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Analytical Pharmacology Core Facility (APCF)

The Analytical Pharmacology Core facility (APCF) encourages and facilitiates collaborative research between basic scientists and clinicians by providing a wide range of analytical services that benefit both groups. The APCF conducts pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for both chemotherapy clinical trials and peer-reviewed preclinical studies.
 
The primary services of the APCF are:
 
  • Assay development and analysis (LS/MS/MS, GC/MS, HPLC, and AAS) of chemotherapeutic agents and related compounds.
  • Study design and expert analysis of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and metabolic data.
 
The facility’s services are available to both City of Hope and external researchers.
 

Research reported in this publication included work performed in the Analytical Pharmacology Core supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award number P30CA33572. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
 

 

Services and Equipment

Services
Services currently offered by the Analytical Pharmacology Core facility:
  • Initial consultation on research projects
  • Study design and protocol review
  • Development, implementation, and validation of analytical methods.
  • Sample analysis (LC/MS/MS, GC/MS, HPLC, and AAS).
  • Pharmacokinetic programming and data analysis
  • Sample acquisition, tracking, and storage. Sample acquisition, storage analysis, including HPLC, LC/MS/MS and GC/MS, and microbiological assay methodologies
  • Participation in collaborative writing

Equipment
Analytical capabilities cover a wide range of available methods including:
  • LC/MC/MS (Waters Quattro Ultima and Quattro Premier XE
  • GC/MS (2 Shimadzu QP-5000's
  • HPLC with UV/Vis, fluorescence, and electrochemical detection (Shimadzu and Thermo Separations)
  • AAS with graphite furnace (PerkinElmer AAnalyst 300

HPLC capability includes four complete systems, which are integrated directly to dedicated computers running EZChrom software for automated post-run analysis. Three of the HPLC systems include automated injection systems for more convenient analysis of a large number of samples.

Instrument control and data acquisition for the Micromass mass detector and the associated Agilent HPLC are coordinated through a MassLynx-NT workstation running MassLynx and QuanLynx software. The GC/MS instrumentation is composed of a Shimadzu Model QP-5000 EI gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, interfaced directly to a dedicated computer running CLASS-5000 software.

In addition to the chromatographic instrumentation, a Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 300 flameless atomic absorption spectrometer (AA) is available for the determination of metals and metal-containing compounds such as cisplatin and its analogs. Sample analysis by AA utilizes an automated injection system, with data acquisition and analysis using WinLab software on a dedicated computer.

 

Using the Facility

Scheduling Equipment
To access the Analytical Pharmacology Core facility, investigators should contact Timothy Synold to start the process.

Abstract for Grants

The APCF is located in the Shapiro Building and the analytical equipment is in room 1042. Freezers for sample storage are also located in the Beckman Center Freezer Farm, Room 1012. An additional HPLC with a diode array detector that is used part time for core service activities is located in room 1002 of the Fox North Research Building. HPLC capability includes four complete HPLC systems consisting of seven solvent delivery modules (4 Shimadzu LC-10A's, 2 Shimadzu LC-10AD's, 1 SpectraSystem P4000). HPLC detection capabilities cover a wide range of currently available methods, including UV/Vis (Shimadzu SPD-10AV), fluorescence (Shimadzu RF-10A), electrochemical (ESA models 5100A and 5200A), and photodiode array (SpectraSystem UV6000LP) detection systems. The Shimadzu HPLC systems are integrated directly into one of two dedicated PC's running Shimadzu EZChrom software for automated post-run analysis. Likewise, the SpectraSystem system is integrated to a dedicated PC running Chromquest (OEM version of EZChrom software). Three of the four HPLC systems include automated injection systems (2 Shimadzu SIL-10A's, 1 SpectraSystem AS3000) for more convenient analysis of a large number of samples. A Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 300 AA is available for the determination of metals and metal containing compounds, such as cisplatin and its analogs. Sample analysis by AA utilizes an automated injection system, with data acquisition and analysis using WinLab software on a dedicated PC. The GC/MS instrumentation is composed of a Shimadzu Model QP-5000 EI gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, interfaced directly to a dedicated PC running CLASS-5000 software. A Micromass Quattro Ultima API Triple Stage Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer System (LC/MS/MS) provides exquisite selectivity and sensitivity for analytes in complex biological matrices. Instrument control and data acquisition for the Micromass mass detector and the associated Agilent HPLC are coordinated through a MassLynx-NT Workstation running MassLynx and QuanLynx software. As a result of high demand for LC/MS/.MS services, a second triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (Waters Premier XE) was recently obtained to increase our capabilities. The front-end on the Premier XE is a Waters Agility Ultra-high Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (UPLC) that allows us to maximize sensitivity and minimize run-times, thereby increasing throughput. Like the Quattro Ultima, instrument control and data analysis on the Premier XE is performed with MassLynx and QuanLynx software. In addition, MetaboLynx software was purchased to aid in metabolite identification.

Pricing

Current pricing can be found on our iLab site. Please contact us for further questions.
 

Analytical Pharmacology Team

Contact Us

Edward Newman, Ph.D.
Co-director
626-256-HOPE (4673)
enewman@coh.org
 
Timothy W. Synold, Pharm.D.
Co-director
626-256-HOPE (4673)
tsynold@coh.org
 
City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA  91010-3000
 
Shapiro Building
Room 1042
Phone: 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62110
Fax: 626-301-8898
 

Analytical Pharmacology

Analytical Pharmacology Core Facility (APCF)

The Analytical Pharmacology Core facility (APCF) encourages and facilitiates collaborative research between basic scientists and clinicians by providing a wide range of analytical services that benefit both groups. The APCF conducts pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for both chemotherapy clinical trials and peer-reviewed preclinical studies.
 
The primary services of the APCF are:
 
  • Assay development and analysis (LS/MS/MS, GC/MS, HPLC, and AAS) of chemotherapeutic agents and related compounds.
  • Study design and expert analysis of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and metabolic data.
 
The facility’s services are available to both City of Hope and external researchers.
 

Research reported in this publication included work performed in the Analytical Pharmacology Core supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award number P30CA33572. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
 

 

Services and Equipment

Services and Equipment

Services
Services currently offered by the Analytical Pharmacology Core facility:
  • Initial consultation on research projects
  • Study design and protocol review
  • Development, implementation, and validation of analytical methods.
  • Sample analysis (LC/MS/MS, GC/MS, HPLC, and AAS).
  • Pharmacokinetic programming and data analysis
  • Sample acquisition, tracking, and storage. Sample acquisition, storage analysis, including HPLC, LC/MS/MS and GC/MS, and microbiological assay methodologies
  • Participation in collaborative writing

Equipment
Analytical capabilities cover a wide range of available methods including:
  • LC/MC/MS (Waters Quattro Ultima and Quattro Premier XE
  • GC/MS (2 Shimadzu QP-5000's
  • HPLC with UV/Vis, fluorescence, and electrochemical detection (Shimadzu and Thermo Separations)
  • AAS with graphite furnace (PerkinElmer AAnalyst 300

HPLC capability includes four complete systems, which are integrated directly to dedicated computers running EZChrom software for automated post-run analysis. Three of the HPLC systems include automated injection systems for more convenient analysis of a large number of samples.

Instrument control and data acquisition for the Micromass mass detector and the associated Agilent HPLC are coordinated through a MassLynx-NT workstation running MassLynx and QuanLynx software. The GC/MS instrumentation is composed of a Shimadzu Model QP-5000 EI gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, interfaced directly to a dedicated computer running CLASS-5000 software.

In addition to the chromatographic instrumentation, a Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 300 flameless atomic absorption spectrometer (AA) is available for the determination of metals and metal-containing compounds such as cisplatin and its analogs. Sample analysis by AA utilizes an automated injection system, with data acquisition and analysis using WinLab software on a dedicated computer.

 

Using the Facility

Using the Facility

Scheduling Equipment
To access the Analytical Pharmacology Core facility, investigators should contact Timothy Synold to start the process.

Abstract for Grants

Abstract for Grants

The APCF is located in the Shapiro Building and the analytical equipment is in room 1042. Freezers for sample storage are also located in the Beckman Center Freezer Farm, Room 1012. An additional HPLC with a diode array detector that is used part time for core service activities is located in room 1002 of the Fox North Research Building. HPLC capability includes four complete HPLC systems consisting of seven solvent delivery modules (4 Shimadzu LC-10A's, 2 Shimadzu LC-10AD's, 1 SpectraSystem P4000). HPLC detection capabilities cover a wide range of currently available methods, including UV/Vis (Shimadzu SPD-10AV), fluorescence (Shimadzu RF-10A), electrochemical (ESA models 5100A and 5200A), and photodiode array (SpectraSystem UV6000LP) detection systems. The Shimadzu HPLC systems are integrated directly into one of two dedicated PC's running Shimadzu EZChrom software for automated post-run analysis. Likewise, the SpectraSystem system is integrated to a dedicated PC running Chromquest (OEM version of EZChrom software). Three of the four HPLC systems include automated injection systems (2 Shimadzu SIL-10A's, 1 SpectraSystem AS3000) for more convenient analysis of a large number of samples. A Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 300 AA is available for the determination of metals and metal containing compounds, such as cisplatin and its analogs. Sample analysis by AA utilizes an automated injection system, with data acquisition and analysis using WinLab software on a dedicated PC. The GC/MS instrumentation is composed of a Shimadzu Model QP-5000 EI gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, interfaced directly to a dedicated PC running CLASS-5000 software. A Micromass Quattro Ultima API Triple Stage Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer System (LC/MS/MS) provides exquisite selectivity and sensitivity for analytes in complex biological matrices. Instrument control and data acquisition for the Micromass mass detector and the associated Agilent HPLC are coordinated through a MassLynx-NT Workstation running MassLynx and QuanLynx software. As a result of high demand for LC/MS/.MS services, a second triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (Waters Premier XE) was recently obtained to increase our capabilities. The front-end on the Premier XE is a Waters Agility Ultra-high Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (UPLC) that allows us to maximize sensitivity and minimize run-times, thereby increasing throughput. Like the Quattro Ultima, instrument control and data analysis on the Premier XE is performed with MassLynx and QuanLynx software. In addition, MetaboLynx software was purchased to aid in metabolite identification.

Pricing

Pricing

Current pricing can be found on our iLab site. Please contact us for further questions.
 

Analytical Pharmacology Team

Analytical Pharmacology Team

Contact Us

Contact Us

Edward Newman, Ph.D.
Co-director
626-256-HOPE (4673)
enewman@coh.org
 
Timothy W. Synold, Pharm.D.
Co-director
626-256-HOPE (4673)
tsynold@coh.org
 
City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA  91010-3000
 
Shapiro Building
Room 1042
Phone: 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 62110
Fax: 626-301-8898
 
Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
Support Our Research
By giving to City of Hope, you support breakthrough discoveries in laboratory research that translate into lifesaving treatments for patients with cancer and other serious diseases.
 
 
 
 
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