glioblastoma altogether.
 
 

 
 
 

Our Approach

Our Approach - Brain Tumors

As a patient at City of Hope, you have a highly experienced and dedicated team to treat your brain tumor. Whether you have a benign pituitary tumor or an aggressive glioblastoma, we offer a comprehensive, individualized approach to treating brain tumors.
 
Our Brain Tumor Team, including surgeons, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists, creates treatment plans tailored to each patient. Where possible, our surgeons use minimally invasive surgical techniques that minimize injury to the brain and surrounding structure. And our radiation oncologists use state-of-the-art radiation therapy techniques, including Helical TomoTherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which deliver highly localized doses of radiation to primary tumors and metastases while sparing as much normal tissue as possible. 
 
City of Hope researchers are conducting clinical trials of innovative therapies to find more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors. We believe the future of neurosurgery and brain tumor treatment involves the merger of science and technology, and we are developing advanced, creative methods that aim to give the upper hand to patients battling malignant brain tumors.
 
These highly complex approaches include gene therapy and immunotherapy – methods that seek to circumvent barriers that hinder effective treatment. We are particularly excited about studies that harness the neural stem cell’s ability to travel to the tumor and bring chemotherapy to the brain, and the use of genetically modified T cells as an immunotherapy strategy to help your immune system fight off the cancer.
 
In addition, our researchers are developing methods of measuring drug levels in the brain to determine which promising chemotherapy agent should be used in brain tumor patients. We are also developing minimally invasive techniques that allow localized removal of brain tumors and delivery of treatments. 
 
Through our research, our ultimate goal is not to simply improve survival rates, but to eradicate the lethal threat of glioblastoma altogether.
 
 

 
 
 
Quick Links
Featured Videos
Division of Neurosurgery
City of Hope has some of the most advanced tools for the surgical removal of brain and spine tumors. Learn how these tools have enabled surgery of the highest precision while minimizing adverse outcomes.
 
City of Hope’s Division of Neurosurgery focuses on surgical treatment of both benign and malignant brain, spine and pituitary tumors. Our physicians are nationally-recognized experts in neurosurgery and neuro-oncology, and employ today’s leading edge therapies.

For questions or additional information, please call 626-471-7100.
Brain Tumor Medical Minute
Refer a Patient
Physicians can choose a number of options to refer a patient:

 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • The physical side effects of cancer can damage anyone’s self-confidence, but especially that of women who, rightly or wrongly, are more likely to find their appearance (or their own perception of their appearance) directly connected to their ability to face the world with something resembling ap...
  • The promise of stem cell therapy has long been studied in laboratories. Now, as medicine enters an era in which this therapy will be increasingly available to patients, the nurses who help deliver it will be in the spotlight. City of Hope, which has launched its Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT...
  • Just because you can treat a condition, such as high cholesterol, at the end of life — well, that doesn’t mean you should. That’s the basic lesson of a study to be published March 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The ramifications go far beyond that. The research, in which City of Hope’s Betty Fe...
  • The understanding of the relationship between genetics and cancer risk continues to grow, with more genetic testing than ever before available to patients. However, the adage that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is applicable: Without context for what a test result means, and without meaningful guidance...
  • Standard prostate biopsies haven’t changed significantly in the past 30 years – nor have the problems inherent with them. Regular biopsies have an expected error rate: Tumors may potentially be undersampled and, 30 percent of the time, men who undergo a radical prostatectomy are found to have more aggress...
  • In the field of cancer, patients have had surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy as options. Now, as City of Hope officially opens the Alpha Clinic for Cellular Therapy and Innovation, patients battling cancer and other life-threatening diseases have another option: stem-cell-based therapy. The Alpha Clini...
  • How does the environment affect our health? Specifically, how does it affect our risk of cancer? City of Hope physicians and researchers recently answered those questions in an Ask the Experts event in Corona, California, explaining the underlying facts about how the environment can affect our health. Moderator...
  • Nurses and other medical professionals have come to understand that it’s not enough just to fight disease. They also must provide pain relief, symptom control, and an unrelenting commitment to improve patients’ quality of life — especially at the end of life. Not too long ago, this was a relatively ...
  • “Tonight, I’m launching a new precision medicine initiative to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer.” These were the words of President Barack Obama on Jan. 20, 2015, during his State of the Union address. So what is precision medicine, and how close are we to making it a reality for...
  • March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. How sad, yet how serendipitous, that the co-creator of “The Simpsons” Sam Simon passed away in March after a four-year battle against colon cancer. What message can we all learn from his illness that can help us prevent and overcome colon cancer in our own lives? Colon can...
  • Misagh Karimi, M.D., assistant clinical professor, is a medical oncologist at one of City of Hope’s newest community practice locations, located in Corona in Riverside County. A recent community health report from Corona’s public health department stated that obesity rates for teens and adults in Riverside Coun...
  • In 1975, the median survival for patients with ovarian cancer was about 12 months. Today, the median survival is more than 5 years. Although researchers and clinicians are far from satisfied, the progress in ovarian cancer treatment is encouraging, said Robert Morgan, M.D., F.A.C.P., professor of medical oncolo...
  • Colorectal cancer may be one of the most common cancers in both men and women, but it’s also one of the most curable cancers. Today, because of effective screening tests and more advanced treatment options, there are more than 1 million survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States. Here, colorectal...
  • Breast cancer treatment can damage a woman’s ability to become pregnant, making the impact on fertility one of the key factors that many consider when choosing a therapy regimen. Now a study has found that breast cancer patients treated with a hormone-blocking drug in addition to chemotherapy were less li...
  • My colleagues in the clinic know I’ve got a soft spot. Last week, a patient of mine offered me a fantastic compliment. “You’re looking younger these days, Dr. Pal!” she said, offering me a big hug as she proceeded out of the clinic room. Lovely, I thought. The early morning workouts are paying off. She continue...